Skip to main content

Full text of "The history of the Evangelical Lutheran Synod and Ministerium of North Carolina, in commemoration of the completion of the first century of its existence"

See other formats


DUKE UNIVERSITY LIBRARY 
DURHAM, N. C. 




Rec'd^U fLA . 3,S 'y/*? '3.*? 




r 



~\ 



;^-y 




REV. G. D. BERNHEIM, I>. D 




REV. GEORGE H. COX, D. D. 




THE HISTORY 




Evangelical Lutheran Synod 
and Ministerium 



NORTH CAROLINA, 



IN COMMEMORATION OF THE COMPLETION OF THE FIRST 
CENTURY OF ITS EXISTENCE. 



G.;D. BERNHEIM, D. D., and GEORGE H. COX, D. D. 



" Remember the days of old, consider the years of many generations : ask 
thy father, and he will shew thee ; thy elders, and tJiey will tell thee.' 1 '' 

(Deuteronomy xxxii. 7. ) 






1902. 
PUBLISHED FOR THE SYNOD 

BY THE 

LUTHERAN PUBLICATION SOCIETY, 
PHILADELPHIA, PA. 





Copyright, 1902, 

BY 

G. D. Bernheim and George- H. Cox. 

In trust for 

The Evangelical Lutheran Synod and Ministerium 

of North Carolina. 




Universitj I 
PREFACE. 

\i 

It was no self-assumed undertaking that the authors of this 
History of the North Carolina Synod prepared this book for 
publication. They were appointed so to do by the Synod, as 
early as 1897, in order that it might be, when completed, an 
appropriate memorial volume for the Synod's approaching cen- 
tenary anniversary, in 1903. 

It has been a very pleasant, though by no means an easy, task 
to collect the material and write the history of this, the third 
oldest Lutheran Synod in America, and the Mother Synod of the 
Lutheran Church in the South. 

Many difficulties presented themselves in the prosecution of 
the work, chiefly the meagreness of early records, necessitating 
much searching and extensive correspondence in collecting re- 
liable facts. Time and labor have been unstintedly employed ; 
no pains were spared in consulting every book and document 
available to us that was likely to furnish any desired information 
on the subject. 

We herewith cheerfully acknowledge our indebtedness to 
"Bernheim's History of the German Settlements and of the 
Lutheran Church in the Carolinas," " Hazelius' American Lu- 
theran Church," "Saunders' Colonial Records" in the Wil- 
mington, N. C, Library, " Mann's Halle Reports," the 
" Helmstaedt Reports," " Rumple's History of Rowan 
County," and last, but not least, the entire set of the printed 
Minutes of the North Carolina Synod, from 1803 to the present 
time^ 

With just and generous appreciation of what other Synods 
have accomplished, we feel assured that all who read these pages 
will be convinced that, under Divine blessing, the North Caro- 
lina Synod has been no unimportant factor in carrying on the 
work of the great Lutheran Church in America. 



135634 



IV PREFACE. 

If, by the reading of this History, the present and future 
members of the North Carolina Synod will be inspired to carry 
on the work of ministering at her altars with the pure Word 
and Sacraments, and extending her church work as faithfully as 
their predecessors have done, the authors will be fully satisfied 
that their labor has not been in vain. 

May God's blessing rest upon this History of our time-honored 
Synod, and may we all more and more be enabled to sing : 

" My Church, my Church, my dear old Church ; 
My fathers' and my own." 

G. D. Bernheim, 
George H. Cox. 



CONTENTS. 



PAGE 

CHAPTER I. 
Early Colonial History , 9 

CHAPTER II. 

The Life and Labors of the First Lutheran Ministers 

in North Carolina 12 

CHAPTER III. 

The Causes That Ted to the Organization of the North 

Carolina Synod 21 

CHAPTER IV. 
Confessional History of the Synod 27 

CHAPTER V. 
Territory and Growth of the Synod 35 

CHAPTER VI. 
The Rupture of 1819 and 1820 42 

CHAPTER VII. 
The License System 52 

CHAPTER VIII. 

The Synod's Connection With the General Bodies of 

the Church 58 

CHAPTER IX. 
The Educational Work of the Synod 64 



VI CONTENTS. 

PAGE 

CHAPTER X. 

The Catechetical and Sunday School Work of the 

Synod 75 

CHAPTER XI. 
Miscellaneous Matters of Interest 79 

CHAPTER XII. 
The Missionary Operations of the Synod 85 

CHAPTER XIII. 
Retrospective and Prospective 94 

CHAPTER XIV. 

Sketches of All Congregations Now Connected With 

the Synod 98 

CHAPTER XV. 
Noteworthy Transactions of Synod 155 

CHAPTER XVI. 

A Tabulated Sketch of Every Minister That Has Ever 

Been Connected With the Synod 164 

CHAPTER XVII. 

The Growth of the Synod in the Number of Its Min- 
isters 178 

CHAPTER XVIII. 
A Summary of Parochial Reports 180 

CHAPTER XIX. 
A Summary of Financial Reports 182 



CONTENTS. Vll 

PAGE 

CHAPTER XX. 

A Table Showing When and Where the Different Syn- 

odical Meetings Were Held 184 

CHAPTER XXI. 
The Officers of Synod 188 

CHAPTER XXII. 

A Table Showing the Work of the Board of Church 

Extension 190 

CHAPTER XXIII. 

A Table Showing the Statistics of the Woman's Home 

and Foreign Missionary Society 191 



ILLUSTRATIONS. 



PAGE 

Rev. G. D. Bernheim, D. D Frontispiece 

Rev. George H. Cox, D. D Facing frontispiece 

Julia Carolina University, Helmstedt, Germany, where 

Rev. C. A. G. Storch was Educated 17 

Rev. Daniel J. Hauer, D. D 55 

Rev. Daniel I. Dreher 61 

Rev. S. Rothrock, D. D 67 

North Carolina College, Mt. Pleasant, N. C 71 

Mont Amoena Female Seminary, Mt. Pleasant, N. C . . . . 72 

Rev. Jacob Scherer 87 

Rev. Paul Henkel and Wife 88- 

Organ Evangelical Lutheran Church, Rowan County, 

N. C 119 

St. John's Evangelical Lutheran Church, Salisbury, N. C. 126 

St. John's Evangelical Lutheran Church, Cabarrus 

County, N. C 129 

St. Paul's Evangelical Lutheran Church, Wilmington, 

N.C 134 

St. Mark's Evangelical Lutheran Church and Parson- 
age, Charlotte, N. C 143 

St. James' Evangelical Lutheran Church, Concord, N. C. 146 



HISTORY 



Evangelical Lutheran Synod 



NORTH CAROLINA. 



CHAPTER I. 

EARLY COLONIAL HISTORY. 



The history of the Evangelical Lutheran Synod of North 
Carolina naturally begins with the history of the first Lutheran 
settlements in that wilderness, then but recently vacated by the 
Indians, now known as the Piedmont section of North Carolina. 

Early records of colonization are few, difficult to find, and, 
when found, meagre in the narrative of facts that we most desire 
to know. But careful research makes it tolerably certain that 
the first German settlements in the Piedmont section were made 
in those localities now known as Rowan and Cabarrus Counties, 
about the year 1747. "Saunders' Colonial Records" state 
that, in the year 1755, Governor Arthur Dobbs visited these 
localities and found twenty-two families of Germans and Swiss, 
who had settled there some seven or eight years previously, that 
is, about 1747. 

This antedates the settlement of the Moravians in that part of 
the State now known as Forsythe and other counties, as we learn 
from the life of their bishop, Spangenberg, who began the first 

(9) ^ 



IO HISTORY OF NORTH CAROLINA SYNOD. 

survey of the Wachovia tract in 1752, preparatory to the settle- 
ment of the Moravian colony, in 1753. 

These families, the children and descendants of the original 
German settlers of Pennsylvania, had left their homes and their 
kindred in search of farm lands that could be more easily ac- 
quired than in the older settlements. No doubt news of their 
success had been carried back to their relatives, friends, and 
neighbors, and very soon, during the years that immediately 
followed, the emigrant wagon train of these hardy Germans 
wound its way down the Cumberland Valley of Pennsylvania, 
through the Shenandoah Valley of Virginia, over the rugged 
steeps of the Blue Ridge Mountains, into the inviting forest 
lands of North Carolina. 

" These German settlers were all industrious, economical, and 
thrifty farmers, not afraid nor ashamed of hard labor, and were 
soon blessed with an abundance of everything which the fertile 
soil and temperate climate of that portion of North Carolina 
could furnish them. As they were all agriculturists, they gen- 
erally avoided settling themselves in towns ; uninformed in the 
ways of the world, ignorant of the English language, and un- 
acquainted with the shrewdness necessary for merchandising, 
yet well informed in their own language and well read in their 
Bibles and other devotional German books, they remained at 
their own country homes, and enriched themselves with the pro- 
ductions of the soil." * 

The country to which they had come was an unexplored and 
almost impenetrable wilderness, in which many wild animals 
still were found, and which had but very recently been inhab- 
ited by none but the wild red man of the forest. 

The new colonists had before them very much hard work to 
be done, with nothing but their own strength and skill to ac- 
complish it. Forests were to be felled ; the wilderness of nature 
to be subdued ; the ground to be cultivated ; the wild animals 
of the forest to be conquered ; homes, school-houses, and 
churches to be reared ; and all the many things necessary to 
make a home in the wilderness. 

* Bernheim's History. 



EARLY COLONIAL HISTORY. II 

Prominent among their noble qualities was their religion ; 
and hence, amidst their homes, they built their churches and 
organized their congregations. St. John's, in Salisbury ; Zion, 
commonly called Organ Church, on Second Creek, Rowan 
County; and St. John's, on Buffalo Creek, in Cabarrus County, 
were the original mother-churches. These congregations were 
organized and their primitive houses of worship were erected 
very nearly about the same time. Their people Avere as one 
family. With the exception of Rev. Nussman, who died in 1794, 
their first pastors were the original organizers of the Synod, 
and the members of these congregations its bone and sinew. 

For many long years they were without regular pastors, having 
only the services of such preachers as might happen to pass 
through the country. In the older settlements, from which they 
had emigrated, there were but few Lutheran ministers, and none 
at all to spare. In America, at that early period, there were 
no schools or seminaries for the education and training of min- 
isters of their faith, and hence the only source from which to 
obtain pastors was the mother-church, in Germany, necessitat- 
ing a tedious and dangerous voyage in a sailing vessel across the 
ocean. Thither they turned, and with blessed results, for in 
1773 came their first regular pastor, the Rev. Adolphus Nuss- 
man. Accompanying him was the school teacher, J. Gottfried 
Arends (Arndt), who, two years later, was ordained to the 
Gospel ministry. 

Then again, in 1788, came the Rev. Carl August Gottlieb 
Storch, in response to a call from Nussman for help in his work. 
These labored sedulously, in season and out of season, not only 
in the congregations of which they were pastors, but reaching 
out in all directions, traveling thousands of miles, through 
mountains and valleys, in all seasons of the year, covering an 
immense territory, organizing congregations wherever it was 
possible ; selecting, fitting, and preparing young men for the 
Gospel ministry, ordaining them to the same, and thus laying 
the foundations of the great work that has followed them, and 
that stands to-day as a lasting monument to their ability, wisdom, 
and faithfulness. 



CHAPTER II. 

THE LIFE AND LABORS OF THE FIRST LUTHERAN MINISTERS IN 
NORTH CAROLINA. 

The immigration of German Lutherans to America began 
about the year 1680 ; the account of the Swedish and Dutch 
Lutherans not being included in this history. In a few years 
they made permanent settlements in New York, Pennsylvania, 
Virginia, Delaware, and North Carolina. Most of them had 
left the old Fatherland because of religious persecutions, and had 
come to the newly colonized country in search of freedom to 
worship God. They were, generally, very destitute in the 
things of this world, many of them being so impoverished by 
the war of the Spanish Succession as to be dependent upon the 
charity of Queen Anne of England, and the liberality of others, 
for both their passage across the ocean and for their sustenance 
for a time after arriving in America. 

Very few pastors of their own faith came with them, so that 
for long and wearisome years most of them were without any 
religious privileges, and their children without the opportunities 
of securing an education. 

The beginnings of the Lutheran Church in America were very 
small. The few pastors that were located here were men of 
ability, of strong faith and much physical endurance, but they 
could not cultivate the immense field, "White to the harvest," 
that was spread out before them. The demands upon them were 
greater than they could possibly meet, and hence constant ap- 
peals were sent to the mother-church in the Fatherland, the only 
source from which help could come. But it was a long, weari- 
some, and hazardous journey across the ocean in those days, and 
pastors who were willing to leave home and friends and sever 
the ties of relationship, and then undertake the long journey to 
labor in the wilderness of America, were not easily to be found. 

(12) 



LIFE AND LABORS OF THE FIRST LUTHERAN MINISTERS. 1 3 

Hence, although the population of the newly established col- 
onies rapidly increased, both by natural growth and by immi- 
gration, the increase of pastors was not in like proportion. 

Before the Revolutionary War there were in the whole terri- 
tory now occupied by the United States very few Lutheran 
ministers, probably not more than twenty-five, serving congre- 
gations that were scattered all the way from Maine to Georgia. 
In North Carolina, for more than a quarter of a century, the 
German settlers were without any regular pastors, and were de- 
pendent for the occasional administration of the Word and sacra- 
ments upon any preacher who might happen to pass through the 
country. 

Their school teachers would occasionally read a sermon for 
them, bury their dead, and, in extreme cases, baptize their chil- 
dren, but the congregations were wholly without regular pastoral 
care during all those years. 

Then, in 1772, after careful and, no doubt, prayerful consid- 
eration, Organ Church, of Rowan County, and St. John's 
Church, of Mecklenburg (now Cabarrus) County, after having 
unsuccessfully tried to secure a pastor from the older settlements 
in Pennsylvania, determined to send a delegation to the Father- 
land to appeal to their countrymen and brethren in the faith to 
send them a pastor, school teacher, and such pecuniary assist- 
ance as they needed to sustain them in order that they might 
have the Bread of Life broken to them in their own language, 
and by a pastor of their own faith, and also that their children 
might be instructed in the ways of righteousness, as well as to 
be taught, at least, the rudiments of a literary education. 

Accordingly, Christopher Rintleman of Organ Church, and 
Christopher Layerly of St. John's Church, two brave, honest, 
and consecrated men of God, representing sixty families, un- 
dertook the long and hazardous journey, at their own expense. 
Leaving their homes in 1772, they traveled, on horseback, to 
Charleston, S. C, and there took passage to Europe in an ordi- 
nary sailing vessel. 

In the execution of their commission they first visited Lon- 
don, in England, and then went to Hannover, in Germany, and 



s 



14 HISTORY OF NORTH CAROLINA SYNOD. 

so earnestly and successfully did they present the petition of their 
constituents that they returned in 1773, bringing with them the 
Rev. Adolphus Nussman, as their pastor, and Mr. John Gott- 
fried Arends, as their school teacher, besides numerous and 
valuable gifts to their congregations, and promises of continued 
financial aid. Thus the Rev. Adolphus Nussman became their 
first pastor, and the pioneer minister of the Lutheran Church in 
the province of North Carolina. 

Born in Germany, in 1737, he was just in the prime of life. 
A convert from Roman Catholicism, a ripe and thorough scholar, 
a devoted and consecrated Christian, and an earnest and faithful 
preacher of the Gospel, he soon became very popular, winning 
the praise, admiration, and love of all who knew him. For 
twenty-one years, reaching through the stormy period of the 
Revolutionary War, he was instant in season and out of season, 
toiling amidst untold trials and difficulties, until God called him 
up higher. He was buried at St. John's Church, where, for 
twenty years, he had been the zealous and faithful pastor. 

Two years after their arrival, that is, in 1775, the school 
teacher, Arends, was examined and publicly ordained by Rev. 
Joachim Buelow, of South Carolina. The ordination took place 
in Organ Church, August 2 2d, 1775. Thus we learn that the 
Rev. Arends was the first Lutheran minister ever ordained in 
North Carolina. 

These two, Nussman and Arends, for twelve long years, 
labored together throughout the territory now known as the 
counties of Rowan, Cabarrus, Lincoln, Catawba, Iredell, Stokes, 
Davidson, Guilford, and other sections of the country. 

Arends was the second pastor of Organ Church, succeeding 
Nussman immediately upon his ordination, and serving the con- 
gregation for ten years. He was a native of Gottingen, in Ger- 
many, and when he came to America was about thirty-two years 
old. He was fully prepared for his work of teaching, as is at- 
tested by the credentials, which he brought, of which the follow- 
ing is a translation : 



LIFE AND LABORS OF THE FIRST LUTHERAN MINISTERS. 1 5. 



" Certificate of John Gottfried Arends as School 
Teacher to North Carolina, October i6th, 1772. 

" Of his most serene Highness, most mighty Prince and 
Lord, Lord George the Third, King of Great Britain, France, 
and Ireland, Defender of the Faith, Duke of Brunswick and 
Liineburg, Arch Treasurer of the Holy Roman Empire, and 
Elector, etc., real Privy Counselor and authorized President of 
the Royal and Electoral Consistory of this place, also of the 
Counselors of the Church Consistory, certifies herewith that 
the bearer of this, John Gottfried Arends, of Gottingen, in 
compliance with the desire of the Evangelical Lutheran congre- 
gation in North Carolina, namely, in Rowan County, to have a 
capable school teacher ; and to this end, according to the at- 
testation of the Governor, has sent deputies, and his royal 
Majesty and Electoral and serene Highness, our most gracious 
Lord, has commanded us to be serviceable to them ; after due 
examination for such an office, found him to be experienced, he 
also having promised, according to the custom of this country 
and the published appointment for a future school teacher, to 
conduct his office with all fidelity and diligence, and manifest 
obedience toward his pastor, modesty toward the congregation, 
and love for the children. 

" On the other hand, we do not doubt that the congregation 
will amply remunerate his serviceable labor, and make his stay, 
as well as that of the pastor, agreeable. 

" However, should he desire to return, and be able to do so, 
then we promise him a proportional school service in this 
country according to the measure of his deportment and the 
time of his service, provided he has labored six years, at least. 

" In testimony whereof we have affixed the royal and elec- 
toral seal and signature of the Consistory. 

•' Given in Hannover, the sixteenth day of October, 1772. 

" Respectfully, 

" Kauff." 

f LARGE I 

(_ SEAL. j 

For two years he taught the children of the congregation, and 
then, upon the request of the congregation and with the ap- 
proval of Pastor Nussman, was ordained to the Gospel ministry,. 



1 6 HISTORY OF NORTH CAROLINA SYNOD. 

on the eleventh Sunday after Trinity, 1775, as is attested by his 
ordination certificate, of which the following is a translation : 

" Second Creek, Rowan County, N. C. 

"August 28, Anno Christi, 1775, 
"Being the Eleventh Sunday after Trinity. 

" The Rev. Mr. John Gottfried Arends has been examined by 
me, the Inspector over South and North Carolina, in the presence 
of several deacons, and thereupon ordained before the whole 
congregation, at their request. 

" The above-mentioned John Gottfried Arends is now, from 
this date, a regular Evangelical Lutheran pastor and minister. 
We recommend him, therefore, to the kind reception of all 
Christians at the North, and heartily wish that he may, as a 
friend of the Bridegroom, bring many souls to the marriage sup- 
per of the Lamb, and wait faithfully upon his office ; also, with 
exemplary life and pure doctrine, bring all the straying and de- 
ceived back to the fold. 

" This witnesseth out of love for the truth and its undoubted 
attestation. 

"Signed, Joachim Buelow, 

" Missionary and Inspector over South and North Carolina.' 1 '' 

During his ten years' service as pastor of Organ Church, he 
made numerous missionary tours, visiting scattered Lutherans, 
preaching the Word to them, baptizing their children, confirm- 
ing their young people, and organizing congregations wherever 
it was practicable. But his chief work was in Rowan County, 
until the close of the Revolutionary War, when, in 17S5, he re- 
moved to Lincoln' County and became the founder of the 
Lutheran Church in all of that territory lying west of the Catawba 
River. There he labored unceasingly until July 9th, 1807, 
when, being sixty-six years, six months, and twenty-eight days 
of age, worn and weary and blind, he passed triumphantly over 
into the land of eternal bliss, leaving as legacy, to the Church 
and his posterity, an enduring reputation for piety, humility, and 
zeal. 

He was buried beneath the old "Dutch Meeting-house," in 
Lincolnton. A tombstone marks the sacred spot, upon which 
is carved an eagle, thirteen stars, and the motto of the then new 




JULIA CAROLINA UNIVERSITY, HELMSTEDT, GERMANY, WHERE 
REV. C. A. G. STORCH WAS EDUCATED. 



LIFE AND LABORS OF THE FIRST LUTHERAN MINISTERS. I 7 

Republic, "E. PluribusUnum," and the following inscription, in 
' ' old German : ' ' 

" Here rests the body of the Rev. John Gottfried Arends. 
Having been a true Evangelical Preacher, and died July 9th, 
1807, at the age of sixty-six years, six months, and twenty-eight 
days, of a kind of consumptive disease, after faithfully ad- 
ministering the office of preacher for thirty-two years. 

" ' Blessed are all those who die, like thou : 
They, to the rest of heaven, shall come.' 

" ' Remember, man, as you pass by, 
As you are now, so once was I ; 
As I am now you soon shall be, 
Therefore prepare to follow me.' " 

The Rev. Charles Augustus Gottlieb Storch was born, edu- 
cated, and ordained in Germany. In response to repeated calls 
from Nussman, at length, in 1788, the Helmstaedt Missionary 
Society sent the Rev. Storch to his assistance. He was a man 
of remarkable ability, having a thorough university training, a 
close and painstaking student, and was well versed in all ques- 
tions of doctrine and Church polity then claiming the at- 
tention of the Church. For forty-three years he was the recog- 
nized leader of the Church in the South, and also exerted a 
strong influence in other parts of the country. Such was his 
scholarship that it was said he could converse fluently in five or 
six different languages. His life was full of labors for the Mas- 
ter, and men bestowed high honors upon him. In 1814 he was 
called to St. John's Church, in Charleston, S. C, but he de- 
clined the call, thereby endearing him all the more to his con- 
gregation in Rowan County. He died March 27th, 183 1, in 
the full triumphs of a living faith, and was buried in Organ 
Church graveyard. 

In the language of Dr. Rumple, a Presbyterian minister, in 
his " History of Rowan County," N. C, "His long service of 
more than forty years, including the critical period of his 
people's transition from the use of the German to the use of the 
English language, did much to preserve Lutheranism from decay 
and extinction in Rowan County. It is because of his labors, 



1 8 HISTORY OF NORTH CAROLINA SYNOD. 

doubtless, that the Lutherans are, at the present day, equal in 
numbers to all other denominations together in this county." 

In the year 1787 Rev. Nussman's heart was gladdened in be- 
ing permitted to welcome another laborer into the mission field 
of the Lutheran Church in North Carolina. This was the Rev. 
Christian Eberhard Bernhardt, a native of Stuttgart, in the 
kingdom of Wiirtemberg. He was ordained in Wiirtemberg, 
about 1785, and came to America in the year 1786. He landed 
at Savannah, and then proceeded to Ebenezer, Ga., where he 
remained twelve months. In 1787 he went to Rowan County, 
N. C, and labored among the churches there one year, doubt- 
less in that part of the county east of the Yadkin River, now 
known as Davidson County. In 1788 he took charge of the 
congregations in Stokes and Forsythe Counties, which had been 
organized and frequently visited by Rev. Nussman. Here Rev. 
Bernhardt was married, but the records do not mention the 
name of his wife. One year later he removed to Guilford 
County, where he remained to the close of the year 1800, when 
he accepted the call to become the pastor of Zion's and several 
other Lutheran churches in Lexington District, S. C. There 
he served until August 27th, 1809, when he passed over the 
river of death and entered into the land of eternal rest. He 
was a good and true servant of the Lord and did faithful work 
in His vineyard. 

Rev. Arnold Roschen was born, educated, ordained, and 
married in the city of Bremen, Germany. He came to America 
in 1788, arriving at Charleston, S. C, on the twenty-eighth day 
of November. He remained in Charleston ten weeks and then 
spent two weeks in his overland trip to North Carolina, arriving 
February 20th, 1789. His work was in Davidson County and 
his home was near Beck's Church, now belonging to the Ten- 
nessee Synod. Very little is known of him, except that he re- 
mained here but about eleven years, returning to Germany some 
time in 1800. 

Rev. Robert Johnson Miller was born and educated in Scot- 
land. He came to America in 1774, one year after the arrival 
of Revs. Nussman and Arends. He located in Charlestown, 



LIFE AND LABORS OF THE FIRST LUTHERAN MINISTERS. 1 9 

Mass., engaging in mercantile business until the opening of the 
Revolutionary War, when he enlisted in the American army. 
The close of the war found him in Virginia, where, in 1784, he 
joined the Methodist Church and was licensed as a Methodist 
preacher. Laboring as such, he eventually came to North Caro- 
lina and preached in some of the western counties. About the 
year 1786 he became lay reader for the Whitehaven congrega- 
tion of Lincoln, County. This was an Episcopal congregation, 
composed of Episcopalians, Lutherans, and, possibly, German 
Reformed. The congregation had been dependent upon Rev. 
Arends for the administration of the Word and sacraments, but 
now, as related in another chapter, Miller was ordained, upon 
the petition from this congregation. For twenty -two years he 
labored as a Lutheran pastor, faithfully serving several Lutheran 
congregations. Once he was elected President and thrice as 
Secretary of the Synod, and in 1S21, when he withdrew from 
the Lutheran Church, the President of Synod, Rev. G. Schober, 
in the name of the whole Lutheran Church, tendered him 
thanks for his many years of faithful service. He died in 1834, 
having lived a long and useful life in the service of the Master. 

The Rev. Paul Henkel was a great-grandson of Rev. Gerhard 
Henkel, who was one among the very first Lutheran ministers 
to come to America. He was born near where Salisbury now 
stands, in 1754, or about seven years after the first German set- 
tlements, and forty-nine years before the organization of the 
North Carolina Synod. In 1760 the family removed to Vir- 
ginia. When a young man, about twenty-two years old, he- 
began preparing for the Gospel ministry, under the instruction 
of the Rev. J. A. Krug, of Fredericktown, Md. He was ex- 
amined and licensed by the Ministerium of Pennsylvania, and 
afterward ordained by the same body, in Philadelphia, Pa., 
June 6th, 1792. He labored zealously, faithfully, and accept- 
ably in different parts of Virginia until 1800, when he accepted 
a call to work in his native State. For five years he labored in 
Rowan and adjoining counties and then returned to Virginia, 
where he died on November 27th, 1825, loved and lamented by 
all who knew him. 



20 HISTORY OF NORTH CAROLINA SYNOD. 

Such were the men who, under God, were the pastors and 
leaders of the churches in North Carolina, prior to and reaching 
up to the organization of the Synod, in 1803. In intellectual 
attainments and culture they were giants in their day and gen- 
eration ; in their pastoral aptitude and faithfulness they have 
never been excelled ; and their pulpit eloquence and power were 
such that vast congregations gathered to hear them, and many 
hundreds of souls were brought, under their ministration, to the 
saving knowledge of the truth as it is in Jesus. 

They were not confined, in their labors, to any geographical 
limits ; the whole country, destitute of the means of grace, was 
their pastorate, and all needy souls their care. Broadly, deeply, 
and firmly they laid the foundations of many congregations in 
different States : some in North Carolina, South Carolina, Vir- 
ginia, Tennessee, Kentucky, and even in Indiana and Ohio. 
Their business was hunting for perishing, lost souls ; feeding 
them upon the blessed word and sacraments ; and instructing 
and confirming the young and old in the glorious faith " Once 
delivered to the saints." 

Long years ago their earthly toils were ended and they 
entered into that " Rest that remains to the people of God." 
Their blessed memory is with us, and the fruits of their labor 
we see all around us. God help us to follow them in their zeal 
and fidelity. 



CHAPTER III. 

THE CAUSES THAT LED TO THE ORGANIZATION OF THE NORTH 
CAROLINA SYNOD. 

During the fifty-six years that intervened between 1747, the 
time of the first German settlements in the Piedmont section of 
North Carolina, and 1803, the time of the organization of the 
North Carolina Synod, many important events and changes had 
taken place, both in Church and State. Many of these events 
were fraught with deep interest and vital consequences. 

When we read of the trials and difficulties, labors and sacri- 
fices, privations and sufferings of those few pioneer pastors of 
our Church in North Carolina, it seems hardly credible that they 
could have endured so much and accomplished such really °reat 
things as they did. 

Suppose, for example, that Nussman and Arends and Storch, 
like some others, had become discouraged and disheartened, 
and had abandoned the field, what would have been the conse- 
quences? Certainly the progress of our Church would have 
been retarded for years, and, possibly, her destruction accom- 
plished by her members being carried over into other folds, as 
was the case, in some instances, in other parts of the United 
States. 

Among the causes leading up to the organization of the Synod 
was the Revolutionary War, with its attendant influences and 
results upon Church and State. The period just preceding the 
outbreak of the war was full of encouragement and hope to the 
German settlers. They had had many and severe struggles 
during the first years of their settlement in North Carolina, but 
at length, under the blessings of the Almighty, temporal success 
had crowned their efforts ; peace, prosperity, and happiness 
were theirs to a greater extent, and in a higher degree, than ever 
before. So, too, the conditions and prospects of the Church of 

( 21) 



2 2 HISTORY OF NORTH CAROLINA SYNOD. 

their love were brighter and more promising than they had 
ever been. Under the energetic, persevering, and faithful 
labors of their pastors, congregations had been organized and 
churches were being erected wherever there were Lutherans suf- 
ficient to justify the step, and, notwithstanding the immense 
amount of labor necessary to do so, these congregations were 
being faithfully served, and were growing in numbers, works, 
and fruits. True, there still were only a few pastors to occupy 
and cultivate the wide and growing field ; but, few as they were, 
they made up for the lack in numbers in their faith, zeal, and 
perseverance. 

Through the instrumentality of their pastors, an interest in 
the colony, and especially in their churches, had been created 
in the parent Church in Germany. And, as a result, men and 
means had already been sent over, and there were prospects and 
promise of continued assistance in the near future, so that the 
colonists confidently and joyfully looked forward to the time 
when they would be fully provided with pastors and teachers to 
supply all their spiritual needs. But, alas ! how soon were all 
these bright prospects blasted ! The colonies were plunged into 
a bloody and heroic struggle for liberty, that lasted for eight 
long years ; and that, when ended, although liberty and inde- 
pendence were secured, it left behind evil results, from which 
it took them many more years to recover. 

No matter how grand and inspiring the end contemplated, 
nor how glorious the final results, war is always a calamity. It 
inevitably brings death and destruction to both life and property. 
To the colonists in North Carolina, just emerging from their 
long and severe struggle, it came with blasting effects. Divi- 
sions were created between neighbors and friends, and even in 
families ; their hard-earned and closely husbanded means were, 
in a measure, swept away ; all progress and improvements ceased ; 
and the bright prospects, so lately theirs, disappeared like mist 
before the rising sun. Not only so, but under the baneful in- 
fluences of the war, the faith and morals of the people became 
unsettled ; the means of grace were partially, and, in some 
ocalities, wholly neglected ; resulting in apostasy, skepticism, 



CAUSES THAT LED 'TO THE ORGANIZATION. 23 

and reckless infidelity. Rationalism also reared aloft its ser- 
pent head until, as a natural result, there was a breaking away 
from the old moorings of faith, and a corresponding godlessness 
and immorality of life. Our Lutheran colonists were not an 
■exception to the general rule ; and hence the old Lutheran faith 
suffered, and the old symbols of that faith were set aside by 
many as old and effete ; or, if acknowledged at all, with such 
mental reservations as would eventually, if allowed to continue, 
have completely undermined and destroyed them ; while under 
the alluring name of liberty, church discipline was ignored and 
despised until the Rev. Storch was forced to admit that " Party 
spirit has risen to a fearful height. The prevalence of infidelity, 
the contempt of the best of all religions, its usages and servants, 
the increase of irreligion and crime, have occasioned me many 
sad hours. ' ' 

Another consequence of the war, already telling so heavily 
upon our colonists and the Church, was the withdrawal of pecu- 
niary aid and the furnishing of pastors by the Consistory of 
Hanover, in Germany, under whose supervision the churches in 
North Carolina had been, ever since the commissioners from 
•Organ and St. John's congregations had laid their needs before 
it, in 1772. 

During the eight years of the war, all communication with 
Germany was, of course, interrupted. And after the war, the 
Consistory of Hanover became indifferent to the necessities of 
the churches in North Carolina, because George III., of the 
house of Hanover, was the reigning King of England, and the 
Consistory of Hanover naturally was antagonistic to the inde- 
pendence of the American colonies. Finally, they transferred 
them to the supervision of the Helmstaedt Mission Society ; 
otherwise the churches might have dwindled away and died. 
Even with this help the churches were reduced to a feeble and 
impoverished condition, from which there seemed, at that time, 
but little hope of recovery. 

It is one of the peculiarities of mankind to run from one ex- 
treme to another; and, true to nature, in 1S00 and 1801, in the 
turning away from infidelity and rationalism, that had become 



24 HISTORY OF NORTH CAROLINA SYNOD. 

so widespread and devastating in its results, there swept over 
the land a tide of fanatical revivalism, of a character and de- 
monstration never known nor heard of before, causing wonder 
and surprise among both pastors and people, and resulting in a 
confusion of mind and a division of opinions. 

The German churches for a time, at least, governed by the 
wise counsels of their pastors, refrained from participation in 
the wild and extravagant doings of those around them. But 
seeing their neighbors and associates, under the influence of 
preaching and praying, so strangely and powerfully affected, and 
finding that even their own pastors did not understand this 
emotional religion and were unable to explain it to them, it is 
no wonder that they, too, at length, yielded to this mysterious 
influence, and were carried into the movement even, perhaps, 
against their own better judgment. 

The German Lutheran pastors were not, at first, agreed as to 
the worth and reliability of these new measures, and, naturally 
enough, felt the need of an organization, that would bring them 
into more intimate communion with each other, and be as a 
bond of union among them ; some kind of an organization 
through which they could meet and consult with each other, and 
thus protect themselves and their people against false views and 
erroneous practices as they existed around them. So, also, 
they realized the need of more pastors, and the difficulty in ob- 
taining them from Germany, hence the necessity of some kind 
of an organization among themselves that would not be under 
any foreign supervision, but have power and authority to ex- 
amine applicants for the ministerial office, and, when found 
qualified, ordain them. This was impressed still more forcibly 
upon them by the remembrance of the petition that had been 
presented to the Lutheran pastors of Rowan and Mecklenburg 
Counties, asking them to examine and ordain Robert Johnson 
Miller, in order that he might serve certain churches in Lincoln 
County. In compliance with the wishes of the petitioners, a 
meeting was called at St. John's Church, Mecklenburg County, 
for May 20th, 1794, and then and there was held the first 
ecclesiastical assembly of the Lutheran Church of North Car- 
olina. 



CAUSES THAT LED TO THE ORGANIZATION. 25 

All the Lutheran pastors, Nussman, Arends, Storch, Roschen, 
and Bernhardt, were present, participated in the examination 
and ordination of Mr. Miller, and signed their names to his 
certificate, which, in a mutilated form, is still in existence.* 

The salient points in connection with this ordination are 
that previous to this time, Mr. Miller had been licensed by the 
Methodist Church to preach the Gospel ; that as such Methodist 
licentiate he had been preaching to an Episcopal congregation ; 
that those Episcopalians were highly pleased with him, and, there 
being no Episcopal Diocese in North Carolina at that time, peti- 
tioned the Lutheran pastors for his ordination ; and that that 
Lutheran Ecclesiastical Assembly, fully satisfied with his exami- 
nation, did ordain him to the Gospel ministry, he always to be 
obedient to the laws of. the Episcopal Church. Thus he was 
the second pastor ever ordained by the Lutheran ministry in 
North Carolina. If there was any other business transacted'at 
that meeting at St. John's, we have no record of it. And yet 
we can easily imagine that they must have consulted with each 
other, talked over the condition of the churches, and of their 
need of closer relations and more frequent intercourse. But, 
strange to say, there was no other meeting held, doubtless owing 
to the death of Rev. Nussman, which occurred only five months 
later, and the moving away of Revs. Roschen and Bernhardt a 
few years after that event. 

Nine years later, however, on May 2d, 1S03, a special con- 
ference of ministers and layman was held in Salisbury, N. C, 
for the sole purpose of organizing themselves into a Synod, or 
conference, as it was then called. Who inaugurated the move- 
ment, and what, if any, preliminary steps were taken, we do 
not know, only they met and organized at that time and place. 
Revs. Arends, Storch, Miller, and Paul Henkel, that is, all the 
Lutheran pastors, together with fourteen lay delegates, constituted 
the convention. 

No list of congregations was published at that time, but there 
are good reasons for believing that Organ, St. John's of Salis- 
bury, Union, Lutheran Chapel, St. John's of Lincoln County, 
Reformation, St. Luke's of Davidson County, Pilgrim, Richland, 
* Bernheim's'History, page 339. 



26 HISTORY OF NORTH CAROLINA SYNOD. 

St. Paul's of Alamance County, Lau's, Frieden's, Beck's, and 
Nazareth congregations were represented. 

Rev. Arends was made President and Rev. Miller, Secretary. 

The only business transacted was the taking of steps looking 
to the preparation and adoption of a constitution and arrang- 
ing for the first animal meeting, to be held in Lincolnton, on 
the third of the following October. 

Nussman, the old pioneer pastor, did not live to see that glad 
day, he having passed to his eternal reward soon after the meet- 
ing to ordain Pastor Miller, that is, November 3d, 1794. 

St. John's Church of Cabarrus County, one of the three 
mother-churches in North Carolina, was not represented, and did 
not take part in the organization of the Synod, not uniting with 
the Synod until its Fourth Convention, held in Organ Church, 
October 20th, 1S06. 

At first there seems to have been no definite action as to the 
name the Synod should bear, being sometimes called " The 
Synod," and sometimes "The Synod of the Lutheran Church." 
But in 181 7 it was definitely fixed as " The Evangelical Lutheran 
German and English Synod of North Carolina and Adjacent 
States." This continued to be the official title until the dis- 
continuance of the use of the German language, when the words 
''German and English" were dropped. And when in the 
course of years other Synods were formed and her work was 
confined to North Carolina, the words " Adjacent States " were 
likewise eliminated. Now her official and chartered title is 
"The Evangelical Lutheran Synod and Ministerium of North 
Carolina." Thus the Synod was launched upon the sea of time. 
The grand old fathers, few but wise and noble, built, indeed, 
better than they knew. Little did they realize the importance 
of the step they had taken ! . Little did they think of the strug- 
gles through which they and the whole Synod would be called 
to pass ! But they built in the name and fear of God, looking 
to Him for guidance, trusting all in His hands. And He 
accepted the trust, and has ever been with the Synod, leading, 
protecting, preserving, and blessing her abundantly. Truly 
may we exclaim in this centennial year of the Synod, 
" Hitherto hath the Lord helped us." 



CHAPTER IV. 

CONFESSIONAL HISTORY OF THE SYNOD. 

That the original fathers and founders of the Lutheran Church 
in America brought with them from the Fatherland a strong 
Lutheran consciousness, an abiding love for the dear old Church, 
and an intelligent faith in her distinctive doctrines and usages 
is certainly beyond question or dispute. But it is also a well- 
known and lamentable fact that in the years that followed great 
changes took place, in many things, that were not always in full 
accord with the teachings of the Symbolical Books. 

Settled in a new and strange land ; far removed from the 
direct influences of the old home Church ; surrounded by fanat- 
ical sects, all eager to proselyte ; with very few ministers of 
their own faith, and in some localities without any for years, 
it is not to be wondered at that the Lutheran confessional con- 
sciousness of their descendants became weakened, blurred, con- 
fused, and in some instances so vitiated as to be scarcely recog- 
nizable. 

As a result of these conditions, the records show that the 
Ministerium of Pennsylvania, the oldest Lutheran Synod in 
America, organized by Muhlenberg and his co-laborers in 1748, 
was for more than half a century without any distinctively 
Lutheran, official, confessional basis. * In her first Constitution, 
in both the original and the later revised editions, there was no 
mention of the Word of God or of any of our Lutheran con- 
fessions. 

So, too, the Ministerium of New York, the second oldest 
Synod in America, organized in 1 7 86, thirty-eight years after 
the Ministerium of Pennsylvania and nineteen years prior to 
the North Carolina Synod, was for years in the same condition. 

* Prof. J. W. Richard, D. U. , in Lutheran Quarterly, October, 1895, page 
459, etc. 

(27) 



28 HISTORY OF NORTH CAROLINA SYNOD. 

Her Constitution was absolutely silent concerning the Bible 
and the Lutheran confessions, and did not even contain the word 
Lutheran. 

It is not strange, therefore, that the German Lutheran settlers 
in North Carolina, who had nearly all come from Pennsylvania, 
where so much laxness prevailed, should be found wanting in 
the same things. Here, too, they were not surrounded with 
any circumstances that specially called for a specific confessional 
statement. They were at peace among themselves, as well as 
with others around them ; there was and had been no assault 
made upon their Church or its doctrines, and hence there was 
no apparent necessity for dogmatical declarations as to their own 
faith, or the faith of the Church which they loved. In con- 
sequence, the Constitution adopted by the North Carolina Synod, 
at its first annual meeting at Lincolnton, N. C, October 17th, 
1803, following the examples of the two older Synods, was 
intended simply as a statement of the principles or laws by 
which they proposed to be governed in carrying on the work 
of the Church and in maintaining discipline among both pas- 
tors and laymen, and not as a specific statement of the con- 
fessional basis of the Synod. As such, it did not contain the 
word Lutheran, nor any direct mention of the confessional writ- 
ings of our Church. 

But that does not mean, and should not be construed to mean, 
that the Synod, as such, had no Lutheran consciousness, was 
lacking in Lutheran faith, or that they questioned, doubted, or 
disputed any of the doctrines of the Lutheran Church, but only 
that there was, at that time, no known necessity for a formal 
and public, confessional statement, and hence no such statement 
was made. 

When, in after years, the necessity arose, her specific declara- 
tion was not wanting. That the Synod, as such, held the true 
Lutheran position, the Word of God, the only and infallible 
rule of faith and practice, and the confessions of the Church 
correct interpretations of that rule, is evident from the fact that 
in her first Constitution she says (Article IV.): " No one shall 
be ordained to the ministry until the ministers who examine 



CONFESSIONAL HISTORY OF THE SYNOD. 29 

him are fully satisfied that he has a sufficient and satisfactory 
acquaintance with the New Testament in the Greek language, 
his faith (doctrines of the Church), and the Latin language." 
There can be no question but that the expression " Doctrines 
of the Church ' ' then meant and had reference to the Lutheran 
confessions, and hence, in this article of the Constitution, there 
is the subscription to both Word and confessions. Not, to be 
sure, in as definite, precise language as she used in after years, 
and yet clear enough that she understood what she meant, and 
there was no challenge to her position. 

From this position she has never receded. So far as authentic 
records are concerned, there are no evidences that she ever 
modified, denied, or rejected any article of the Lutheran faith, 
but has ever pressed on to a deeper conciousness and a fuller 
and clearer statement of what she believes.. 

It is an interesting study to mark how the Synod gradually 
developed her Lutheran consciousness, more and more forcibly, 
plainly and formally expressing herself, as the times and circum- 
stances seemed to demand. 

Thus, in 1804, at the Second Annual Convention, she ordered 
that "The first twenty-one articles of the Augsburg Confession 
be printed on sheets so that all members of the congregations 
may obtain them at small price, so as to become acquainted with 
them.* 

In i8o6f, at the Third Convention, she ordered " That no 
pastor in our connection shall confirm children, except in case 
of absolute necessity, without a six-weeks' preparation before- 
hand." And when the question arose as to " Which Catechism 
should be the basis of instruction?" she unanimously and 
emphatically declared that the Catechism published by Ambro- 
sius Henkel might be used in explaining the meaning, but that 
" Luther's Smaller Catechism must ever be the basis of cate- 
chetical instruction." 

In 1 81 7 she revised her Constitution, and in 18 18 published 
it and twenty-two articles of the Augsburg Confession, together 

* See Printed Minutes, 1804, page 13. 

f See Printed Minutes, 1806, pages 14-15. 



30 HISTORY OF NORTH CAROLINA SYNOD. 

with other matter, in a book, that afterward became a bone of 
contention, and was popularly called "Luther," which by the 
direction of the Synod had been prepared by Rev. G. Shober, 
and which was ' ' highly approved ' ' and ' ' unanimously adopted ' ' 
by the Synod. 

The following is the Constitution : 

" Constitution of the Evangelical Lutheran German 
and English Synod of North Carolina and Adjacent 
States, as Revised and Enlarged at their October Ses- 
sion, 1817. 

" Article I. The first twenty-one articles of the Confession 
delivered to the assembled Diet at Augsburg, in Germany, by 
the Lutheran divines, known by the name of the Augsburg 
Confession, as extracted from the Bible, is the point of union of 
our Church. Every minister, before ordination, pledges him- 
self to the same. 

"Article II. The Synod consists of ordained ministers and 
candidates to the ministry, and is to meet annually, on Trinity 
Sunday, in rotation of counties. 

" Article III. Every congregation hath a right to send dep- 
uties, such as are in full communion of our Church, and if they 
produce a certificate of their election they are entitled to a seat 
and vote. 

"Article IV. All deputies have a right to vote, by congre- 
gations, so that every congregation has a vote, and the majority 
decides ; but the lay deputies, taken together, have no more 
votes than the number of ministers belonging to our ministry 
respecting general concerns. 

" Article V. Every Synod elects a President, Secretary, and 
Treasurer. The first two officers must be ordained ministers, 
and belong to our ministry. 

" Article VI. No person shall be admitted to administer the 
AVord, except he be recommended in writing, and, on examina- 
tion, found to be sufficiently qualified ; and not before he is 
twenty-one years of age. 

"Article VII. No preacher (except he is ordained or 
licensed by a Synod in the United States, and bearing sufficient 
credentials of the same, and of his moral conduct) is admitted 
as belonging to our Church, before he is licensed in writing, 
sealed with the ministerial seal, and signed by the President and 
countersigned by the Secretary. These licenses are only granted 
for one year, except in extraordinary cases. Every license ex- 



CONFESSIONAL HISTORY OF THE SYNOD. 31 

presses the degree of authority thereby given, and on expiration 
of the same the authority ceaseth. 

" Article VIII. The degrees of our ministry are : Catechet, 
candidate, deacon, and pastor. The first two degrees are under 
license ; the third under ordination, but confined to his congre- 
gations; the last conveys general authority, but he must have 
studied divinity in a seminary, or with an ordained minister, for 
three years, and have made tolerable progress in the classic lan- 
guages, but, in particular cases, exceptions may be admitted. 

"Article IX. It is incumbent on the Synod, as far as pos- 
sible, to provide that such congregations as have no regular min- 
isters appointed, and who apply for the same, may be served by 
visiting ministers, with all ministerial functions ; and that the 
Lord's Supper may be celebrated at least twice in each year. 
And the holy sacrament is always to be celebrated in the con- 
gregation, at the opening or meeting of a Synod, to which all 
full members of our Church, from other congregations, are to be 
invited. The President is to appoint the ministers for that pur- 
pose, if there is no settled minister in such congregation. 

"Article X. Every minister, of every grade, is to keep a 
register of baptisms, confirmations, marriages, and burials, in 
his congregation, and report the same annually to the Synod, 
with such other memorable occurrences as deserve attention. 

"Article XI. It is the duty of every preacher to instruct 
all children of our members, from twelve years old and upwards, 
in the Catechism, and to confirm them, or have them confirmed, 
in their baptismal vow, by authorized ministers, and admit 
them to the sacrament, when they are sufficiently enlightened. 
The Small Catechism of Dr. Luther, in the German language, 
and the Christian Catechism, in* the English language, are to be 
used for such instruction, and the doctrine is to be explained for 
six weeks prior to the confirmation, if possible. 

"Article XII. Only such as are baptized and (when that 
was done during infancy) confirmed, and have partaken of the 
Lord's Supper with us, can be acknowledged full members of 
the Church. 

"Article XIII. This Constitution can be altered or 
amended when two-thirds of all ministers and deputies agree." 

Now notice that Article I. of this Constitution reads thus : 
"The first twenty-one articles of the Confession, delivered to 
the assembled Diet at Augsburg, in Germany, by the Lutheran 
divines, known by the name of the Augsburg Confession, as ex- 
tracted from the Bible, is the point of union of our Church. 



2,2 HISTORY OF NORTH CAROLINA SYNOD. 

Every minister, before ordination, pledges himself to the 
same. " 

Of this, two things are important. It was the first officially 
declared specific confessional basis of the Synod, and it was the 
first formal and public avowal of the recognition of the Augs- 
burg Confession by any Lutheran Synod in America. 

In i Si 8, the Ministerium of Pennsylvania, the oldest and by 
far the largest body in America bearing the Lutheran name, in- 
augurated a movement looking to a closer union of all the 
Lutheran Synods in America. In 1819 she sent out to those 
Synods a proposed " Plan of Union." In that plan there was 
no formal confessional basis suggested, and the Bible and the 
Lutheran Confessions were not so much as named. 

In 1820, when the General Synod was formally organized, the 
North Carolina Synod was represented by Rev. G. Shober. 
Acting under instructions given by the unanimous voice of the 
Synod, at the convention held in April, 1S19, he endeavored, 
in the name of the Synod, though unsuccessfully, to secure the 
recognition of the Augsburg Confession in the plan of union, 
and in the proposed constitution for the new general body. 

Of this effort of the North Carolina Synod and the results 
flowing from it, Dr. J. W. Richard, in the Lutheran Quarterly 
for October, 1895, says : " Fortunately for the Lutheran Church 
in the United States, the New York Ministerium, which took 
part in the adoption of the Constitution at Hagerstown, in 1820, 
did not send delegates again until 1837 ; and the Pennsylvania 
Ministerium, whose delegation at Hagerstown outnumbered all 
others together, withdrew prior to the meeting Of T823, and was 
not represented again on the floor of the General Synod until 
1853, tnus giving the Lutheran Confessional Consciousness, 
which existed in the North Carolina and Maryland-Virginia 
Synods, time to grow and strengthen until the body should be- 
come Lutheran in reality as it was in name." 

As evidence of the Synod's continued advancement upon the 
principles laid down in her first Constitution, and that she in- 
tended that her pastors should be competent to teach true 
Lutheran theology, in accordance with those principles, she, in 



CONFESSIONAL HISTORY OF THE SYNOD. 33 

1846, adopted the following questions, to be propounded to all 
candidates for ordination : 

" 1. Do you believe the Scriptures of the Old and New Tes- 
taments to contain the Word of God, and that it is the only in- 
fallible rule of faith and practice ? 

"2. Do you believe that the fundamental doctrines of the 
Word of God are taught in a manner substantially correct in the 
■doctrinal articles of the Augsburg Confession ? ' ' 

This continued to be the doctrinal basis of the Synod until 
1869, when, as a further evidence of her determination to pre- 
serve and maintain her distinctive Lutheran basis, she adopted, 
unanimously, the following : 

1. 

"We believe that the Canonical Books of the Old and New 
Testaments are given by inspiration of God, and are the perfect 
and only rule of faith and practice." 



" We believe that the three general creeds, the Apostolic, 
Nicene, and Athanasian, exhibit the faith of the Church univer- 
sal, in accordance with this rule." 



" We believe that the unaltered Augsburg Confession is, in 
all its parts, in harmony with the Word of God, and is a correct 
exhibition of doctrine." 



" We believe that the Apology, the Catechisms of Luther, 
the Smalcald xArticles, and the Formula of Concord are a faith- 
ful 'development and defense of the doctrines of the Word of 
God as set forth in the Augsburg Confession." 

To this basis the Synod adhered unreservedly until 1889, 
when she, unanimously and without debate, adopted her present 
Confessional Basis, which is as follows : 

" The Evangelical Lutheran Synod of North Carolina con- 
fesses that the Canonical Books of the Old and New Testa- 
ments are the Word of God, given by inspiration of the Holy 



34 HISTORY OF NORTH CAROLINA SYNOD. 

Ghost, and are the clear, only, and sufficient rule of faith ; that 
the three general creeds, Apostles', the Nicene, and the Atha- 
nasian, exhibit the faith of the Church universal, in accordance 
with this rule ; that the unaltered Augsburg Confession is, in all 
its parts, in harmony with this rule of faith, and is a correct ex- 
hibition of its doctrine ; and that the Apology, the Larger and 
Smaller Catechisms of Luther, the Smalcald Articles, and the 
Formula of Concord are a faithful development and defense of 
the doctrines of God's Word and of the Augsburg Confession. 
All her questions concerning the faith of the Church, its min- 
isters or congregations, and the administration of the Word 
and sacraments, shall be judged and decided according to this 
rule and these Confessions. ' ' 

Thus we have briefly traced the confessional history of the 
Synod, from its beginning up to the present, and the only con- 
clusion that can be drawn is that her elaborate and unequivocal 
Lutheran Confessional Basis of to-day is but the outcome, the 
natural growth and developement of the fundamental principles- 
embodied, though ever so crudely, in her first Constitution. 

In the course of her long and eventful life it is not surprising 
if there have been those in her ranks, at different times, who' 
were unsound and un- Lutheran in faith or practice, or both. 
It has been so in nearly all Synods. But if there have been 
any such, the responsibility, the blame, should be laid upon 
them personally, and not upon the Synod. For, as such, there 
is no record of her ever having denied or rejected any doctrine 
of the Lutheran faith. She has always stood, as she stands to- 
day, squarely upon the Word of God as the rule of faith, and 
the Confessions as correct exponents of that rule. 



CHAPTER V. 

TERRITORY AND GROWTH OF THE SYNOD. 

To us, of the present day, who have always enjoyed the ad- 
vantages and blessings of Synodical relations, it seems strange 
that in the early life of our Church in America so many years 
were permitted to pass away before the congregations were or- 
ganized into Synods. But, strange as it may seem to us, it is, 
nevertheless, true, that although the first German Lutheran im- 
migrants came to Pennsylvania about 1680, and that their first 
congregations were organized very soon thereafter, yet it was 
not until sixty-eight years later, that is, 1748, that the 
Ministerium of Pennsylvania was organized. And, although 
the first Lutheran immigrants settled in New York about 
1621, and their first congregation was organized in 1664, yet it 
was not until one hundred and forty-seven years later, and 
thirty-eight years after the formation of the Ministerium of 
Pennsylvania, that is, 1786, that the Ministerium of New York 
was organized. So, too, in the territory afterward occupied by 
the North Carolina Synod. Although the first German settle- 
ments in the Piedmont section were made in 1747, and the first 
congregations were organized somewhere between then and 1766, 
yet it was not until fifty-five years after the formation of the 
Ministerium of Pennsylvania, fifty-six years after their first set- 
tlement was made, and when their first congregations were about 
forty years old, that the Synod was organized. 

Why this long delay, can be matter of conjecture only, as no 
records concerning it have been found. But when we remember 
that Rev. Nussman had succeeded, before the Revolutionary 
War, in placing the Lutheran Church in North Carolina in con- 
nection with the parent Church in Germany ; that through this 
arrangement substantial help in both men and means had been 
received, and the Church thereby greatly benefited ; that after 

(35,) 



36 HISTORY OF NORTH CAROLINA SYNOD. 

the war Nussman made strong and successful efforts to renew 
the relationship which had been severed by the war ; that his 
principal congregation, St. John's, of Cabarrus, had adopted 
resolutions and made pledges concerning the funds donated ; 
and that the congregation did not participate in the organiza- 
tion of the Synod, we are led to the inference that Rev. Nussman 
must not have favored the severing of their relations with the 
Church in Germany, and the formation of a Synod to be inde- 
pendent of all other ecclesiastical bodies. Being the senior 
minister, loved, honored, and respected by all, it was perfectly 
natural for both pastors and congregations to defer to his opinions 
and wishes, and hence the Synod was not organized until nearly 
nine years after his death. 

When, however, the Synod was organized, in 1803, the 
Church was aroused and enthused as it never had been be- 
fore. New life and hope and energy were thereby created in 
the minds of pastors and people, resulting in a rapid growth in 
numbers and strength and a wide expansion of territory. 

At the organization of the Synod, as stated in a former chap- 
ter, there were present and participating four ministers and 
fourteen lay delegates, presumably representing, at least, four- 
teen congregations. In those early days they did not publish 
the list of pastors, lay delegates, and congregations belonging 
to Synod, as we do now, and hence it is impossible for us to 
know just what congregations then constituted the Synod, and 
who the lay delegates were. 

That we may realize how rapidly the Synod grew, let us take 
a glance at those early records. 

At the Fourth Convention, held in 1806, St. John's Church, 
Cabarrus County, and Indian Creek Church were received. 

At the Eighth Convention, held in 1810, one congregation in 
North Carolina and Bethel, St. Peter's, and Zion Churches, of 
South Carolina, were received and the following preachers, 
churches, elders, deacons, and lay readers were reported as be- 
longing to the Synod : 



TERRITORY AND GROWTH OF THE SYNOD. 37 

IN ROWAN COUNTY, N. C, Rev. C. A. G. Storch, Pastor. 



Churches. 



Elders. 



Zion' s, i. e. , Organ . 



Deacons. 



Buffalo Creek, i. <?., St. 
John's, Cabarrus. 



Irish Settlement, 
Lutheran Chapel. 



Theobald Lentz. . ...... George Huthman. 

George Michael Heilig. . John Miller. 

Adam Steuerwald 'John Edelman. 

Adam Grass Nicholas Beringer. 

Nicholas Ridenauer. . . . Peter Thiem. 

lohn Beringer Paul Beringer. 

Jacob Bast Martin Blackwiilder. 

Jacob Miller John Ridohr. 

John Setzer. 

Conrad Schlup Michael Bastian. 

John Kistler. 

Tobias Guthmann. 



Pine Church, i. e., Union 



Crooked Creek Church. 
St. Peter's 



Jacob Braun. 
Andrew Bauer. 
George Froelich. 

Ludwig Hardess. 



Sear Creek, i. e., Bethel, 
Stanly County. 



John Herche. 

John Bernhard, LayiChristopher Leyerli. 
Reader I Henry Zeits. 



IN DAVIDSON COUNTY, N. C, Rev. Ludwig Markert, Pastor. 



Churches. 



Elders. 



Deacons. 



Pilgrim Church Christian Meyer Henry Conrad. 

Valentine Tag Peter Lapp. 

Beck's Church John Beck Ephraim Gass. 

David Beyrer. 

Swicegood's, i. e., Sandy Adam Schweisguth Henry Ratz. 

Creek Church John Gabel Philip Beck. 

Lau's Church. . John Gobel Ludwig Lau. 

Jacob Krieson John Philippi. 

Frieden's Church John Gebel. 

John Kob. 

IN ORANGE COUNTY, N. C. 



Churches. 




Elders. 


Deacons. 




Grave's Church, i. c. 
Paul's, Alamance.. 


St 









Churches. 



IN RANDOLPH COUNTY, N. C. 
Elders. 



Deacons. 



Richland Church John Schwartz Joseph Staler . 

Jacob Krieson, Lay 
Reader. 



38 HISTORY OF NORTH CAROLINA SYNOD. 

IN STOKES AND ROWAN COUNTIES, Rev. Gottlieb Shober, Pastor. 



Churches. 


Elders. 


Deacons. 


Muddy Creek Church. . . . 




Henry Holder. 
Samuel Vogler. 
John Krausser. 

Benjamin Ilenkel. 
Henry Clement. 










Dutchman's Creek 


Nicholas GHick 





IN LINCOLN COUNTY, N. C, Rev. Philip Henkel, Pastor. 



Churches. 


Elders. 


Deacons. 


Old Church 


John Eisenhauer. 

[ohn Stein 

Christopher Siegman.. . . 
Jacob Vollbrecht. 


Bernhard Siegman. 
John Schmidt. 

John Schmeyer. 

Jacob Klein. 
Peter Heil. 
Daniel Lutz. 


School-house Church. . . . 


Thomas Huber 


Kassner's Church, i. c, 


John Huffman 

Peter Rein. . . 


Jacob Straub. 


Lebanon Church 




Moses Baumgartner. 
George Risch. 




Ludwig Hefer 






Nicholas Eiler. 






Benjamin Weitmer. 
Jacob Hahn. 











IN SOUTH CAROLINA, Without Pastors. 



Churches. 


Elders. 


Deacons. 






George Bauknecht. 
Georye Metz. 




George Weiss 




Yost Metz 


John Weiss. 




Christopher Kaufman. . . 

Henry Kuhn. 
Samuel Bockman. 
Henry Schull. 


Jacob Rauch. 

Jacob Nonnenmacher. 




John Dreher. 



TERRITORY AND GROWTH OF THE SYNOD. 



39 



At the Ninth Convention, held in 1811, the following-named 
nine congregations, in Tennessee, served by Charles Z. Henry- 
Smith, were received : 



County. 


Churches. 


Elders. 


Sullivan 




John Shafer. 
Adam Miller. 






Sullivan 


Rollers .. 


Martin Roller. 






George Lideke. 

Abraham Shnep. 
Elias Bowman. 


Washington 






Washington 


Brownsboro 


Jacob Spohr. 
Adam Itz. 






Patterson 

Sinking Spring 






J. Damsmelzer. 
Christ. German. 






Cove Creek 






Peter Richter. 

Henry Lonas. 
Henry Mauck. 
Nicholas Gibs. 














Henry Lauer. 

Henry Thonas. 
John Maurer. 


Blount . . 









At the Tenth Convention, held in 181 2, Hopewell and Bethel 
Churches, in Stokes County, N. C, and Sandy Run Church, in 
South Carolina, were received. 

At the Eleventh Convention, held in 181 3, five congregations 
in Virginia were admitted, named as follows : 



County. 


Churches. 


Elders. 


Shenandoah 


On Hoxbiehl 








John Shenk. 
John Roller. 


Shenandoah 

Rockingham 


Solomon's. 










Shenandoah 


St. Paul's 


Frederick Bish. 






Jacob Folz. 







40 HISTORY OF NORTH CAROLINA SYNOD. 

At the Twelfth Convention, held in 1814, several congrega- 
tions in South Carolina were received. At the Thirteenth 
Convention, held in 181 5, St. Michael's in Iredell County and 
Christ's Church in Rowan County were received ; and during 
the years 18 15 and 18 16 petitions were received from various 
congregations in South Carolina, Tennessee, Mason County. 
Va., Pendleton County, Va. , Rutherford and Burke Counties, 
N. C. , Fairfield County, Ohio, and Washington County, Ind., 
requesting to be visited by ministers to administer the Holy 
Sacraments to them, or to have certain lay readers to be ex- 
amined and licensed, so as to labor in holy things among them. 

At the Fourteenth Convention, held in 18 16, it was decided 
that the names of all pastors, candidates, and catechists belong- 
ing to the Synod should be printed in the minutes. The fol- 
lowing is the list : 

Pastors.— -C. A. G. Storch, Paul Henkel, R. J. Miller, Philip 
Henkel, Ludwig Markert, Jacob Scherer, J. P. Franklow, and 
G. Dreher. 

Candidates. — D. Moser, David Henkel, Jacob Zink, Adam 
Miller, J. W. Meyer, Peter Schmucker, Andrew Henkel, Michael 
Rauch, Jost Muetze. 

Catechists. — Jacob Krieson, Philip Roth, Daniel Scherer, Jacob 
Miller, Daniel Walcher, J. E. Bell, John Dreher. 

Thus it is seen that in 181 6, thirteen years after the organiza- 
tion of the Synod, there were nine pastors, nine candidates, 
seven catechists, and about sixty congregations, numbering, per- 
haps, six thousand members. 

These were scattered over an area reaching from the Ohio 
River to the Gulf of Mexico and from the Atlantic Ocean to 
the Mississippi River, or, in other words, the whole southern 
territory now occupied by the eight Synods, constituting the 
United Synod of the South. 

Such was the statistical and territorial condition of the Synod 
at the close of the Fifteenth Convention, held in 181 7, the 
year preceding the beginning of the difficulties resulting in the 
organization of the Tennessee Synod ; and notwithstanding that 
unhappy division, the consequent falling off in numbers, and 



TERRITORY AND GROWTH OF THE SYNOD. 4 1 

the deplorable conditions that followed, the Synod reported in 
1821, the year after the actual rupture, ten pastors, four deacons, 
four candidates, six catechists, and about fifty congregations, who 
reported for the year 578 children and thirty-nine adults bap- 
tized and 189 young people confirmed. 

The years that followed were filled with wrangling and unpro- 
fitable discussions ; but the Synod, though rent by schism and 
harassed by open foes and secret enemies, pursued the even 
tenor of her way, intent upon her one great work of saving 
souls, through the ministration of the Word and sacraments. 
And God blessed her in her work, strengthening and enlarging 
her borders and increasing her usefulness year by year. In 1824 
another division took place ; this time in peace and brotherly 
love, the pastors and churches in South Carolina withdrawing 
and organizing the South Carolina Synod. 

Again, in 1842, the brethren in Virginia organized what is 
now known as the Southwest Virginia Synod. Not because of 
any difficulties or differences, but that they might the better 
cultivate their immediate field. 

From the Tennessee Synod has since gone out the Holston 
Synod, and from the South Carolina Synod have gone out the 
Mississippi Synod and the Georgia Synod. 

Thus it is seen that these Synods are the children and grand- 
children of the mother-Synod, altogether now numbering more 
than 200 pastors, nearly 500 congregations, and nearly or quite 
40,000 members. 

Through all the years that have followed from the little meet- 
ing in Salisbury until now, God has always been with the Synod, 
her "Refuge and strength, a very present help in trouble," 
blessing and prospering her in every way, and giving her souls 
as seals of her ministry, so that to-day, although she no longer 
covers the immense territory that she once did, her work being 
confined to only a part of the State of North Carolina, she num- 
bers in her fold thirty-eight pastors, sixty-two congregations, and 
nearly 8000 members, more than she ever numbered before at 
any one time. 



CHAPTER VI. 

THE RUPTURE OF 1819 AND 1820. 

Sixteen years have come and gone since the Synod was first 
organized, then numbering only four pastors and fourteen con- 
gregations. During these years many changes have taken place 
both in Church and State. Under the blessings of her Master, 
she now numbers eleven pastors, five candidates, ten catechists, 
and about sixty congregations. Fourteen times the Synod has 
assembled, many questions have been discussed, many measures 
adopted, much work undertaken, and great good accomplished. 
And through it all God has been with her, peace has reigned, 
and the Synod has been a unit upon all questions of doctrine 
and polity, with the one only exception of the question of licen- 
sure, or rather ordination. Well might it have been said, "Be- 
hold, how good and how pleasant it is for brethren to dwell 
together in unity ! ' ' 

But now, alas, after so many years of peace, a struggle begins 
that, at length, ends in the first rupture in the Lutheran Church 
in America, followed by years of bitterness and strife and alien- 
ations, the effects of which are still felt, after a lapse of more 
than three-quarters of a century. 

At first the cloud that threatened the peace of the Synod was 
but a mere speck in the Synodical horizon. But, housed in 
men's hearts and nursed by their passions, it widened and grew 
and spread until the whole sky was overcast and the storm burst 
in all its fury, carrying havoc and destruction in its mad career. 
By it, the Synod was rent in twain ; brethren, who had labored 
together in love for years, became open and avowed enemies ; 
congregations composed of those who had always lived together 
in peace and harmony were rudely shattered ; life-long friends 
and companions were alienated; the peace of many family circles 
broken up, the work of the Church interrupted, and her progress 

(42) 



THE RUPTURE OF 1819 AND 1S20. 43 

crippled and retarded, not only then and in North Carolina, but 
ever since then and in many other parts of our country. 

The causes leading up to these dreadful consequences seem so 
inadequate that the unbiased historian hesitates to record them, 
and yet they must be recorded, else how shall this be the history 
of the Synod ? 

Undoubtedly the first and principal cause was personal differ- 
ences among individual members. To understand fully, we need 
to recapitulate somewhat. 

In accordance with the customs then in vogue, during the in- 
terim of Synod, between the Tenth and Eleventh Conventions, 
that is, some time during the year 1812, two pastors had 
licensed Mr. David Henkel as catechist. At the Eleventh 
Convention, in 1S13, Mr. Henkel presented himself before 
Synod, with a petition from Lincoln County, asking for a re- 
newal of his license. Mr. Henkel was then about eighteen years 
old, the youngest man that had ever asked the Synod for a 
license, and, of course, at that time, with limited literary attain- 
ments. 

In view of these facts, the Synod, acting with due caution, 
"concluded that, if on examination he should be approved, he 
should receive authority to preach and baptize." He sustained 
the examination creditably, and accordingly he with J. P. 
Schmucker and Daniel Moser, who had been examined at the 
same time, received license for one year to preach, catechise, and 
baptize. 

In justice to Mr. Henkel, it is proper here to state, that which 
the fathers did not know, that Mr. Henkel was a man of excellent 
natural endowments, having a strong mind and an industrious 
and persevering disposition, a great lover of books, and a hard 
student, who, by his own individual efforts, in after years, 
attained to a remarkable degreee of efficiency in the ancient 
languages and in symbolical and dogmatic theology. 

The Synod having its attention drawn to the prevailing custom 
of licensure by two ministers between the sessions of Synod, 
" after much deliberation, it was concluded that no license shall 
hereafter be granted by ministers in the vacation of a Synod, as 



44 HISTORY OF NORTH CAROLINA SYNOD. 

the custom had crept in hitherto ; that at the Synod no young 
person shall be licensed to preach and baptize before examina- 
tion ; and that on every application, especially the first, it shall 
be decided whether the applicant shall also be licensed to bap- 
tize ; that if such applicant thereafter approve himself faithful, 
diligent, and qualified, and he be adopted by congregations as 
their teacher, he shall then be admitted a full candidate for the 
holy office, and after examination receive written authority to 
administer the holy sacraments in such congregations, or in those 
to which he may be appointed by Synod, and nowhere else — and 
that this authority shall only be in force for one year, or to the 
next Synod." 

Mr. Henkel continued as catechist for two years, his license 
being renewed by Synod in 1814. In 18 15 Mr. Henkel was 
advanced to licensure for one year as candidate. At this con- 
vention it was decided that, "In case a young servant of the 
Church, that is, a candidate, be overcome by indolence, loss of 
courage, care or anxiety for daily bread, etc., such candidate be 
reduced to a catechist. If he be a catechist, he shall be put out 
of office, unless it be that sickness or other circumstances may 
be the cause and excuse ; for it is possible only to those Avho 
meet the requirements laid down, and who have the gift and train- 
ing necessary, coupled with a pure life and with industry, to be 
promoted in the holy office." 

In 1 816 Mr. Henkel went to Synod expecting to receive 
ordination, but the discussion over the licensure question was 
on, and ordination was not granted. The question had arisen 
in Lincoln County ; some advocating that no one should be per- 
mitted to administer the sacrament without having been fully 
ordained, whilst the Synod, as well as the Pennsylvania Synod, 
whose opinion the North Carolina Synod had asked on this sub- 
ject, declared and practiced that a candidate could perform all 
ministerial acts before he was ordained, simply on the authority 
of his being licensed by Synod to do so. 

At length, to satisfy the petitioners from Lincoln, and only for 
this one year, the President, Rev. Storch, dissenting, all the 
candidates, including Mr. Henkel, were handed their usual 



THE RUPTURE OF 1819 AND 1820. 45 

licenses with full powers, with the benediction and imposition 
of hands, but were not regarded as ordained ministers. 

In 181 7 Mr. Henkel's license was renewed with the same 
powers. In 1818 there was no convention of Synod on account 
of the change of the time of meeting. 

In 1 8 19, for reasons that will be explained below, the Synod 
met in St. John's Church, Cabarrus County, some weeks earlier 
than the time fixed in the Constitution. 

At this convention many complaints were lodged against Mr. 
Henkel, and much time was consumed in examining the charges. 
Some of them were proven to be true, whilst others were not. 
And, in accordance with the regulations adopted in 18 15, he was 
reduced from the position of candidate to that of catechist, 
and 'given a license for twelve months, with the provision that 
" if, at the expiration of six months, he can bring a written state- 
ment from his congregations that peace among them was restored, 
and no more serious complaints be presented against him, then 
the President of Synod shall grant him a license as candidate." 
That is to say, he should be restored to his former grade. This 
action of Synod was unanimous, and Mr. Henkel, on the floor of 
Synod, expressed himself as being satisfied with the action, and 
promised to do better in the future. 

On the following Trinity Sunday, the time fixed in the Consti- 
tution for the regular annual meeting, but now no longer the time 
for that year, because the Synod had already held its annual 
meeting some weeks before, the Rev. Philip Henkel, Candidate 
Joseph E. Bell, Catechist David Henkel, and seven lay delegates 
came together at the place appointed for the meeting of Synod, 
St. John's Church, Cabarrus County, and where Synod had already 
met, and declared themselves the Synod of North Carolina, and 
contrary to the regulation of Synod, which said : ■' Hereafter no 
one receive full ministerial authority except alone by the Synod, 
and that after an examination ;" and, knowing that David Hen- 
kel was under censure and on probation, and, therefore ineligible 
to ordination, Philip Henkel, upon his own authority and in de- 
fiance of all law and order, ordained Candidate J. E. Bell and 
Catechist David Henkel to the office of pastor. 



46 HISTORY OF NORTH CAROLINA SYNOD. 

At the next convention of Synod, held in 1820, in Lincolnton, 
in a church served by David Henkel, the Synod refused to recog- 
nize the unlawful ordination,' and, in consequence, there was a 
hot, spirited discussion — the Synod on one side, with Philip and 
David Henkel on the other. There seemed to be no possibility 
of a reconciliation ; and, as David Henkel held the house by 
right of his pastorship, in the interest of peace, the Synod ad- 
journed to the hotel, near by, and continued the meeting. 
During this convention Candidate Bell presented' himself before 
Synod, acknowledged his error in submitting to ordination at the 
hands of Rev. Philip Henkel contrary to the regulations of Synod, 
and asked to be reinstated ; pledging himself to abide by the 
Constitution and decisions of Synod. The Synod then decided 
by unanimous vote, first, that Candidate Bell's ordination was ille- 
gal and invalid, not only acccording to the rules and regulations 
of this Synod, but according to the rules of all Christian denomi- 
nations ; and, second, that in view of his repentance and confes- 
sion, and his promise to remain loyal to the Lutheran Church and 
faithful to his ordination vows, his ordination be made valid by 
this Synod, and he be furnished with a certificate to that effect. 

But the ordination of David Henkel was never recognized as 
valid, he having never returned to allegiance to the North Caro- 
lina Synod. 

The friends and followers of David Henkel, after a short ses- 
sion in the church, adjourned to meet again the following July. 

Taking all this into consideration, we can easily understand 
how a man of his disposition and aspirations would become per- 
sonally offended with those who, as he might have expressed it, 
held him back from the realization of his long-cherished hopes 
and desires, and how that personal offense might lead him to 
antagonize the Synod, and, eventually, to lead in the rupture, as 
he did. And the fact is, that in all his after-recorded utterances 
in opposition to the North Carolina Synod, as well as to indi- 
vidual members of the Synod, those deep personal differences 
stand out bold and prominent. 

The only reason assigned for ignoring the Synod when it met 
in April, and afterward claiming themselves to be the Synod, was. 



THE RUPTURE OF 1819 AND 1820. 47 

that the Synod had violated her Constitution in changing the 
time of meeting. 

The Synod was organized in May, and had held one meeting 
in April, one in August, one irt September, and ten in October 
up to 1 81 7. Then, because the fall time was often sickly, 
the time for the annual meeting was fixed on Trinity Sunday. 
Synod met in 1817 on the third Sunday in October, and, as there 
would be only about six months until the next Trinity Sunday, it 
was decided to hold no meeting in 1818, but to begin the new 
order by meeting on Trinity Sunday, 1819, thus allowing eighteen 
months to lapse between the two conventions. 

From the beginning the older pastors had felt the necessity of 
a closer union with the other Lutheran Synods in America, and 
as early as 181 1 Revs. Storch and Shober advocated the opening 
of a correspondence with the Pennsylvania Synod, with this ob- 
ject in view. But, so far as the records show, nothing came of 
it, and nothing more was heard of it until 1818, the year in 
which there was no meeting of the North Carolina Synod, when 
the Pennsylvania Synod sent out an official invitation asking all 
the Synods to send deputies to her next annual meeting, which 
was to be held in Baltimore during Trinity week, 18 19, for the 
purpose of considering the necessity, propriety, and feasibility of 
organizing a General Synod. 

Realizing the necessity and advantages of such an organization 
and the desirability of the North Carolina Synod being repre- 
sented in the meeting, and in order that delegates might be 
elected and instructed, the officers, after consultation with the 
majority of the members, called the Synod together on April 
26th instead of on Trinity Sunday, which that year occurred some 
six weeks later. Accordingly, the Synod met, there being present 
six of the eight pastors, three of the nine candidates, six of the 
seven catechists, and twelve lay delegates, perhaps as full an 
attendance as had ever been at any meeting of the Synod, and 
certainly a large majority of the Synod. David Henkel was 
present, and was tried on the charges preferred against him. 
Revs. Paul and Philip Henkel and Candidate Bell were absent. 
These thre'e, that is, David Henkel, Philip Henkel, and J. E. Bell, 



48 HISTORY OF NORTH CAROLINA SYNOD. 

afterward claimed that the changing of the time of meeting was 
unlawful, a violation of the Constitution, and, as already stated, 
met on Trinity Sunday, and proclaimed themselves the Synod. 
That it would have been better and wiser for those in favor of 
the General Synod to have possessed their souls in patience until 
the fixed time for the meeting of Synod, no one will question ; 
but that it was an assumption of power, or in any sense a viola- 
tion of the Constitution, is not so easily established, because : 

1. Although the Constitution made no provisions for changing 
the time of meeting on an emergency, yet the officers pursued 
what should be deemed as the lawful and parliamentary course, 
of first consulting both pastors and congregations, obtaining the 
consent of the majority before changing the time. 

2. When they came together the very first business attended 
to was a statement by the President why the time had been 
changed, and why they had been called together "at that time, 
and the question put, demanding that they should say whether 
or not this was the regular annual meeting of the Synod for 
this year? Whereupon it was unanimously agreed and "al- 
lowed and sanctioned ' ' that this was the regular annual meet- 
ing for this year ; David Henkel being present, and voting in 
the affirmative, with all the rest, for there was no dissenting vote. 
On the other hand, although the Constitution did not fix the 
number necessary for a quorum, yet when the opposite party 
came together, on Trinity Sunday, their number was so small 
that they did not even claim a quorum ; and hence they were 
not competent to transact any business in the name of the 
Synod. 

3. The very fact that this party met in the following July and 
organized another Synod under another name is an acknowledg- 
ment of their mistake, and that- the body that met on April 26th, 
1 81 9, was the regular annual convention of the North Carolina 
Synod. 

Opposition to the General Synod has been declared to have 
been another cause leading up to the ruptufe. But the fact is, 
that if there had ever been any discussion of the question on the 
floor of the Synod, prior to the rupture, there is no record of it ; 



THE RUPTURE OF 1819 AND 1820. 49 

and no definite steps were taken looking to the organization of 
such a body until 1818, the year when there was no meeting of the 
North Carolina Synod ; and at the first meeting of the North 
Carolina Synod, after the call from the Pennsylvania Synod, it 
has been shown above that the North Carolina Synod was unani- 
mously in favor of it. 

That Revs. Philip and David Henkel and those who asso- 
ciated themselves with them were afterward opposed to the Gen- 
eral Synod is a matter of history. That they may have been, 
and probably were before, no one will dispute. But the records 
show that David Henkel, the man who became the leader of the 
rupture, and who afterward was so bitter against the General 
Synod, voted in favor of it upon the only opportunity that he had 
to vote upon the question whilst he was a member of the North 
Carolina Synod, and that, too, only six weeks before his open 
break with the Synod and his avowed hostility to the General 
Synod. 

Doctrinal differences have been assigned as another cause lead- 
ing up to the rupture. But there is no official record of any 
doctrinal differences in the North Carolina Synod until the time 
of its meeting in Lincolnton, in 1820, when the rupture was 
actually accomplished. That there may have been such differ- 
ences between individuals is not at all unlikely, but if there were 
such in the North Carolina Synod there is no record of it ; and 
hence it must have been either unknown to the Synod or not 
thought of sufficient importance to demand its attention. 

True, there had arisen a difference of opinion on the question 
of licensure and ordination ; but this was not then considered, 
and really was not a doctrinal difference, but rather a question 
as to the wisest plan to pursue in providing men for the work of the 
ministry, for which there was such a constant and ever-increasing 
demand. The difference was not as to grades in the ministry, 
all were agreed as to that, but as to whether candidates should be 
ordained before being authorized to perform all ministerial acts, 
or simply receive a certificate of licensure. The question origi- 
nated in Lincoln County. The following year, when the vote 
was put as to whether or not they should continue the license 



50 HISTORY OF NORTH CAROLINA SYNOD. 

system as heretofore, there was but one vote cast in the negative,, 
and that was by Rev. R. J. Miller. 

That there were doctrinal differences at the time of the rup- 
ture and afterward there are abundant records to prove ; and 
hence it would be more in accordance with the published official 
records to say that doctrinal differences grew out of the rupture 
rather than that they were the cause of it. 

In the years following the rupture the controversy and conten- 
tion centred in and around the book called "Luther," written 
by Rev. G. Shober, at the appointment of Synod. Concerning 
this book and its contents there are some remarkable facts stand- 
ing upon record : 

i. In-1816 the Rev. Philip Henkel offered a resolution, which 
was adopted, to the effect that "An extract of all our protocol 
accounts and all our regulations be printed in the English lan- 
guage, in view of the fact that our Church is still unknown 
among the English-speaking people." The Rev. G. Shober was 
appointed to do this work. 

2. In 181 7 Mr. Shober presented his manuscript to the 
Synod, and a special committee was appointed to examine and 
pass judgment upon it. This committee consisted of Revs. 
Philip Henkel and R. J. Miller and Candidate J. E. Bell. Be- 
fore the final adjournment of Synod this committee reported 
that they had examined the manuscript, and "do highly ap- 
prove of its contents, and recommend it to be published, be- 
lieving that it will have a beneficial effect throughout our con- 
gregations, and give succinct information to other Christians 
what the Lutheran Church is. ' ' 

Upon the report of this committee the Synod unanimously 
voted to have fifteen hundred copies of the book published. 

3. Revs. Philip and David Henkel, who were afterward its 
greatest opponents, heartily endorsed the book, voted to have 
fifteen hundred copies printed, and zealously circulated it up 
until the~rupture in 1820, that is, for three years, and that they 
did not make settlement for the books placed in their hands until 
the Synod passed a resolution instructing that they be forced by 
law to do so. From all this it is very evident that there were no 



THE RUPTURE OF 1819 AND 1820. 51 

officially recognized doctrinal differences in the North Carolina 
Synod until the time of the actual rupture. 

It is a fact well known and lamented by all that, for many 
years following the first Lutheran settlements in America, the 
Church had gradually departed more and more away from a 
sound Lutheran basis, until indifference to and unsoundness in 
doctrine, together with laxity in practice, had become the pre- 
vailing features of Lutheranism. 

It is also a fact well known and rejoiced in that, with the 
organization of the North Carolina Synod, there began a gradual 
awakening to a realization of this departure and a correspond- 
ing gradual return to the true Lutheran position. 

At the time of th.e rupture, neither those who withdrew nor 
those who remained true to the Synod had yet reached that true 
Lutheran position. They were all together on the way, some, 
no doubt, in advance of others, but all reaching for the desired 
goal. 

The rupture, when it came, emphasized these facts, and did 
much to lead all to a closer and more critical study of the 
Lutheran Church and her doctrines. But it is a lamentable fact 
that on both sides a bad spirit was often manifested, and much 
of the controversy was puerile and unprofitable in the extreme. 



CHAPTER VII. 

THE LICENSE SYSTEM. 

One of the most urgent reasons for the organization of the 
North Carolina Synod was that its ministers might be in a better 
condition to supply the constantly increasing demand for pastors 
to minister to the spiritual necessities of the churches. Time 
and again had urgent petitions been sent to the Synod of Penn- 
sylvania and elsewhere asking for pastors to supply their vacant 
congregations, but the same paucity of ministers existed every- 
where in America ; where, as yet, there were no Lutheran col- 
leges and theological seminaries, where men could be prepared 
for the Gospel ministry. It was also very difficult to secure pas- 
tors from Germany, and, hence, they realized that some plan 
must be adopted by which they could themselves prepare pious 
men at home for this work, until such time when the necessary 
institutions of learning could be established in this country. 

It was not their design to provide an easy method of entering 
the ministry, nor did they encourage uneducated men or men of 
doubtful character to apply. In accordance with the teachings of 
the Scriptures and the practice of the Lutheran Church in Ger- 
many, they believed in and wanted a thoroughly educated ministry, 
and their ultimate aim was to secure and perpetuate such a min- 
istry in the churches of the North Carolina Synod. But, neces- 
sarily, years must pass before they could reach their ideal, and 
hence that they might supply the already existing churches and 
occupy the ever-widening field opening to them some imme- 
diate measures must be adopted. 

Following the example of the Pennsylvania Synod, they 
adopted what came to be called "The License System," a 
policy purely American, so far as the Lutheran Church was con- 
cerned. Under this system, pious laymen, who appeared to have 
the necessary natural endowments, were selected and licensed to 

(52) 



THE LICENSE SYSTEM. 53 

perform certain specified ministerial functions, for some fixed length 
of time, within prescribed limits, subject to the approval of Synod, 
while they were pursuing their studies, preparing for ordination, 
always under the supervision and instruction of one or more 
ordained ministers of the Synod. 

At the First Annual Convention of Synod, held in Lin- 
colnton, N. C, October 17th, 1803, Mr. Philip Henkel appeared 
asking for ordination, and at the Second Convention, held in 
Leonard's Church, near Lexington, N. C, John Michael Rickert 
and Ludwig Markert applied for license. Thus, at the very 
beginning of the life of the Synod, this question of licen- 
sure pressed itself upon them, and as long as practiced, at every 
convention, thereafter, it came before the Synod in some way 
or form. 

At first there were no published definite regulations for the 
work ; they simply met each case as it came before them, adopt- 
ing that which, under the circumstances, seemed for the best. 
But as time advanced, and the work grew more and more in 
their hands, they began to realize the necessity for some definite 
fixed laws and regulations by which it should be governed. 

Up to 18 1 3 it had grown to be the custom to allow any two 
ministers at their own will and upon their own judgment, be- 
tween the conventions of Synod, to license young men to preach 
until the meeting of Synod ; but that year, " after much delibera- 
tion, it was concluded that no license shall hereafter be granted 
by ministers in the vacation of a Synod. That at the Synod no 
young person shall be licensed to preach and baptize before 
examination, and that on every application, especially the first, 
it shall be decided whether the applicant shall also be licensed 
to baptize ; that if such applicant thereafter approve himself faith- 
ful, diligent, and qualified, and he be received by congregations 
as their spiritual teacher, he shall then be admitted as a full 
candidate for the holy office, and, after examination, receive 
written authority to administer the Holv Sacraments in such 
congregations, or in those to which he may be appointed by 
Synod, and nowhere else, and that this authority shall only be 
in force for one year, or to the next Synod. ' ' 



54 HISTORY OF NORTH CAROLINA SYNOD. 

At the Convention of 1814, these regulations were reaffirmed 
as the rule or law of the Synod, and the following added : "That 
hereafter no uneducated person shall receive license to preach' 
until he has studied with one of our pastors, and is twenty-one 
years of age. " 

At the 'Convention of 1815 k became the law of Synod that 
if a '•' candidate be overcome by indolence, loss of courage, care 
or anxiety for daily bread, etc., such candidate be reduced to an 
exhorter or catechist. If he be a catechist, he shall be put out of 
office." 

The Synod, thus drawing a distinction between candidate and 
catechist, brought out at the next convention, in 1 816, an of- 
ficial statement as to what was called grades in the ministry, as 
follows : 

" 1. CatecJiists, who are still pursuing a course of study, and 
in addition to that, at the same time, are preaching, baptizing, 
and catechising, but are under the supervision of the Minis- 
terium, and are being instructed by one ordained minister." 

"2. Candidates, who perform all ministerial acts, but are lim- 
ited to certain congregations." 

"3. Deacons, who differ from candidates only in ordination, 
but otherwise have no greater rights and privileges." 

"4. Pastors, who have for three years enjoyed systematic in- 
struction under an ordained minister, and who have also studied 
the languages somewhat. ' ' 

From the very beginning of the Synod there appear to have 
been different opinions held upon this question of licensure and 
ordination ; some holding that no one should be permitted to 
preach or administer the sacraments without full ordination, and 
that all should be ordained so soon as allowed to begin minis- 
terial work, even though young, inexperienced, and with very 
limited attainments ; whilst others held that no one should be 
^ordained until he was fully prepared, or as much so as the cir- 
cumstances would admit ; and that it was both Biblical and Luth- 
eran that a written authority or license was equally as valid as the 
imposition of hands. 

In an effort to reach a settlement of the question, the Synod 
officially laid the matter before the Ministerium of Pennsylvania 




REV. DANIEL J. HAUER, D. D. 

Licensed A. D. 1826, by North Carolina 
Synod. Ordained A. D. 1828, by North Caro- 
lina Synod. Still living when this book was 
written in 1901 ; has since died, in his 96th year. 



THE LICENSE SYSTEM. 55 

.asking for its views and practice. The following was the reply 
received : 

" Upon motion, the ordained ministers were requested, ac- 
cording to last year's resolution of the Ministerium, to express 
their opinion on the question, as submitted by the Carolina Min- 
isterium for an answer ; namely, Whether candidates have the 
right to perform all ministerial acts without previous imposition 
of hands ? 

" Several gave their opinion verbally and some in writing; 
whereupon it was unanimously concluded that, according to the 
Bible and church history, a written permission (license) is just 
as valid as the imposition of hands ; that therefore our minis- 
terial arrangement is not contrary to the order of the Evangelical 
Lutheran Church, and that therefore candidates, when they are 
licensed, can perform all actus ministeriales with a good con- 
science. ' ' 

This view was the position held by the large majority of 
Synod, but at this convention, that is, 1816, not because of 
a change of opinion, nor an acknowledgment of error, but solely 
in the interest of peace, it was agreed that for that year all licen- 
tiates should receive their written license papers, with a bene- 
diction and the imposition of hands. In 181 7 the subject was 
again discussed under the following form, viz.: "Shall the rule 
and regulation we have been observing when granting permisson 
to candidates to administer the sacraments " (that is, without 
ordination) " be continued or not ? " 

The conclusion reached was practically unanimous in the 
affirmative ; that is, not to ordain, there being but one vote in 
the negative by Rev. R. J. Miller. 

This continued to be the rule and regulation of the Synod for 
many years, the Synod gradually enlarging and developing the 
system as circumstances demanded, until, in 1846, the following 
was embodied as an article of her Constitution : 

" Chapter XI. 

" Examination and Licensure of Candidates. 

"Section i. The examination shall be conducted by a com- 
mittee of two or more ordained ministers appointed for the pur- 
pose at the time. As these examinations may be interesting and 



56 HISTORY OF NORTH CAROLINA SYNOD. 

useful to the whole Ministerium, it is recommended that they be 
performed before the whole body." 

"Section 2. After the examination by the committee every 
member of the Ministerium has a right to ask the applicant any 
additional questions." 

" Section 3. The examination ought to embrace the following 
subjects, viz.: Personal Piety and the Motives of the Applicant 
for Seeking the Holy Office, the Greek and Hebrew Scriptures,, 
the Evidences of Christianity, Natural and Revealed Theology, 
Church History, Pastoral Theology, the Rules of Sermonizing, 
and Church Government." 

"Section 4. The ceremony of licensure shall be performed 
as follows : An address from the President as prescribed in the 
liturgy ; he shall read the duties and privileges of the licentiate, 
and then propose to him the following questions : 

" 1 . Do you believe the Scriptures of the Old and New Testa- 
ment to contain the Word of God, and that it is the only infalli- 
ble rule of faith and practice ? 

"2. Do you believe that the fundamental doctrines of the 
Word of God are taught in a manner substantially correct in the 
doctrinal articles of the Augsburg Confession ? 

"3. Do you promise by the aid of God faithfully to perform 
all the duties of a Christian minister, and to submit yourself to 
the rules of government and discipline of this body so long as 
you remain a member of it ? " 

"Section 5. These questions being answered in the affirma- 
tive, the President offers up a suitable prayer, delivers him his 
license, and concludes with a short address as directed in the 
liturgy." 

"Section 6. During the recess of the Synod the President 
may extend license to candidates who may come well recom- 
mended, and whom on proper examination he may deem quali- 
fied to discharge the duties of the ministry : provided, however, 
that the extension of license in such case be not in conflict with 
the provision of Section 6, Chapter X." 

" Section 7. All licenses shall extend to the next annual meet- 
ing of the Ministerium, and shall be renewed as a matter of 
course, whether the licentiate be present. or not, unless satis- 
factory reasons are known to the Ministerium which render a re- 
newal inexpedient ; and if, for any reason, no meeting be held at 
the appointed time, the licenses granted by said Ministerium 
shall remain in force until revoked at a subsequent meeting." 

" Section 8. If a licentiate after some time of probation does, 
in the judgment of the Ministerium, prove himself unqualified for 
the duties of the ministry, his license shall be withdrawn." 



THE LICENSE SYSTEM. 57 

This continued to be the law of the Synod until 1869, when, 
upon recommendation of the President, Rev. L. A. Bikle, D. D., 
the following action was taken : 

" Inasmuch as we can discover no authority in the Word of 
God for the licensure system, nor any warrant for the same in 
our Lutheran articles of faith and practice, and, as it has only 
been introduced in this country as a provisional custom for the 
speedy supply of ministers, therefore we submit the following 
resolutions : 

"Resolved, That our Constitution be so amended that from 
this day forward we abolish the practice of licensing candidates 
for the ministry before their ordination. 

"Resolved, That we will ordain no candidates coming from 
our Church, or any sister denomination, whose education is not 
equal, at least, to the close of the Sophomore Class studies in 
any college, and a two years' course in a Lutheran theological 
seminary. 

" Resolved, That these changes shall not be regarded as affect- 
ing our present licentiates, who shall be permitted to enjoy the 
privileges, and prepare for ordination, as before provided." 

The following year, that is, 1870, the Constitution was re- 
vised and the license system abolished. At that time there were 
three young men under license, viz.: J. H. Fesperman, R. L. 
Brown, and W. R. Ketchie. These were ordained in 1871, 
and were the last licentiates that the Synod has had. From the 
beginning up to' that time, the Synod had eighty licentiates. 



CHAPTER VIII. 

THE SYNOD'S CONNECTION WITH THE GENERAL BODIES OF THE 

CHURCH. 

During the early period of the North Carolina Synod, many 
disintegrating influences were at work, threatening the life of the 
Lutheran Church in America. Prominent among these were 
the rationalistic tendencies in the Ministerium of New York, 
the unionistic efforts with the German Reformed Church, prin- 
cipally in Pennsylvania, and the attempts of the Episcopalians 
in North Carolina to draw the Synod into their connection. 

Surrounded with such influences for years, it is not at all sur- 
prising that the Lutheran Church drifted more and more into 
the whirl of a nondescript unionism, then so common, and 
further and further away from the moorings of true Lutheran 
faith until, to the more thoughtful and conservative, a crisis 
seemed to be at hand, demanding the taking of some steps that 
would counteract these baneful influences and save the Lutheran 
Church in America from utter disintegration. 

A union of all the Lutheran Synods in America into one general 
body seemed to them to be the one thing necessary to accom- 
plish the desired end. To the Ministerium of Pennsylvania be- 
longs the honor of having initiated this work. As early as 1807 
she sent a letter to the North Carolina Synod urging the neces- 
sity of a closer union of the different Synods for mutual protec- 
tion and assistance. Nothing definite, however, came of it at 
that time for the reasons stated in the following action of the 
North Carolina Synod, taken in 181 2 : 

"A fervent wish being expressed to enter into nearer and 
more cordial connection with the brethren professing our faith in 
Pennsylvania, a letter of the year 1807, addressed to our min- 
istry, from the ministry of Pennsylvania, then in Synod assembled, 
was read. We felt sorrow that because in said and the succeed- 

(58) 



CONNECTION WITH GENERAL BODIES OF THE CHURCH. 59 

ing year no full Synod had here assembled. The same had been 
mislaid, and the receipt never acknowledged and the same never 
answered. 

"Revs. Storch and Shober were hereupon appointed in the 
name of this ministry to answer the said letter. ' ' 

.Here again the matter rested, nothing further being done for 
several years. But that was the germ, planted by the Spirit of 
God, out of and from which has come all that has been accom- 
plished in the line of general work. The seed was sown ; time, 
with the blessings of God, developed it into a thrifty plant that 
has brought forth abundant fruit to the lasting good of the whole 
Lutheran Church in America. 

The next step in the work was in 18 18, when a call was issued 
by the Ministerium of Pennsylvania, asking that representatives 
from the different Synods be assembled in Baltimore, Md., at 
the time of the regular annual meeting of the Ministerium, 
during Trinity week, 1819, for the purpose of considering a plan 
to be proposed for the closer union of all the Evangelical 
Lutheran Synods in America. 

In response to this call the North Carolina Synod held " That 
toward such a union of our Church, in this extensive country, 
all possible assistance ought to be rendered on our part," and 
elected her Secretary, the Rev. G. Shober, to attend the meet- 
ing, authorizing him, under certain conditions, to favor, in the 
name of the Synod, the formation of the proposed union. 

When the North Carolina Synod convened in 1820, at Lin- 
colnton, N. C. , Rev. Shober reported that he had attended the 
meeting, and that a plan of union had been agreed upon, which 
was submitted for the consideration of Synod. After a thorough 
and careful examination and discussion of the plan it was found 
to be not entirely satisfactory to the Synod ; but, in view of the 
universally recognized necessity for such a general union, it was, 
at length, adopted by a more than two-thirds majority vote, and 
two ministers and two laymen were elected to represent the Synod 
in a meeting to be held at Hagerstown, Md., on the 2 2d of the 
following October, for the purpose of effecting an organization. 
Two of these, Revs. G. Shober and P. Schmucker, attended the 



60 HISTORY OF NORTH CAROLINA SYNOD. 

meeting, and, as stated in a former chapter, endeavored, in the 
name of the North Carolina Synod, to secure a recognition of 
the Augsburg Confession in both the plan of union and the Con- 
stitution submitted at that time for adoption ; and, although 
they failed in their efforts, the Synod, after careful and prayer- 
ful consideration, decided to remain in the union, thereby exert- 
ing a strong and telling influence in favor of confessional 
Lutheranism. 

For forty-two years the North Carolina Synod held its place 
as an integral part of the General Synod, taking an active and 
prominent part in all of its deliberations and work, until the war 
between the States drove the Synods of the South to the neces- 
sity of forming another general organization. 

In 1 86 1 the North Carolina Synod met in Wilmington, N. C. 
At this convention a special committee on " Church Relations," 
consisting of Revs. D. H. Bittle, J. A. Linn, and S. Rothrock, 
presented the following preamble and resolutions, which were 
unanimously adopted : 

"Whereas, In the distracted condition of our once happy 
country, we deem it impracticable to send our delegates to the 
next meeting of the General Synod, about to convene at Lan- 
caster, Pa. ; and, feeling that other Synods South are in a similar 
situation with this body, therefore," 

' ' Resolved, That we recommend a convention of all Southern 
delegates to the General Synod to meet at Salisbury, N. C, 
on Thursday, preceding the third Sabbath in May, 1862, for the 
purpose of endorsing the proceedings of the next meeting of the 
General Synod, if practicable ; otherwise to take such steps as 
may best promote the future harmony and prosperity of that por- 
tion of the Church represented by the absent delegates. ' ' 

'■'■Resolved, That we hereby commission our present delegates 
to the General Synod to attend the said convention." 

' ' Itesolved, That the Corresponding Secretary of this body 
be instructed to inform all our Synods in the South of this action 
and ask their co-operation." 

At the meeting of Synod held in Organ Church, in 1862, the 
Salisbury Convention not yet having been held, the following 
additional action was taken, viz.: 




REV. DANIEL I. DREHER. 



CONNECTION WITH GENERAL BODIES OF THE CHURCH. 6 1 

"Whereas, This Synod was formerly connected with the 
General Synod of the United States of America, in which we 
are represented by delegates, we have now arrived at the 
solemn conviction that it is essential to the good of our Church 
and the glory of God that the Evangelical Lutheran Churches 
of these Confederate States withdraw all connection with the 
Northern General Synod, and by this solemn and unanimous act 
declare our connection as a Synod dissolved." 

" Resolved, That we are in favor of forming a General Synod 
of the Confederate States, on the basis of the Augsburg Confes- 
sion, and that our delegates elected to the convention to be held 
in Salisbury, N. C, in this month, be empowered to vote for 
such an organization." 

" Resolved, That in the event of the formation of a Southern 
General Synod, our delegates be empowered to represent us in 
that Synod." 

In pursuance of these resolutions, the following were elected 
as delegates, viz.: As Principals, Revs. D. I. Dreher, J. A. 
Linn, and G. D. Bernheim, and Messrs. C. Melchor, P. A. Sif- 
ferd, and R. Winecoff ; and, as Alternates, Revs. William Artz, 
J. D. Sheck, and S. Rothrock, and Messrs. L. G. Heilig, J. 
Shimpoch, and M. Barringer. 

The meeting was held at the appointed time and the Southern 
General Synod was organized, the North Carolina Synod having 
the honor of initiating the movement. 

Although the Southern General Synod did not accomplish all 
that had been hoped for it, and although the union was only par- 
tial, yet the North Carolina Synod continued to work in harmony 
with it until 1870, when its delegation, upon returning from the 
meeting held in Winchester, A^a., submitted the following report : 

" The undersigned, elected to represent this body in the Sixth 
Convention of the General Synod in North America, would re- 
spectfully report that they attended said convention, which was 
held in Winchester, Va., commencing June 9th, 1S70. 

" Nothing of special interest was transacted. Your delegates 
cannot say that they were forcibly struck with the efficiency of 
the General Synod. There seems to be a disposition on the part 
of several District Synods to propose and adopt important 
measures for selfish purposes and not for the general welfare of 
our Church South. They apparently forget that said body is a 



62 HISTORY OF NORTH CAROLINA SYNOD. 

ge?ieral body, organized to legislate for the benefit of the whole 
Church, and not for the promotion of private or local interests. 
Such ' clannishness,' if continued, it must be evident to every 
reflecting mind, will not only impair the future usefulness of the 
General Synod, but eventually prove its destruction. 

" Will it not be well to inquire, at this time, what advantage to 
the Church will it be to continue in connection with a body 
which has, in all probability, served its day? 

"Signed by L. A. Bikle, Chairman, 

" G. D. Bernheim, 
" C. H. Bernheim, 
" S. Scherer, 

"P. A. SlFFERD, 

"P. N. Heilig." 

This report was unanimously adopted and the Synod at once 
severed its relations with the Southern General Synod. 
In 1 87 1 the Synod adopted the following: 

' ' Resolved, That we deprecate the causes that have produced 
divisions in our beloved Zion, and we pray God that all such 
divisions may speedily be healed. 

" Resolved, That we stand prepared to be governed by the 
indications of the great Head of the Church, in reference to any 
general organization, sound in the faith, that is likely to bind the 
Church in the unity of the Spirit and the bond of peace." 

Then for nine years, or until 1880, she stood independent of 
all general bodies, devoting her energies almost exclusively to 
the cultivation of her own field. 

But this state of affairs was not at all in accordance with her 
long-established principles, and, as time passed, she came more 
and more to realize her abnormal position. Accordingly, in 
1880, the following action was taken : 

" Resolved, That Rev. Dr. L. A. Bikle be sent by this Synod 
as a Commissioner to the Evangelical Lutheran General Synod 
of North America, at its approaching meeting, to be held in 
Richmond, A r a., to inquire into the doctrinal position of that 
body, with a view to an organic union with it." 

Dr. Bikle accepted the commission, attended the meeting, 
and, in 1881, reported favorably, and the Synod again became a 
part of the Southern General Synod, in active co-operation. 



CONNECTION WITH GENERAL BODIES OF THE CHURCH. 63 

During all these years, reaching back to the first organization 
of the Northern General Synod, the Tennessee Synod had al- 
ways remained an independent body. 

In 1872 the Holston Synod had withdrawn from the Southern 
General Synod, and, in 1874, had united with the General 
Council. 

It was felt to be very desirable that the whole Lutheran Church 
in the South should be united into one general body, and, in 
1883, efforts began to be made that finally resulted in the call- 
ing for a Diet, to meet at Salisbury, N. C, in November, 1884, 
for the purpose of considering the possibility of effecting such 
a union. 

The North Carolina Synod did its full part in the Diet, which 
unanimously adopted a confessional basis that is soundly Scrip- 
tural and genuinely Lutheran. 

The Diet then adjourned, to meet in Roanoke City, Va. , at 
the time of the regular meeting of the Southern General Synod, 
in 18S5. 

At that time and place, after mature deliberation, the South- 
ern General Synod was merged into the "United Synod in the 
South," all the Synods of the South entering into that organiza- 
tion. In this general body, the third in which the North Caro- 
lina Synod has been largely instrumental in organizing, she still 
exerts a strong, conservative influence. 

Thus it is seen that the North Carolina Synod has been iden- 
tified with the general work of the Church from the very begin- 
ning, and that her influence has been given in favor of sound 
conservative Lutheranism. 



CHAPTER IX. 

THE EDUCATIONAL WORK OF THE SYNOD. 

The Lutheran Church has always been an educational church. 
Ignorance and superstition were things that Luther fought with 
all his might, while the diffusion of light and knowledge was 
that for which he always labored.' True to her birthright, the 
North Carolina Synod has always firmly stood for general educa- 
tion among the people, and especially for a thoroughly educated 
ministry. 

In 1772, when Organ and St. John's Churches sent commis- 
sioners to Germany in search of a pastor, they were also in- 
structed to secure a school teacher. And when, in 1773, they 
returned, they brought both with them, thus closely identifying 
the work of the church and of the school. And when, thirty 
years later, the North Carolina Synod was organized, she did 
not forget to place the church and the school side by side when- 
ever and wherever practicable, and from that beginning down 
to the present her pastors have often officiated in both capacities. 

The early records bear witness to the Synod's deep interest in 
the educational work, and her realization of the need of better 
facilities for the promotion of the work, by her constant inquiries 
of and plans for the establishment of schools, as well as by her 
many and large appropriations for their support. 

The Tennessee School. 

As early as 181 6, two members of the Synod, Philip Henkel 
and Joseph E. Bell, established a school in Green County, Tenn., 
in which Hebrew, Greek, Latin, German, and English were 
taught. This was a private enterprise, but, in 181 7, it was 
adopted as the school of the Synod, and an appropriation of 
money made to help support it. 

The beginning was auspicious, and but for the schism in the 

(64) 



THE EDUCATIONAL WORK OF THE SYNOD. 65 

Synod, that began at the next convention, in 1S19, the institu- 
tion might have been a grand success. Unfortunately for the 
undertaking, however, Mr. Bell, shortly after the rupture, sev- 
ered his relations with the Lutheran Church, and Mr. Henkel 
became so embittered and antagonistic toward the North Caro- 
lina Synod that she declined to have anything more to do with 
it, and the school soon dwindled away and finally died. 

In 1820, following close on her withdrawal from an interest in 
the Tennessee school, an effort was made to induce the Synod to 
unite with other denominations in the establishment of a uni- 
versity. But, notwithstanding her deep interest in the question 
of education and earnest desires for better facilities, she respect- 
fully but firmly declined such an enterprise, knowing that such 
were usually but -theological battle-grounds, and seldom accom- 
plished much else. 

Theological Seminary. 

The Theological Seminary of the General Synod at Gettys- 
burg, Pa., was established in 1826. In that enterprise the North 
Carolina Synod took a deep interest and an active part, furnish- 
ing both men and means, and has sent many of her young men 
there as students, the first of which were the Revs. S. W. Harkey, 
D. D., Theophilus Stork, D. D., and S. Rothrock, D. D. 

In 1830 the South Carolina Synod established a literary school 
and theological seminary. The institution opened with flatter- 
ing prospects and was conducted exclusively by the South Caro- 
lina Synod, with good success, until 1836. In that year a dele- 
gation from the South Carolina Synod, consisting of Rev. E. L. 
Hazelius, D. D., and Mr. Henry Muller, presented themselves 
on the floor of the North Carolina Synod for the purpose of con- 
sulting as to the possibility of uniting the two Synods in the 
support, management, and benefits of the seminary, then located 
at Lexington, S. C. 

They were cordially received and invited to " a seat, and vote, 
and participation in all the transactions of the Synod, ' ' and, at 
the proper time, presented the following propositions : 

" 1. The Synod of South Carolina will allow that of North 
Carolina such share in the government of the institution estab- 



66 HISTORY OF NORTH CAROLINA SYNOD. 

lished at Lexington as their portion of the funds shall equitably 
entitle them to. ' ' 

"2. The students from North Carolina that enter the semi- 
nary shall be entitled to free tuition, as well as the students from 
South Carolina." 

"3. The fund collected by our brethren of North Carolina 
shall remain under the control of the Synod of North Carolina, 
and only its yearly proceeds made over to the Treasurer of our 
seminary." 

The Synod listened to these propositions with deep interest, 
unanimously accepted them, and voted : " That each minister of 
this Synod be constituted an agent to solicit and raise all the 
contributions he can, at home and abroad, for the support of the 
seminary," and elected the President, Rev. William Artz and 
Colonel John Smith, as Principals, with Rev. H. Graeber and 
Mr. Moses L. Brown as Alternates, ' ' to meet the Synod of 
South Carolina at its next meeting;" instructing them to 
"strictly adhere to the propositions made," and "make no 
agreement to raise a larger sum of money" than should be re- 
ported to them by the different pastors by the first day of the 
following October. 

In 1837 Rev. Artz reported that he had attended the meeting 
of the South Carolina Synod, and that the following had been 
agreed upon: "That no business of any kind connected with 
the interests of the seminary shall be transacted by the Board of 
Directors, or by any portion of the Board, until the Directors 
residing in North Carolina shall have been advised of the nature 
of such business, and their opinions obtained in writing ; and, 
also, that no important change shall be made in the statutes and 
government of the seminary, even should the Directors in North 
Carolina agree to such alterations, until the sense of the Synod 
in that State shall be known ; and, finally, that the right be con- 
ceded to the two Synods respectively to rescind this agreement 
and annul the obligations growing out of the same, whenever, in 
the opinion of either body, such a dissolution is advisable." 

To these conditions the North Carolina Synod gave its hearty 
approval, and made it obligatory upon all students under its care 




REV. S. ROTHROCK, D. D. 



THE EDUCATIONAL WORK OF THE SYNOD. 67 

to prosecute their studies at this seminary, and reported $530.70 
for the seminary fund. 

The co-operation of the two Synods in the support of this 
seminary, thus so happily begun, continued uninterruptedly, 
and with entire satisfaction, until 1855, when the North Caro- 
lina Synod, having established an institution of its own and 
upon its own territory, withdrew from the compact and trans- 
ferred its fund, then amounting to $1040.05, to its own institu- 
tion. During the nineteen years of co-operation, the Synod 
had paid between $1200.00 and $2000.00 interest into the semi- 
nary treasury, and had sent many of her young men as students. 
The fund had been considerably larger than the above amount, 
but had been lessened, in 1842, by the withdrawal of the con- 
tributions of those congregations that united to form the South- 
west Virginia Synod. 

For years it had been the desire of the Synod to have a liter- 
ary institution of its own upon its own territory, but nothing 
tangible was accomplished until July 21st, 1852, when the 
Synod met in extra session at Concord, N. C, for the express 
purpose of maturing a plan for the establishment of such an 
institution. At that convention it was decided to establish an 
institution to be known as 

The Western Carolina Male Academy. 

A plan for the same was adopted, and a temporary Board of 
Directors was appointed. This board met at Organ Church, 
December 2d, 1852, and, after a long consideration of the prop- 
ositions laid before it, decided to locate the academy at Mount 
Pleasant, N. C. 

At the next regular convention of Synod, held in Newton, 
April, 1853, the above actions were all approved and ratified,, 
and a permanent Board of Directors elected as follows : Revs.. 
S. Rothrock, J. D. Sheck, J. A. Linn, W. G. Harter, S. Scherer,, 
and L. C. Groseclose, and Messrs. C. Melchor, M. Barrier, J. 
Shimpoch, C. A. Heilig, D. Barrier, and C. L. Partee. 

A Committee of Correspondence was appointed consisting of 
Revs. S. Rothrock, J. D. Sheck, and J. A. Linn, who were to 



68 HISTORY OF NORTH CAROLINA SYNOD. 

endea\ r or to find a suitable man to take charge of the academy ; 
and that there might be no unnecessary delays, the President 
was authorized to call a special meeting of Synod, if needed. 
On the question of ways and means for the new institution the 
Synod adopted the following : 

"Whereas, This Synod is now in possession of a fund, en- 
titled the "Centenary Fund," the interest of which has hereto- 
fore been applied to the use and benefit of the Education and 
Missionary Society ; therefore, ' ' 

" Resolved, That the interest now due on said fund be added 
to the principal ; that to this principal and interest be added a 
sufficient sum to swell the whole amount to $600.00, and that 
said $600.00 be and is hereby transferred to the endowment 
funds of Western Carolina Academy, located at Mount Pleasant, 
N. C." 

At the convention held in 1854 the President of the Board 
of Directors reported that the board had purchased 16^ acres 
of land at $5.00 per acre, and had contracted for the erection 
of a suitable building at a cost of $7000.00, to be completed by 
the first day of January, 1855 ; that the cash and subscriptions 
then in hand amounted to $6000.00, and that in consequence 
there was a deficit of something over $1000.00 ; and that appli- 
cation had been made to the State authorities for a charter for 
the institution. The Synod approved all the actions of the 
board, and, with a view to supplying the deficiency in funds, 
adopted the following : 

'■'■Resolved, That we most earnestly recommend that each 
minister of this Synod, by the earliest possible convenience, call 
on his congregations for subscriptions and donations for Western 
Carolina Male Academy, and that said ministers report the result 
of their efforts to the Board of Directors by the first day of Sep- 
tember next." 

Upon the report of the Committee of Correspondence the 
Synod unanimously elected Rev. William Gerhardt of Northamp- 
ton County, Pa., as the Principal and professor, and instructed 
the President to inform him at once. 

Rev. Gerhardt accepted the call and entered upon his work 



THE EDUCATIONAL WORK OF THE SYNOD. 69 

March ist, 1855. And to the Synod, that year, the President 
of the Board of Directors reported that the erection of the main 
building was progressing, the corner-stone having been laid July 
4th, 1854; that they had contracted for the erection of a pro- 
fessor's house to cost $1425.00 ; that the sum of $3858.00 had 
already been paid out ; that in cash and good subscriptions there 
was then in hand $2278.00 ; and that, consequently, there was 
a debt of $2947.00. 

In view of these facts the Synod took the following action : 

"Resolved, That the agreement entered into with the Synod 
of South Carolina by this Synod in the support of the Theo- 
logical Seminary at Lexington, S. C. , by the payment of the 
yearly interest of the funded capital for education, be and is 
hereby dissolved ; that said fund be transferred to the Board 
of Directors of Western Carolina Male Academy, to be under 
the control and direction of the same for its use and benefit ; and, 
lastly, that said fund, without its proceeds, be subject to an 
order of withdrawal by this Synod at any time. ' ' 

This fund then amounted to $1040.05. 

In 1856 the President of the board reported that the academy 
was in successful operation ; that an assistant professor had been 
employed ; that ample provisions were being made for the accom- 
modation of students; that an agent to collect funds for the in- 
stitution had been employed; that $500.00 had been collected; 
that the entire cost thus far was about $10,000.00; and that 
there was a debt of about $3000.00 to meet, which the board 
had employed two agents to solicit donations for the benefit 
of the institution. 

In 1858 the board reported the indebtedness gradually grow- 
ing less, and suggested the question of " having the charter so 
amended as to immediately change the academy into a college." 

In response to this the Synod took the following action : 

"Whereas, We are fully persuaded that a crisis in our insti- 
tution has arrived when a change is absolutely necessary for its 
future prosperity; therefore," 

"Resolved, That the Board of Directors of Western Caro- 
lina Male Academy be and are hereby instructed to have the 



70 HISTORY OF NORTH CAROLINA SYNOD. 

charter of our institution amended so as to change it from an 
academy into a college, with the power of conferring degrees." 

"Resolved, That this college be named North Carolina Col- 
lege, and subject to the control of the Evangelical Lutheran 
Synod of North Carolina." 

" Resolved, That the Board of Directors are advised, if prac- 
ticable, to elect a President of North Carolina College at its 
next meeting, the 20th inst., and that he act as agent to collect 
funds for it until his services are required in the institution." 

The question of the removal of the academy from Mount 
Pleasant to Concord having arisen, an extra session of Syond 
was held at Lutheran Chapel, August, 1858, to consider the 
matter. As preparatory to the consideration the following was 
adopted : 

"Whereas, This Synod, at its regular annual meeting in 
May last, instructed the Board of Directors of Western Carolina 
Male Academy to have the charter of said institution so amended 
as to change it from an academy into a college, with the power 
of conferring degrees ; and, ' ' 

"Whereas, Said academy is located at Mount Pleasant, 
Cabarrus County ; therefore, ' ' 

" Resolved, That the college to be created out of the academy 
aforesaid cannot, in good faith, be located at any other place 
than the present locality of said academy, unless it can be shown 
by clear and satisfactory reasons that the present location of 
said academy would be unsuitable for the contemplated college : 
and unless it can be further shown that some other location 
would tend to the greater prosperity of said contemplated col- 
lege. ' ' 

" Resolved, That an opportunity be now offered to the friends 
of Concord for them to show why the college should not be 
located at Mount Pleasant ; and that Concord offers superior 
advantages for the location of the college at that place." 

After a long discussion, covering the sessions of Friday, Satur- 
day, Monday, and Tuesday morning, the following was adopted 
by a majority of three : 

" Resolved, That this Synod has heard with attention the 
statements of the advocates of the location of our contemplated 
college at Concord, but, in view of all the facts in the case, this 



THE EDUCATIONAL WORK OF THE SYNOD. 7 1 

Synod still believes that the prosperity of the institution de- 
mands that it remain at Mount Pleasant." 

In view of the contemplated transition, the Synod 

" Resolved, That, from and after the attainment of a college 
charter, the present Board of Directors of Western Carolina 
Male Academy be and are hereby constituted the Board of 
College until the next meeting of our Synod." 

"Resolved, That the President-elect of our institution, so soon 
as he shall have accepted the appointment, be constituted by this 
Synod ex officio a member of the Board." 

The State Legislature, session of 1858-59, amended the charter, 
and the institution became known as 

North Carolina College. 

In i860 two additional buildings were erected and other im- 
provements made at a cost of $8000.00, bringing the entire cost 
of the institution up to $20,000.00. 

At the outbreak of the war in 1861 the college had an invested 
endowment fund of $20,000.00, four professors, and one hundred 
students, and bid fair to become still more prosperous. But 
many of the students entered the Confederate army, the profes- 
sors resigned, and the institution was closed. 

After the close of the war the college was re-opened and the 
good work resumed, and in 1869 the Board reported the college 
out of debt, with $10,000.00 of the endowment fund lost by the 
war and the remaining $10,000.00 invested in State bonds, which 
were under par and affording no income. With varied success, 
the work of the college continued until 1879, when the old 
State bonds were sold, at a sacrifice, and the proceeds applied to 
the accumulated debt, which then amounted to $4000.00. 

An extra session of Synod was called, and met at Mount Pleas- 
ant, December 10th, 1885, to consider the question of and devise a 
plan for again endowing the college. After long and careful consid- 
eration it was decided to raise an endowment fund of $15,000.00, 
and Rev. W. Kimball was appointed agent, who in 1888 reported 
the whole amount raised. During the years that have followed 



72 HISTORY OF NORTH CAROLINA SYNOD. 

much and lasting good has been accomplished by the college. 
Thousands of young men have attended her sessions, sixty have 
graduated, and in the different walks and departments of life the 
good influence of it has been felt. 

And during all these years the Synod has done nobly for her 
institution, giving from first to last more than $50,000.00 for its 
establishment and support. 

Mont Amoena Female Seminary. 

While the Synod was thus actively and successfully engaged 
in the work of educating its young men, it was not forgetful of 
its duty to its young women; and accordingly, in 1858, when 
it was found impracticable to move its male school to Concord, 
it adopted the following : 

' ' Resolved, That . . . we as a Synod pledge ourselves 
to co-operate with Concord in the establishment of a female 
college at that place, and that we await their proposals, to be 
tendered at our next meeting of Synod, for consideration." 

No proposals were made, and in consequence nothing came 
of the resolution except that it brought the subject of female 
education more prominently before the people, and fostered the 
growing interest in such a work ; for, early in the spring of 
1859, an institution was organized at Mount Pleasant, N. C, 
under the name of Mont Amoena Female Seminary, with Mrs. 
Dr. Bittle, Principal, and Mr. Paul Miller, President of its 
Board of Directors. 

This was a purely private enterprise, entered into without any 
consultation with, or help from, the Synod. 

In the following year, i860, the Committee on Education in 
its report to Synod said : " Your committee is pleased to find 
a general interest manifested in the Church upon the subject of 
female education ; and it is hoped that the Church will make 
such provision as to meet this growing demand. We would 
recommend to this body the propriety of taking the initiatory 
steps for the establishment of a female institution." 

Upon this recommendation the Synod appointed a special 
committee, consisting of Revs. L. C. Groseclose, D. I. Dreher, 



THE EDUCATIONAL WORK OF THE SYNOD. 73 

and A. Phillippi, " To report at the next meeting of our Synod 
a plan for the successful establishment of a female institution 
within the bounds of our Synod." 

Before the next meeting of Synod the war between the States 
begun, and under its baneful influences nothing more was done 
toward establishing the school. Mont Araoena Seminary, how- 
ever, continued to be conducted as a private enterprise, and in 
1868, Rev. G. D. Bernheim, D. D., who had become owner 
of the property of the school, proposed to make the seminary 
an institution of the Church, offering it to the Synod for the 
sum of $2000.00, and proposing to become the Synod's agent 
for the procurement of funds, by voluntary contributions, to 
purchase the property. 

In response to this generous offer, the Synod appointed Revs. 
S. Scherer, L. C. Groseclose, and Capt. J. A. Fisher as a special 
committee to confer with Dr. Bernheim, and report the result. 

At the same session the committee reported as follows : 

" Whereas, In the judgment of your committee it is highly 
important to the prosperity of our Church that this Synod have 
under its supervision and control a first-class female seminary ; 
and," 

"Whereas, Rev. G. D. Bernheim of this Synod has pro- 
posed to make a transfer to this Synod of Mount Pleasant Female 
Seminary on the following conditions :" 

" 1. That a full title be made as soon as $2000.00 shall have 
been raised, this being the amount of indebtedness on the insti- 
tution, said Bernheim agreeing to pay interest and taxes on the 
property as long as he holds it in possession." 

"2. That a bond for title be made at the earliest conveni- 
ence." 

" 3. That Rev. G. D. Bernheim agrees to act as agent of 
Synod, to collect funds to liquidate this debt, under the instruc- 
tion of the Board of Trustees to be appointed by Synod." 

" 4. That all the personal property donated by virtue of Rev. 
Bernheim's last year's voluntary agency to the North be here- 
with transferred ; and that he be required to furnish to the Board 
at its first meeting a schedule of said property." 

"5. That this Synod shall not be held responsible for any 
pecuniary liabilities in this transaction." 

" 6. That if the amount to be collected ($2000.00) is not 



74 HISTORY OF NORTH CAROLINA SYNOD. 

raised by G. D. Bernheim, all moneys collected by him for 
this specified object, before or after this present meeting of 
Synod, be paid into the treasury of the Synod, to be applied to 
the erection of a female seminary. ' ' 

" i. Resolved, That this Synod cheerfully accept the aforesaid 
proposition with the conditions annexed." 

"2. Resolved, That it forthwith elect a Board of Trustees for 
the seminary, consisting at present of six members." 

"3. Resolved, That the Board of Trustees meet in the semi- 
nary, and organize as soon as practicable for the transaction of 
business." 

The report of the committee was adopted, and the Board of 
Trustees elected for one year as follows : Revs. L. A. Bikle 
and L. C. Groseclose, Dr. J. L. Henderson, Capt. J. A. Fisher, 
Messrs. J. J. Misenheimer, Alexander Foil, and L. G. Heilig. 

In 1869, Dr. Bernheim reported the completion of his work 
as agent, having secured enough to pay the debt and all necessary 
expenses, and the title to the property was conveyed to the 
Synod. Since then numerous additions and improvements have 
been made to the property, and from first to last the Synod has 
appropriated something over $5000.00 for the institution. The 
institution is and always has been self-sustaining, and has gradu- 
ated sixty-seven young ladies. 

Beneficiary Education. 

The Synod has always believed in and practiced what is known 
as beneficiary education, or, in other words, rendering pecuniary 
assistance to worthy but indigent young men in their prepara- 
tion for the work of the Gospel ministry. 

The early records, as to this work, are not at all as full as we 
could wish, but beginning with D. Moser, in 181 1, Synod has 
assisted hundreds of young men, and has expended for this work, 
on a conservative estimate, not less than $10,000.00. 



CHAPTER X. 

THE CATECHETICAL AND SUNDAY SCHOOL WORK OF THE SYNOD. 

From the time when Nussman and Arends first came to North 
Carolina, up to the organization of the Synod, that is, for a 
period of thirty years, the few Lutheran Churches then in exist- 
ence in North Carolina had been served almost entirely by men 
who had been educated in Germany, where the only recognized 
way of becoming an active member of the Church was through 
a thorough course of catechisation, followed by confirmation. 

Thoroughly indoctrinated themselves, as well as firmly be 
lieving in the Scripturalness and wisdom of this method, they 
insisted that all who should become confirmed members of the 
Church under their administration must first be thoroughly 
taught at least Luther's Smaller Catechism ; and when, in 1803, 
the Synod was organized, it planted itself firmly and squarely 
upon the sound Lutheran practice of catechisation. From that 
position the Synod has never departed. True there may have 
been individuals and congregations that have, at different times, 
belonged to the Synod, that discarded or disregarded the good 
old custom, preferring some "new measures," but the Synod 
itself has always held the one position, recognizing the catechet- 
ical class as the most Scriptural means under God of preserving 
and perpetuating the purity, peace, unity, and strength of the 
Church as a whole, as well as the stability and faithfulness of her 
members. And the wisdom of the position is seen throughout 
.all the history of the Synod ; for its brightest spiritual lights, 
both in pulpit and pew, have been those who have come to con- 
firmation through this God-given and time-honored practice of 
catechisation. 

Long before the organization of the Synod the Rev. Nussman 
appealed to the Helmstaedt Mission Society for suitable books for 
■the benefit of his people, especially for a suitable Catechism. 

(75) 



76 HISTORY OF NORTH CAROLINA SYNOD. 

His efforts were crowned with success, for a new and special edi- 
tion of the " Helmstaedt Catechism " was published under the 
title of the "North Carolina Catechism," and sent over to 
Nussman. This book was used for years, and was held in high 
esteem both here and in Germany. 

At the very First Annual Convention, in 1803, Philip Henkel 
came before the Synod as a licensed catechist, and from that day 
on until the license system was finally abolished, in 1869, the 
Synod always had men, in addition to the fully ordained pastors, 
whose special duty it was to catechise the youths and children in 
preparation for confirmation ; and, that none might be neglected, 
at different times appropriated money with which to purchase 
Catechisms for the use of those who were financially unable to 
supply themselves. 

In 1806, possibly because some one or more may have slighted 
or neglected the practice, the Synod adopted the following : 

"Resolved, That no pastor in our connection shall confirm 
children, except in cases of absolute necessity, without a six 
weeks' preparation." 

It is difficult for us of the present day to realize how rapidly 
and how extensively this part of their work grew and increased 
upon their hands. Not only from the field in North Carolina, 
but from several other States, the cry was constantly coming ask- 
ing that their children might be properly instructed and con- 
firmed in the Church of their fathers. In 18 13 word was brought 
to the Synod of two hundred and forty-one persons, in one local- 
ity, who were anxious to be instructed in the Catechism ; and at 
every convention of Synod this subject was before its ministry in 
some way, or in some light, demanding their constant attention. 

At first Catechisms were very scarce and difficult to procure ; 
but as time advanced they were rapidly produced by different 
persons, both in the German and English languages. 

That none of these were perfect, we can easily understand ; 
and that many of them were imperfect and some very defective, 
we all know; and in consequence, in 181 1, the question arose 
in Synod as to which Catechism should be used as the basis- 



CATECHETICAL AND SUNDAY SCHOOL WORK OF SYNOD. 77 

of instruction ? Whereupon it was unanimously agreed that 
" Luther's Smaller Catechism must ever be the basis of catechet- 
ical instruction. ' ' But that other Catechisms might be used by 
way of explanation, at the discretion and judgment of the 
pastors. 

As the fruits of this catechetical work of the Synod, reports 
were submitted in 1811 showing that up to that time more than 
two thousand young people had been confirmed in the churches. 

In those days it was customary, when Synod was to meet in a 
certain church at a certain time, for the pastor .to prepare his 
class for the occasion. The Synod would assemble on Sunday ; 
hold divine service, consisting of the preaching of the Word, fol- 
lowed by confirmation and the administration of the Lord's 
Supper. The records show that often between seventy-five and 
one hundred were confirmed upon such occasions. 

All down through the years that have passed since then this 
catechetical work has been going on, and has been blessed of God 
to the ingathering of thousands upon thousands of children and 
youths who have grown up to become the pillars of the Church, 
and whose descendants are to-day the bone and sinew of our dif- 
ferent congregations. 

In this centennial year of the Synod, throughout all its borders 
the catechetical class is the normal way of preparing the young 
for confirmation, and continues to be held as the most Scriptural 
and satisfactory way. 

Next to the history of the Church, both in importance and 
interest, is the history of the Sunday School work. 

Unlike the Church, which is of divine institution, Sunday 
Schools are human expedients devised and adopted for the pur- 
pose of supplementing the work of the Church. 

Originating in Europe in 1550, they were introduced in Amer- 
ica in the latter part of the eighteenth century; but it was not 
until the beginning of the nineteenth century that they became 
anything like general. 

Philadelphia, 1791; New Jersey, 1794; New York, 1804; 
New Hampshire, 1805; Massachusetts, 1810; Connecticut, 
181 5 ; and Ohio, 181 6, are some of the historic dates of the be- 



78 HISTORY OF NORTH CAROLINA SYNOD. 

ginnings of Sunday Schools. In 1807 G. Shober, then a lay- 
man in the Moravian Church, and Martin Rippel, a layman of 
the Lutheran Church, organized a Sunday School five miles from 
Salem, N. C, on the road leading from Salem to Lexington. 
This was the first Sunday School ever organized in the State of 
North Carolina, and resulted in the organization of Hopewell 
Evangelical Lutheran Church, which united with the North Car- 
olina Synod in 1 8 1 2 . By mutual agreement the house was built 
by Mr. Rippel, and the school and congregation were served by 
Mr. Shober, who, in 18 10, was ordained by the North Carolina 
Synod. Hence the Synod has the honor of having had the first 
Sunday School in the State. The school has been in continuous 
existence from that date to this, a period of ninety-six years. 

The Synod at once recognized the great good that might be 
accomplished in this line of work, sanctioned and endorsed it, 
and wisely adopted it in her system. 

In 18 16 it " Earnestly recommended that all its ministers es- 
tablish Sunday Schools in all our churches," stipulating that they 
should be "under the supervision of the pastor, and should be 
opened and closed with singing and prayer. ' ' * 

The following year five schools were reported as established, 
four in Guilford and one in Stokes County, From that day to 
this the Synod has always approved of and encouraged the Sun- 
day School work when kept within its legitimate bounds. 

* German Minutes, 1816, page 4. 



CHAPTER XI. 

MISCELLANEOUS MATTERS OF INTEREST. 

Liturgy. 

At the very beginning of the life of the Synod, and for many 
long years before, the Lutheran congregations in North Carolina 
were theoretically liturgical, though, so far as known, this theory 
was not often put into actual practice. 

St. John's Church of Cabarrus County, as early as 1782, 
adopted the Order of Service used in the German Lutheran Court 
Chapel of St. James, in London, England, and it is presumed 
used it ; but for how long and to what extent the congregation 
participated, we have no means of knowing. 

In the early days of the Synod, the question of an li Agende" 
or liturgy was constantly before the ministers, pressing upon 
them and demanding a solution. Frequent correspondence 
was had with the brethren of the Ministerium of Pennsylvania, 
who were at that time preparing to publish such a work ; but 
after waiting, in vain, until 1817, the Synod then recommended 
for use in the churches the "English Liturgy" of the New 
York Synod and the English Hymn Book, published by Rev. 
Paul Henkel, together with the "Gemeinschaftliche Gesang- 
buch," Union Hymn Book, published by Schaeffer and Maund. 

Whether or not the congregations, in the regular services, ever 
gave the responses, the records do not show ; but, taking into 
consideration the scarcity of books and the difficulty of obtain- 
ing them, the isolation of the congregations, the lack of educa- 
tion, and the influences of those around them, who were out- 
spoken in their objections to all liturgical worship, it is doubtful 
if the congregations ever gave the responses until the introduction 
of the Book of Worship of the Southern General Synod. With its 
introduction began a healthy revival and growth of liturgical wor- 
ship, which has gradually advanced until to-day there are but few 

(79) 



So HISTORY OF NORTH CAROLINA SYNOD. 

congregations in the Synod that are satisfied with anything less 
than the full morning service of our present Book of Worship. It 
is still true that neither all of our congregations nor all of our 
members unite in the service, but it is growing, and as time ad- 
vances will become more and more generally used. 

Confession and Absolution. 
The Lutheran custom of holding special preparatory services 
on a day previous to the time fixed for the administration of the 
Lord's Supper generally has been and is to-day the rule of the 
Synod. 

Government. 

In government the Synod has always been congregational. 
In its first Constitution, Article II., the declaration is made 
that "The members of Synod are, first, ministers, and, second, 
one lay delegate from each congregation, on presentation of a 
certificate of his election as delegate from the congregation he 
represents. ' ' 

In practice the Synod has always carefully refrained from 
legislating in matters that rightfully belong to the congregation, 
confining itself to those things delegated to it by the congrega- 
tions in their subscription to its Constitution. 

Discipline. 
Of its ministers, the Synod has always demanded purity of 
life and conformity to its regulations, and has never hesitated 
to exercise and enforce discipline. 

Temperance and Liquor Traffic. 

On the subject of temperance the Synod has always taken a firm 
stand, not only in enforcing discipline upon those who were in- 
temperate, but also in placing upon record her mature convic- 
tions on the subject. 

In 1855 tne following was adopted as the sentiment of the 
Synod : 

" 1. Resolved, When the immorality of any business is placed 
beyond the possibility of doubt, it is the duty of all Christians 
to frown upon every attempt to license such traffic or crime. ' ' 



MISCELLANEOUS MATTERS OF INTEREST. 8 1 

"2. Resolved, That legal enactments should never conflict 
with moral law; and that the entire traffic in intoxicating 
drinks, except for medicinal and mechanical purposes, should be 
stayed at once and forever by the strong arm of the law. ' ' 

"3. Resolved, That this Synod regards the manufacture of 
and traffic in and use of ardent spirits, as a beverage, inconsist- 
ent with Christian character ; that no member of our churches 
should be indulged in the manufacture, traffic, or intemperate 
use of intoxicating liquors ; and that all our pastors, church 
councils, and members be urgently and most earnestly requested 
to co-operate in suppressing the great evil of drunkenness in our 
country and the world." 

In 1863 the following was adopted : 

"Whereas, The practice of distilling spirituous liquors out 
of fruit has prevailed to an alarming extent among our farmers, 
since the passage of an act by our Legislature prohibiting such 
distillation out of corn and other cereals ; therefore," 

" Resolved, That it is the duty of our ministers to discounte- 
nance this practice by every lawful means at their disposal." 

In 1882 the following expressed the sentiment of Synod : 

" Whereas, The grace of God, conveyed to the heart through 
the divinely appointed means, affords the only power by which 
the grievous sin of intemperance can be effectually overcome ; 
and," 

"Whereas, All efforts in behalf of the overthrow of this 
monstrous evil, ignoring this important fact, will prove abortive, 
therefore ; be it," 

"Resolved, That we, as a religious body, deem proper to ex- 
press our decided disapproval of the manufacture and sale of all 
intoxicating drinks as a beverage, and that we will, by all pru- 
dent and lawful means, discourage and restrain the same." 

Benevolence. 

The men who, in the providence of God, organized the 
Synod, had broad and expansive views and ideas of the work 
that lay before them. They realized that there was an immense 
work to be done, that it could not be carried on without means, 
and that to secure the necessary means a benevolent spirit must 
be cultivated among themselves as well as with all for whom and 
with whom they had come to labor. They realized that benevo- 



82 HISTORY OF NORTH CAROLINA SYNOD. 

lence was not an accident, but a necessity in the Church, and 
that its ultimate aim should be the glory of God and the honor 
of His Son, Jesus Christ, through the devoted and consecrated 
lives and deeds of His faithful followers. 

Accordingly they early began to plant the seed, trusting to 
God for growth and fruit. In the first Constitution, adopted at 
the First Annual Convention, they said (Article VIII.): "Im- 
pelled by Christian sympathy, as well as duty and necessity, our 
Church should contribute with all the means and powers it can 
command toward relieving the necessities and granting the 
reasonable requests of all our congregations in this and also all 
other States." 

From this beginning, down through all the years that have 
followed, the Synod has ever sought to cultivate the spirit of true 
benevolence, and with blessed and immeasurable results, as has 
been shown in the detailed accounts of the different chapters of 
this work. 

Church Extension. 

In 1887 St. Enoch's Church at Enochville, N. C, Rev. W. 
A. Lutz, pastor, in celebrating the fiftieth anniversary of its or- 
ganization, as a thank-offering for blessings and mercies received, 
began a Church Extension Fund by raising $75.00 cash. This 
was proposed to be placed " Under control of the Synod, 
provided Synod approves of the formation of a Church Extension 
Fund, to be used in North Carolina only." 

The Committee on the State of the Church, in making its re- 
port in 1888, recommended that "This Synod now appoint a 
Board of Church Extension " for the purpose " of carrying out 
the wishes of St. Enoch's. ' ' This recommendation was adopted, 
and the following Board was elected, viz. : Revs. W. A. Lutz, 
W. G. Campbell, and Captain T. L. Seigle, Captain J. Cook, 
and W. H. Strauss, Esq. 

At the same convention of Synod the following resolutions 
were adopted : 

" 1. Resolved, That the Board of Church Extension have 
power to frame and adopt a Constitution and By-Laws for its 
government, and be authorized to secure an act of incorporation, 



MISCELLANEOUS MATTERS OF INTEREST. 83 

so as to be known in law and enabled to receive bequests, leg- 
acies, and moneys. ' ' 

"2. Resolved, That the members of said Board shall hold 
office at the pleasure of Synod, and, in case of resignation, 
death, or removal of any member of the Board, the Board shall 
have power to fill the vacancies so caused ad interim.' 1 '' 

" 3. Resolved, That the Board shall render an account to 
Synod annually of all acts performed by it during the year. ' ' 

The Board met in St. James' Church, Concord, N. C, May 
9th, 1888, and organized by electing the following officers: 
President, Rev. W. A. Lutz ; Secretary, Rev. W. G. Campbell ; 
Treasurer, Captain T. L. Seigle. 

The question having arisen as to the terms for lending the 
funds of the Board of Church Extension, the Synod adopted the 
following regulations in 1891 : 

1. No loans shall be made for less than one year or more 
than three years. 

2. Not less than $50.00 and not more than $500.00 shall be 
loaned to any one congregation. 

3. Any amount that is loaned for the term longer than one 
year must be equally divided into notes, each payable at the 
end of the first, second, or third year, as the case may be. 

4. The amount of any note must not be less than $50.00. 

5. In case any note when due cannot be paid promptly, the 
Board has the power to grant the party, or parties, twelve 
months time to settle the same, providing 8 per cent, per annum 
interest is paid on said note. 

6. If the signature of notes is not entirely satisfactory to the 
Board of Church Extension, said Board shall secure a mortgage 
on the property on which the loan is made, or other good secur- 
ity satisfactory to the Board. 

7. These rules are subject to change only by action of the 
North Carolina Synod. 

In 1892, upon recommendation of the Board, the Synod 
adopted the following additional regulations : 

1. Only organized and chartered congregations, and con- 
nected with the North Carolina Synod, or points operated by 
the United Synod in connection with the North Carolina Synod 
of the Lutheran Church, shall obtain loans from this fund, and 
in all cases the Board shall hold conditional bonds and mort- 



84 HISTORY OK NORTH CAROLINA SYNOD. 

gages, so that the congregation must ever remain loyal to the 
North Carolina Synod. 

2. The amount of a loan to a congregation shall not exceed 
the amount raised by the congregation itself, unless in extreme 
cases, of which the Board shall be the judge. 

3. No loan shall be granted to any congregation whose ability 
and willingness to refund said loan at maturity may be ques- 
tioned by the Board. 

4. The Board may require congregations who have loans to 
keep up insurance on their church buildings and transfer the pol- 
icies to the Board as collateral security. 

Under these regulations the work of the Board has worked 
admirably, and has accomplished much good. 



CHAPTER XII. 

THE MISSIONARY OPERATIONS OF THE SYNOD. 

Missionary Journeys. 

Were all the missionary operations of the Synod written in 
full it would reach far beyond the limits of this volume ; would, 
indeed, form quite a volume of itself. Hence we are under the 
necessity of condensing as much as possible. 

The founders of the Synod were all filled with the missionary 
spirit. They recognized the fact that the ultimate aim of the 
Church was the glory of God and the honor of Jesus Christ, His 
Son, in the saving of souls. And it was this supreme motive 
that impelled them to be always ready to meet the responsibility 
of going out of themselves, reaching beyond the limits of their 
own congregations and Synod, that they might carry the blessed 
Word to those less favorably situated. 

Beginning with Nussman and followed by all the rest of them, 
each considered himself under the necessity of doing personal mis- 
sionary work wherever needed and whenever possible, though 
to do so meant hardships and self-denials of the severest kind. 

For years, beginning in 1S10, the Synod annually appointed 
and sent out traveling missionaries, pledging to see that they 
received a sufficient support, and during succeeding years it was 
the unwritten law of the Synod that all fifth Sundays in the 
months, when no conference meetings were held, should be de- 
voted by the pastors to home missionary operations within the 
bounds of the Synod. 

The immediate cause of their undertaking this great work was 
the constant emigration of members of their churches into new 
States and Territories where the means of grace had not yet 
entered. From such places urgent appeals were frequent and 
strong, asking and begging the Synod to send pastors, or at 
least traveling preachers, to preach the Word to them, baptize, 

(35) 



86 HISTORY OF NORTH CAROLINA SYNOD. 

instruct and confirm their children, and to administer to them 
the Holy Sacrament of the Lord's Supper. 

At that time a mere handful of ministers composed the Synod, 
not even enough to supply the pressing needs in their own im- 
mediate territory. There seemed but one thing possible to be 
done, and to a certain extent that was done, namely, to leave, 
for a time, the churches at home, and make extended missionary 
tours or journeys into these destitute regions. From the annual re- 
ports of these traveling preachers {Reiseprediger) , we glean much 
interesting and instructive matter. The first traveling missionary 
appointed by Synod was the Rev. R. J. Miller. His home was 
in Burke County, N. C. On the 18th day of June, 1811, he 
started, by private conveyance, on his first missionary tour. His 
route lay through Wilkes, Surry, and Stokes Counties, N. C, 
into Virginia, by the way of New Market and Lewisburg, 
through Pendleton, Bath, Greenbrier, Monroe, Montgomery, 
Wythe, and Washington Counties, Virginia, into Tennessee, 
through Sullivan, Carter, Washington, and Green Counties, 
and thence through the mountains of Western North Carolina 
back to his home, where he arrived about the middle of Octo- 
ber. Resting but a few days, on the 4th of November, 181 1, 
he again started, this time for a journey southward. Passing 
through Rutherfordton, across Broad and Green Rivers, through 
a thinly settled country, to Spartanburg, S. C, thence by Hard 
Labor Creek, to the Savannah and Saluda Rivers, by way of 
Hollow Creek Church (Salem), to Orangeburg District, and 
thence back home again. 

In his report to Synod he tells of the great spiritual destitu- 
tion and ignorance of the people, the extreme scarcity of true 
ministers of the Gospel, and the pitiful pleading for the Word 
and sacraments, and says, " On my whole tour I have baptized 
this year two adults and sixty children, preached sixty-seven 
times, traveled three thousand miles, and received $70.44 for 
ray support, without asking for a cent in any way." 

In 1S11, Rev. Philip Henkel was chosen as traveling mis- 
sionary, and, in 18 12, reported that everywhere he went there 
was great destitution and a loud call for pastors. 




REV. JACOB SCHEKER. 



THE MISSIONARY OPERATIONS OF THE SYNOD. 87 

In 18 1 2, Rev. J. P. Franklow was requested to visit South 
Carolina to look after scattered members of a once prosperous 
congregation in a section of the country called " Saltketcher. " 
He spent about a month on the journey. His report of the 
condition of the churches and people in those parts is heart- 
rending indeed. Pastor and people at variance, whole commu- 
nities without any spiritual care, and the people like sheep with- 
out a shepherd. 

In 1812, Revs. R. J. Miller and Jacob Schererwere appointed 
as traveling missionaries. Together they traveled to Virginia, as 
far as Pendleton County, where they parted ; Miller going down 
the Shenandoah Valley, as far as Winchester ; and Scherer to 
the State of Ohio, where a great number of families, who had 
emigrated from North Carolina, were living, and for whose 
spiritual welfare the North Carolina Synod was much concerned. 
Here he spent a month in daily preaching, baptizing, and con- 
firming. In July, on his way home again, he passed through 
Powells and Grassy Valleys in Virginia, where he found many 
families from North Carolina, all eager to hear the preaching 
of the Word, and longing and praying that they might have 
regular pastors among them. Summing up, he says that he 
traveled 1617 miles, preached 50 times, baptized 72 children 
and one adult, and in connection with Brother Miller, and partly 
alone, organized thirteen congregations, consisting of 11 75 
members. 

Rev. Paul Henkel made many missionary journeys during the 
time of his connection with the North Carolina Synod, as well 
as before and after that time. He, accompanied by his wife, 
would leave home in their own conveyance, taking provisions, 
cooking vessels, and bedding with them. Wherever night would 
overtake them, they would build their camp-fire, prepare their 
supper, and retire for the night under the canopy of the heavens. 
Thus they traveled through the mountains of Virginia into the 
States of Kentucky and Ohio. He would preach wherever 
opportunity afforded, administering the sacraments wherever 
needed. In this way he would labor, remaining as long as 
necessary, then travel on again to another place of destitution, 



88 HISTORY OF NORTH CAROLINA SYNOD. 

and so on in the most practical way of missionary -work, until 
he would return to his home. Then he would make his report 
to Synod, usually verbal . 

Tempted by the rumors of the richness of the soil and the 
ease with which land could be secured in the new countries west 
of the Allegheny Mountains, many families emigrated from 
North Carolina and settled in what is now the States of Ten- 
nessee, Kentucky, Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, and other States and 
Territories. From these scattered members of the Church a 
constant appeal was coming to the Synod begging for spiritual 
food and nourishment. In response, as best it' could, the Synod 
sent of its pastors to visit them and minister to their spiritual 
necessities. Some of these visiting pastors at length settled per- 
manently among them and founded congregations, many of 
them composed entirely of North Carolinians. True, not all were 
thus well provided for ; the harvest was so extensive and the 
ministers were so few that but a small portion of the field could 
be cultivated, and, in consequence, very many were left without 
the spiritual care of Lutheran pastors, and were eventually lost 
to the Lutheran Church. But these missionary efforts of the 
Synod were the means of saving many, and of thus establishing 
the Lutheran Church, where now, as a result, it is strong in 
numbers, as well as in wealth and influence. 

Accordingly the Rev. L. Markert was appointed traveling 
missionary in 1813, visited those western fields, and in 18 16 
removed to Indiana and settled there. In 18 17, reporting by 
letter to the Synod, he describes the deplorable condition of the 
Church in that section, tells of the many scattered congregations 
that he was then serving, he being the only Lutheran minister 
in the State, and also sets forth the fact that on account of the 
poverty of the people no minister could depend upon the 
churches for his support, but must earn his living in some other 
way ; but still those people were urgently petitioning Synod 
that ministers should be sent to them. 

In this same year (181 7), a petition came from Bedford 
County, Tenn., requesting a visit from some one of the ministers 
of the Synod, and in response the Synod took the following action : 




REV. TAUL HENKEI, AND WIFE. 



THE MISSIONARY OPERATIONS OF THE SYNOD. 89 

"Resolved, That Candidate David Henkel, provided he can 
make the journey, visit that place, and also Cape Girardeau, at 
the Mississippi River, to minister to them the sacraments, gather 
congregations, and report the same at the next meeting of 
Synod." 

Unfortunately, the next meeting of the Synod, in 1819, was 
the beginning of the rupture, and we have no report of his con- 
cerning the trip to that country. 

In 1 8 19 there came to the Synod a heart -affecting memorial 
from members of our Church in Illinois Territory, praying and 
begging for ministers. But, alas ! with that terrible crisis upon 
them, the petition " Could not otherwise be answered than with 
this painful ejaculation : ' Dear Brethren, we gladly would help 
you, but we cannot.' ' The next year, by request of Synod, 
Rev. L. Markert visited them and ministered unto them in 
holy things. 

In 1S24, Rev. Jacob Scherer reported to Synod that, accord- 
ing to previous instructions, he had visited Bedford County, 
Tenn., had traveled 2200 miles, preached 38 times, and had 
received $45.60 ; his expenses being $20.69. 

This same year Rev. William Jenkins reported that he bad 
visited the Lutheran congregations near Duck River, in Tennes- 
see, where he was received with joy and treated with much 
Christian affection. He says, " I preached in the two already 
organized congregations with much pleasure, and organized 
two additional churches in Franklin and Lincoln Counties. In 
this district there is a great and open field for Lutheran 
ministers, and the longing for them is on the increase." He 
tells of a settlement near Jackson, "where many Lutherans 
reside, who would rejoice if they were visited, or were 
served regularly." And he concludes his report thus. "Since 
the last Synod I rode 3000 miles, preached 175 times, baptized 
84 children, 7 adults and 7 negroes, received 34 into the 
church, and buried eight persons. The destitution of Union 
County, 111., was again presented to Synod in 1825, and Rev. 
William Jenkins was appointed to visit there, and do for them 
all that he could. The Secretary of Synod was also instructed 



90 HISTORY OF NORTH CAROLINA SYNOD. 

to write to Rev. Samuel Schmucker, who was one of the founders 
and first professors of the Theological Seminary at Gettysburg, 
Pa., and at that time perhaps the most widely and favorably 
known man in the Lutheran Church in America, to send a 
preacher to that destitute field. In 1827 the Rev. John C. A. 
Schoenberg was sent, and in 1828 he reported to the Synod that 
"On his arrival at St. John's Church, in Union County, 111., 
the congregations were in a desolate condition, like sheep with- 
out a shepherd. Some had suffered themselves to be proselyted 
by sects, and others had almost despaired of obtaining a 
minister of our persuasion. Soon, however, the wavering be- 
came more steadfast, the desponding were enabled to rejoice, 
and the congregations began to flourish. Hundreds of Luther- 
ans are scattered through Illinois, Indiana, and Missouri, en- 
tirely destitute of preaching by our ministers, and in some places 
even congregations imperfectly organized, who seem to extend 
their hands toward us, saying, ' Come over into Macedonia and 
help us.' How painful is it, that we have to turn away from 
such urgent calls with a sorrowful heart, unable to supply them 
with the bread of life. " 

In 1832, the Rev. Daniel Scherer, who for ten years had been 
the pastor of St. John's Church, Cabarrus County, N. C, felt it 
his duty to labor as a missionary in the State of Illinois. He 
located himself in Hillsboro, and soon had a congregation organ- 
ized and in a flourishing condition. In 1834 the Synod adopted 
the following resolution : 

" Resolved, That we express our approbation of the laudable 
efforts of the Rev. Daniel Scherer in collecting and organizing a 
Lutheran congregation in Hillsboro, 111." 

"Resolved, That we receive the same into full connection 
with this Synod. ' ' 

In 1836, the Rev. Daniel Scherer was dismissed from the 
North Carolina Synod to unite himself with the " Synod of the 
West, ' ' and his congregation of course went with him. 

Much missionary work was done by the Synod in parts of 
Virginia up to 1842, the time when the " Western Virginia 
Synod ' ' was organized. 



THE MISSIONARY OPERATIONS OF THE SYNOD. 9 1 

From then on to the present time the missionary operations of 
the Synod have been confined principally to the State of North 
Carolina, other Synods having been formed around it, North, 
South, and West. Many congregations have been organized and 
much missionary work has been done. To-day the missionary 
labors of the Synod are devoted mostly to the establishment of 
new congregations, which are increasing so rapidly that it re- 
quires all the energy and benevolence that the Synod can com- 
mand to attend to these new fields. 

The following are some of the congregations that have been 
organized and assisted to a greater or less extent by the Synod : 

St. Paul's Church, Wilmington ; St. Mark's Church, Char- 
lotte ; St. James' Church, Concord ; St. John's Church, Salis- 
bury ; St. Matthew's Church, Wilmington ; Augsburg Church, 
Winston ; Macedonia Church, Burlington ; St. Andrew's 
Church, Concord, and many others. 

Missionary Operations During the War. 

During the war between the States (1861-65), the Synod was 
actively engaged in missionary work among the soldiers in the 
camps and hospitals and on the fields of battle, sending and sup- 
porting chaplains to minister to them in spiritual things. No 
careful record was kept of the work, but from what we have it is 
evident that much good was accomplished and many souls com- 
forted in the hours of suffering and death. The Synod at one 
time appropriated $5000.00 to this work. 

Among the Colored People. 

In t88o the Synod inaugurated missionary work among the 
colored people. For this purpose D. J. Koontz, a most excel- 
lent colored man, who had been instructed in both his literary 
and theological course by members of the Synod, was examined 
by the Ministerium, found qualified, and ordained by the Synod. 
A lot was secured at Pleasant Grove, money contributed for the 
erection of a house of worship, and the work progressed until 
1885, when Samuel Holt and N. Clapp were ordained. These 
reported, in 1889, four congregations under their pastoral care. 



92 HISTORY OF NORTH CAROLINA SYNOD. 

In this year W. P. Phifer appeared before Synod as a candi- 
date for the Lutheran ministry, and, after examination, was 
ordained by a special committee in 1890. 

These four colored ministers, together with lay representatives 
from their congregations, at the convention of Synod in 1889, 
asked to be formed into a separate Synod of their own. A 
special committee, consisting of Revs. W. G. Campbell, F. W. 

E. Peschau, George H. Cox, and T. S. Brown, was appointed, 
who reported to Synod as follows : 

"We your committee, appointed to organize the Colored 
Evangelical Lutheran Synod, met in the council room of St. 
John's Evangelical Lutheran congregation, Cabarrus County, 
N. C, on Wednesday, May 8th, 1889, at 11.30 a. m. Rev. W. 
G. Campbell, the chairman, called the committee to order. Rev. 
George H. Cox was elected as Secretary. After prayer by Rev. 

F. W. E. Peschau, the colored brethren were organized and con- 
stituted under the name and title of ' The Alpha Synod of the 
Evangelical Lutheran Church of Freedmen in America.' 

"The Constitution of the North Carolina Synod was then 
adopted as the Constitution of this Synod. Rev. D. J. Koontz 
was then elected President, W. P. Phifer, Recording and Cor- 
responding Secretary, and Rev. S. Holt, Treasurer." 

Upon the adoption of this report, the members of the new 
Synod offered the following, which was unanimously adopted : 

" Resolved, That we, the members of the Alpha Synod, hereby 
tender our most hearty and sincere thanks to the officers and 
members of the honorable Synod of North Carolina for the kind 
interest they have ever manifested to us, the first Colored Luth- 
erans of North Carolina, and we pray that they may ever cherish 
toward us the same kindly feelings, and help us in our work. 
God bless you for it ! " 

li Resolved, That we hereby unanimously request the Evan- 
gelical Lutheran Synod of North Carolina, that has ever been 
our friend, to be kind enough to print the minutes of our First 
Convention, as an appendix to theirs." 

Which request was granted.* In after years the Colored Luth- 
eran pastors and churches voluntarily united with the Missouri 

" :; " See Minutes, 18S9, page 57. 



THE MISSIONARY OPERATIONS OF THE SYNOD. 93 

Synod, which was conducting extensive missionary operations 
among the colored people of the South. 

The Woman' 's Home and Foreign Missionary Societies. 

In 1885 the missionary work of the women of the Synod was 
inaugurated by the appointment of an Executive Committee to 
plan and prepare for a permanent organization. 

The First Convention was held in St. James' Church, Con- 
cord, N. C, in 1886, at which were represented fourteen Auxili- 
ary Societies, numbering 320 members, and " The Woman's 
Home and Foreign Missionary Society of the North Carolina 
Synod" was organized by the election of Mrs. J. S. Fisher, 
President ; Mrs. J. S. Heilig, Mrs. J. B. Davis, Mrs. J. D. 
Shirey, Mrs. R. A. Brown, and Mrs. A. M. Brown, as Vice-Presi- 
dents ; Miss Julia Shirey, Corresponding Secretary ; Miss Lillian 
Slough, Recording Secretary ; Mrs. John A. Cline, Treasurer. 

This Society has now been in active existence for sixteen 
years. It has thirty Auxiliary Societies, with 944 active, hon- 
orary, and life members, and has contributed $11,674.18 to the 
work of Home and Foreign Missions, besides creating, fostering, 
and encouraging a deeper interest in the general work of the 
Church than had before existed. 



CHAPTER XIII. 

RETROSPECTIVE AND PROSPECTIVE. 

In this good year of our Lord, 1903, we are celebrating with 
joyful and grateful hearts the one hundredth anniversary of the 
organization of our Synod. 

Its beginning at Salisbury, N. C, May 2d, 1803, was small 
indeed and seemingly insignificant. Its infancy was a period 
of fear and hope. Its first history seemed to promise and de- 
velop but little. But from 1803 to 1903 God has never forsaken 
it ; He has always been present with it, and has been constantly 
pouring out His blessings upon it. One hundred and eighty-two 
ministers have belonged to the Synod. Many of the able, effi- 
cient, and godly men of the Lutheran Church have been con- 
nected with it during these one hundred years ; many of them 
have gone on before us into the land of eternal day, and are 
reaping the reward of the faithful servants of their Lord. Many 
are earnestly and faithfully serving the Church under other Syn- 
odical relations ; whilst on the roll of the Synod there are to-day 
more ministers, more churches, and more members than have 
ever been before at any one time during its existence. 

Looking back through the history of the Synod there may 
have been, doubtless are, records of words and actions that we 
may have felt disposed to criticise ; some things, perhaps, that 
we may have wished had not occurred ; and others that to us 
may have seemed strange that when begun were not carried for- 
ward to completion. And yet, when the history is read and 
studied in the light of the past ; when we consider the environ- 
ments of these early fathers, their difficulties, the obstacles that 
were in their way and which they were compelled to overcome, 
and all of the many things which entered into the questions of 
the lives and doings of those whose faithfulness has made the 
Synod what it is ; when we remember those who, in the love 

(94) 



RETROSPECTIVE AND PROSPECTIVE. 95 

and fear of God, piloted the Synod safely through the trying 
times of the war between the States ; and back of them, those 
who endured the hardships of the Revolutionary War and its after 
results ; and still back of them, the men and women who 
labored and prayed patiently but steadily onward, building up 
the Church and the Synod through storm and sunshine, and 
amidst adversity as well as prosperity ; surely, as the memory 
of those years and labors, together with their unnumbered bless- 
ings, come crowding upon us, we can see the hand of God in all 
of it — His hand of blessing, His guiding hand, His uplifting, 
His protecting, His preserving hand — and our hearts cannot fail 
to go out to Him in thanksgiving for all His mercies and bless- 
ings. 

On all the great and important questions that have come before 
the Church in the development of its life here, in its new home 
in America, the Synod has ever uttered a certain sound and 
exerted an important and often a controlling influence. 

The great vital doctrines of the Gospel of the Son of God, the 
work of Home and Foreign Missions, Benevolence, Charity, 
Education, and such questions, coupled with the duty and obli- 
gations of leading godly lives, have ever been presented by the 
Synod in the light and purity of God's Word. 

And the people to whom and for whom the Synod has minis- 
tered have ever responded nobly, grandly, and with hearty good- 
will, contributing freely of their means as God has prospered 
them to all the work of the. Synod. But the grand object of the 
Church upon earth is not only to teach doctrine, liberality, and 
charity ; not merely to civilize and reform, but to bring men 
and women into vital contact with the atoning blood of Jesus, to 
bring them into the arms of His salvation. It does not matter 
how grandly the Synod may have succeeded in everything else, 
all would be complete failure without this having been accom- 
plished. 

In the light of her history, who can say that the Synod has not 
been a success in this, as well as in the other ? The record is 
written in the souls saved through its ministrations who to-day, 
here and elsewhere, are praising and serving God, and in the 



96 HISTORY OF NORTH CAROLINA SYNOD. 

songs of the happy redeemed ones around the throne of God in 
heaven, who have gone up from around the altars of the 
churches of the North Carolina Synod. 

Thousands upon thousands have been added to the Church, 
thousands upon thousands more have heard the Word preached 
from its pulpits. Who can compute the results ? It can never be 
fully known until that day in which the secrets of all hearts shall 
be revealed. But these grand results have come not because of 
any peculiar gifts, merits, or worthiness in, of, or by those who 
have constituted the Synod from time to time, but only because 
of God's gracious mercy and love toward the Synod, and His 
ever-watchful care over, around, and about it, leading it into the 
right paths, and giving its ministry and members grace and 
strength to walk in those paths. 

And now, standing at the one hundredth mile-post, and shading 
our eyes as we attempt to look through the mists out into the un- 
known future, cannot we go forward in perfect confidence and 
ttust in Him who has thus far led us onward ? Who can for a 
moment question but that God will do still greater things in the 
future, through the instrumentality of this Synod, if we only 
press on in full faith in the promised presence of our Lord, 
from whom all blessings come ? With her present facilities 
and advantages ; her own literary institutions, both male and 
female ; her Church Extension, her Home Missionary operations 
on her own territory, and also through co-operation with the 
United Synod of the South in its general work of Home and 
Foreign Missions ; and the prospect and promise of a homoge- 
neous ministry, educated in her own theological seminary of the 
South, and the fast oncoming of the tide of immigration into her 
territory, who can estimate what she may yet, under the bless- 
ing of God, accomplish for His kingdom and glory ? Never has 
the world needed the Gospel more than it does to-day. Never 
have there been grander opportunities for real, genuine Gospel 
work all over the world than are presented now. Never was 
there a time when the North Carolina Synod of the Evan- 
gelical Lutheran Church was more needed than at the present 
period of its history. , 



RETROSPECTIVE AND PROSPECTIVE. 97 

Opening out before us are wide and ever-widening fields for 
the sowing of the ' ' good seed. ' ' 

In the field of few other Synods in America is there such an 
open door for work and usefulness as in our now time-honored 
.Synod of North Carolina. 

The Master of the vineyard is certainly calling ! 

God help the Synod to hear and heed the call. 



SKETCHES OF CONGREGATIONS 



now connected with the 



Evangelical Lutheran Synod 
and Ministerium 



NORTH CAROLINA. 



Albemarle Church, located in the town of Albemarle,, 
the county seat of Stanly County, was organized by Rev. W. 
Kimball in 1880. Its house of worship was erected in 188 1. It 
is a small frame building, neatly painted, churchly in all its 
appointments, and was dedicated 1881 by Rev. W. Kimball and 
J. B. Davis, D. D., the latter preaching the dedicatory sermon. 

The congregation also has a very comfortable and convenient 
parsonage, containing six rooms, located near the church, and 
built in 1898. Mrs. S. H. Hearne, one of the leading members 
of the congregation, has the honor of having been the prime 
mover in securing the parsonage, she having, by her own individ- 
ual efforts, raised nearly all the funds for the undertaking. The 
congregation has thirty-three members. 

Pastors. 

Rev. W. Kimball, Rev. J. A. Linn, 

Rev. G. F. Schaeffer, Rev. J. D. Shirey, D. D., 

Rev. A. D. L. Moser, Rev. P. L. Miller, 

Rev. John+H. Wyse, Rev. C. B. Miller. 

(98) 



SKETCHES OF CONGREGATIONS. 99 

Amity Church is located in Iredell County, N. C, twelve 
miles south from Statesville. 

The congregation, which was formerly a part of St. Michael's, 
was organized April nth, 1885, by Rev. H. M. Brown. It has 
never been a large congregation ; now numbers forty-one mem- 
bers. 

The house of worship was erected 1888-1891, and was dedi- 
cated April 30th, 1893, by the pastor, Rev. D. W. Michael, as- 
sisted by Rev. W. S. Bowman, D. D. It is a frame building, 
56 x 36, nicely finished, and well adapted to the wants of the 
congregation. Its seating capacity is three hundred and fifty. 

Pastors. 

Rev. H. M. Brown 1885— 1888. 

Rev. W. Kimball 1888— 1889. 

Rev. T. H. Strohecker 1889— 1890. 

Rev. D. W. Michael 1890— 1894. 

Rev. H. W. Jeffcoat „ . . 1894—1895, 

Rev. B. S. Brown 1895 — 1899.. 

Rev. R. A. Helms 1899. 



Augsburg Church, in the city of Winston, is a mission con- 
gregation under control of the Board of Missions of the United 
Synod. The mission was inaugurated in 1890, and the congre- 
gation was organized by the missionary pastor, Rev. W. A. Lutz, 
on September 27th, 1891. The congregation worshiped in a 
rented hall until the present church building was erected in* 
1893-95, and was dedicated, in 1895, by Rev. F. W. E. Peschau,. 
D. D., Rev. W. S. Bowman, D. D., and the pastor, Rev. W. 
A. Lutz. It is a stone and brick structure, of gothic style,. 
50x72, and beautifully finished both inside and out, and has a 
seating capacity of four hundred and fifty. Rev. W. A. Lutz; 
resigned July 1st, 1900, and Rev. E. L. Folk became pastor in' 
February, 1901. 

New Bethel Church is located in Stanly County, N. C.„ 
about ten miles northwest from Albemarle. 

Some time between 1788 and 1806 members of the Lutheran 



IOO HISTORY OF NORTH CAROLINA SYNOD. 

and German Reformed Churches were organized into a union 
congregation, it is supposed by Rev. C. A. G. Storch, and 
erected a house of worship near Bear Creek, in Stanly County, 
about two miles from the present location. 

The congregation was named "Bethel," but was popularly 
known as " Bear Creek Church," because of its location. Thus 
it continued until 1874, when the Lutherans, for a money con- 
sideration, surrendered all claim to the property, and built a new 
house at the present location, the congregation taking the name 
of " New Bethel Evangelical Lutheran Church." The building 
was dedicated November 29th, 1874, by Rev. W. Kimball and 
Rev. P. A. Strobel. It is a neat frame building, 60 x 40, with 
a seating capacity of about five hundred. 

In 1888, while under the pastorship of Rev. George H. Cox, 
the congregation erected a parsonage near the church. It is a 
neat, one-story building, containing six rooms, nicely painted, 
having a well of good water, all necessary outbuildings, and 
several acres of land. 

The congregation now numbers one hundred and forty-nine 
members. 



Pastors. 

Rev. C. A. G. Storch 1S06- 

Rev. John William Meyer 1814- 

Rev. C. A. G. Storch 1819- 

Rev. Daniel Scherer 1824- 

Rev. Daniel Jenkins ^34- 

Rev. Benjamin Arey 1837- 

Rev. P. A. Strobel 183S- 

Rev. William G. Harter . 1841- 

Rev. J. D. Scheck 1856- 

Rev. G. D. Bernheim 1858- 

Rev. J. B. Anthony 1860- 

Rev. L. C. Groseclose 1867- 

Rev. W. R. Ketchie 1873. 

Rev. P. A. Strobel 1S74- 

Rev. S. Rothrock, D. D 1S76- 

Rev. W. Kimball 1S80- 

Rev. A. D. L. Moser 1SS5- 

Rev. G. H. Cox 1888- 

Rev. C. C. Lyerly 1890- 



814. 
817. 
824. 
831. 

836. 



856. 

857. 
860. 
866. 
871. 

875- 
879. 
883. 
S87. 
890. 
892. 



SKETCHES OF CONGREGATIONS. 

Pastors. 

Rev. J. H. C. Fisher 1893— 1894. 

Rev. C. C. Lyerly 1894 — 1897. 

Rev. J. A. Linn, present pastor, took charge October 2d, 1898. 



Bethel Church is located in Rowan County, N. C, four 
miles northwest from Salisbury. The congregation was first 
known as " Franklin." It was organized by Rev. Jacob Crim, 
in March, 1851, with twenty -one members. The first entry 
under the name of Bethel occurs in 1854. The first house of 
worship was erected a short distance from the present site. In 
a few years a small village grew up about half a mile west from 
the church. As a new church house was needed it was proposed 
to rebuild in the village. This, however, was opposed, and as a 
compromise the new house was erected midway between the old 
site and the village. It is one of the most beautiful church sites 
within the bounds of the Synod. The building is a frame, 
60 x 40, beautiful in all its parts, and comfortably seats three 
hundred and fifty. Present membership is one hundred and fifty- 
two. Dedicated April 29th, 1883, by Revs. J. B. Davis, D.D., and 
V. R. Stickley. Three ministers have been reared in the con- 
gregation, viz.: Revs. M. M. Miller, Turner Earnhardt, and 
P. E. Monroe. Rev. M. M. Miller is buried in the graveyard. 
He was killed in skirmish near Richmond, Va., June 7th, 1864. 

A commodious and convenient parsonage stands in the village 
of Zeb. It has eight rooms and all necessary conveniences, and 
is owned jointly by this congregation and St. Paul's, with which 
it is in pastorate relation. 

Pastors. 

Rev. Jacob Crim 1S51 — 1858 

Rev. J. L. Smithdeal 1858— 1860 

Rev. Jacob Crim 1S61 — 1862 

Rev. S. Scherer ' 1862 — 1872 

Rev. S. Rothrock, D. D 1872 — 1873 

Rev. H. M. Brown 1873— 1882 

Rev. V. R. Stickley 1882— 1884 

Rev. C. A. Rose 1884 — 1899 

Rev. V. Y. Boozer 1 899 



102 HISTORY OF NORTH CAROLINA SYNOD. 

Bethany Church, located in Stokes County, N. C, six 
miles south from Danbury. On the fifth Sunday in June, 1889, 
Rev. H. M. Brown, who was then the pastor of the Forsythe 
Mission, by invitation of Mr. B. F. Pulliam, preached at Flat 
•Shoals school -house. He returned on the second Sunday in 
August and held a meeting for several days, and as a result Mr. 
B. F. Pulliam and Mrs. Golden united with the Evangelical 
Lutheran Church by the sacrament of baptism. Others soon 
followed, so that on the 9th of November, 1889, Bethany con- 
gregation was organized with D. M. Hall, Elder, and B. F. 
Pulliam, Deacon, there being five other members. 

A neat frame church building was erected in 1890, the corner- 
stone having been laid in August by Rev. C. B. Miller. No 
special dedicatory services have been held. The house is 
40 x 30, and comfortably seats about two hundred and fifty. The 
present membership is twenty-five. The congregation holds an 
interest in the parsonage of the Forsythe Mission. 

Pastors. 

Rev. H. M. Brown 1889 — 1891. 

Rev. E. P. Parker 1891 — 1892. 

Rev. H. A. Trexler 1892 — 1896. 

Rev. R. L. Bame 1896— 1897. 



Bethany Church, located in Davidson County, N. C. 
Traditions says that emigrants from Pennsylvania settled here 
in 1791, and very soon thereafter organized a union congrega- 
tion. The old deed of land is to " The Lutheran and German 
Presbyterians," but the congregation is now composed of Luth- 
erans and German Reformed. 

The first house of worship was erected at about the same time 
that the congregation was organized, and has long since passed 
away. 

The present frame structure was erected in 1 86 1 . It is 60 x 40, 
and seats five hundred persons. It was dedicated by Rev. W. 
Kimball. Rev. John Swicegood was reared in this congregation. 



SKETCHES OF CONGREGATIONS. IO3 

The congregation has an interest in the parsonage at Tyro. 

Pastors. 

Rev. Daniel Jenkins, Rev. E. P. Parker, 

Rev. John Swicegood, Rev. W. A. Lutz, 

Rev. W. Kimball, Rev. H. A. Trexler, 

Rev. C. H. Bernheim, Rev. R. L. Bame. 
Rev. J. D. Bowles, 

The congregation has never seemed to prosper, and has been 
vacant often and during long intervals. 



Christiana Church is located on the Gold Hill Road, 
six miles southeast from Salisbury, N. C. It was organized 
January 23d, 1871, by Rev. S. Scherer. Its first house of wor- 
ship, a frame building, 50 x 35, was erected in 1874. In 1898, 
while under the pastorate of Rev. C. A. Brown, the old house 
was removed, and a beautiful modern building, 65 x 50, was 
erected in its place. This house was dedicated by Rev. L. E. 
Busby on January 1st, 1899. The congregation has one hun- 
dred and twenty members on the roll. 

The following have served the congregation : 

Pastors. 
Rev. S. Scherer, Rev. J. Q. Wertz, 

Rev. R. L. Brown, Rev. C. A. Brown, 

Rev. J. M. Hedrick, Rev. J. P. Miller. 

Rev. J. W. Strickler, 



Coldwater Church is located near Coldwater Creek, two 
miles east from Concord, in Cabarrus County, N. C. It was 
first a German Reformed congregation, and as such dates back 
as far as 1768, five years before Nussman and Arends came 
from Germany. 

About 1782 the Lutherans belonging to St. John's Church, 
.and living in the neighborhood of Coldwater Creek, joined with 



io4 



HISTORY OF NORTH CAROLINA SYNOD. 



the German Reformed to form a union congregation. Land for 
a church site was deeded to the congregation, in that year, by 
Adam Bowers, and Martin Phifer was made Trustee of the con- 
gregation. The house that was built was of hewn logs, and was 
not completed until about 1834. 

In 1S14 the congregation was admitted to Synod, and it is 
probable that about that time it was organized as a Lutheran 
congregation, worshiping with the German Reformed. 

In 1843 most of the Lutherans belonging to the congregation 
withdrew for the purpose of organizing a congregation at Con- 
cord, which congregation has since been known as St. James'. 
This left the congregation so weak that no Lutheran services 
were held there again until 1871, when the organization became 
an independent Lutheran congregation. 

In 1880 the present house of worship was erected. It is 
small, but very neat and churchly. There are forty-three mem- 
bers belonging to it. 



Pastors. 



Rev. C. A. G. Storch, 
Rev. P. A. Strobel, 
Rev. W. G. Harter, 
Rev. L. A. Bikle, D. D. 
Rev. J. H. Harry, 
Rev. S. T. Hallman, 



Rev. J. S. Heilig, 
Rev. W. Kimball, 
Rev. J. M. Hedrick, 
Rev. J. D. Shealy, 
Rev. H. A. McCullough. 



Centre Grove Church is located in Cabarrus County, N. C. r 
five miles north from Concord. It was organized by Rev. W. 
Kimball on September 9th, 1876, and was composed of mem- 
bers from Lutheran Chapel Church. 

The house is a handsome frame building, 50 x 30, nicely 
finished, and has a seating capacity for four hundred. It was 
dedicated the first Sunday in April, 1880,. by Rev. W. H. Cone, 
assisted by Rev. V. R. Stickley. 

The congregation had an interest in the St. Andrew's par- 
sonage at Concord, which was destroyed by fire September 21st,. 
1900. 



SKETCHES OK CONGREGATIONS. I05 

Pastors. 
Rev. W. H. Cone for three years. 
Rev. B. S. Brown for four years. 
Rev. J. L. Buck for three years. 
Rev. C. A. Marks for six years. 
Rev. J. Q. Wertz for two years. 
Rev. W. B. Oney for two years. 
Rev. C. A. Brown since May, 1900. 

The aggregate of vacancies is about three years. 



Concordia Church is located in Rowan County, N. C, 
fifteen miles southwest from Salisbury, on the Mooresville and 
Concord Road. 

The congregation was organized in 1882 by Rev. W. A. Lutz, 
and was made up of families from Lutheran Chapel and St. 
Enoch's Churches. 

The house of worship is a frame structure, 70 x 50, well 
finished and nicely furnished, and was erected in 18S2 and 
1883, and dedicated in the year 1SS3 by Rev. W. A. Lutz, 
assisted by Rev. G. D. Bernheim, D. D., and Rev. S. T. Hall- 
man, D. D. Its seating capacity is eight hundred, and the 
present membership numbers one hundred and fourteen. 

The congregation owns a parsonage located at " Saw" Post- 
office, about one and one-half miles from the church. It is an 
excellent frame building, two stories high, with an L, contain- 
ing seven rooms, and having many conveniences for the pastors. 

Pastors. 

Rev. W. A. Lutz 18S2— 1883. 

Rev. Holmes Dysinger, D. D 1S83. 

Rev. W. Kimball 1884— 1SS5. 

Rev. C. B. Miller, supply 18S6. 

Rev. C. A. Brown, supply 1S87. 

Rev. D. A. Sox 1887— 1888. 

Rev. W. Kimball 1889— 1S91. 

Rev. C. A. Brown 1892 — 1893. 

Rev. H. W. Jeffcoat l &94 — 1900. 

Rev. B. S. Brown 1900. 



Io6 HISTORY OF NORTH CAROLINA SYNOD. 

Christ Church is located in the town of Spencer, Rowan 
County, N. C. 

The congregation was organized in a school -house, about two 
miles northeast from Spencer, by Rev. Simeon Scherer, Novem- 
ber 13th, 1870. 

The first house of worship was built on the Lexington Road, 
three and one-half miles east from Salisbury. The present house 
is a nice frame building, 60 x 36, with seating capacity of about 
four hundred. It was erected in 1899. Present membership 
forty-six. 

Pastors. 

Rev. S. Scherer 1870— 1875 

Rev. H. M. Brown 1875— 1880 

Rev. W. J. Smith 1881— 1882 

Rev. V. R. Stickley 1882— 1884 

Rev. C. A. Rose 1884— 1897 

Rev. W. Kimball 1897— 1898 

Rev. P. L. Miller 1898— 1900 

Rev. H. W. Jeffcoat 1900. 



Ebenezer Church is located in Rowan County, five miles 
west from Organ Church and four miles east from China Crove. 
It was formerly a part of the western district of Organ congrega- 
tion. In December, 1866, members of Organ Church living in 
the above-named community petitioned the Southern Confer- 
ence of the North Carolina Synod to authorize the formation of 
a new congregation, for their benefit, somewhere near " Bos- 
tian's school-house." 

The conference granted the request and appointed the Rev. 
G. D. Bernheim, D. D., with Dr. P. A. Sifferd and Captain J. 
A. Fisher as a special committee to attend to the matter. At 
the annual meeting of Synod in May, 1867, this action of the 
conference was ratified and confirmed ; whereupon the commit- 
tee, on the first Sunday in June, 1867, organized the congrega- 



SKETCHES OF CONGREGATIONS. I07 

tion as Ebenezer Evangelical Lutheran Church, there being 
nineteen members entering into the organization. 

The first council was elected upon the same day, and con- 
sisted of Dr. P. A. Sifferd and Frederick Stirewalt, Elders ; and 
Moses J. Barger and J. A. Eddleman, Deacons. 

A lot, containing three and one-half acres, was donated by 
Frederick and Paul Stirewalt, and the church was built thereon 
during the year 1868. It is an excellent frame building, 60 x 40, 
nicely finished inside and out. 

The dedicatory services were held by the pastor, Rev. G. D. 
Bernheim, D. D., on January 31st, 1869, the sermon being 
delivered by the Rev. Prof. L. A. Bikle, D. D., who was at the 
time President of North Carolina College. 

In 1879 tne congregation was, by Synod, placed in pastorate 
relationship with Organ Church, and in 1887 the pastorate 
erected a parsonage near Organ Church, Ebenezer, holding a 
one-third interest in the same. 

The present membership of the congregation is one hundred 
and twenty -three. 

The congregation has had but very little vacancy since its 
organization, having been served as follows : 

Pashvs. 

Rev. G. D. Bernheim, D. D 1867— 1870. 

Rev. Prof. L. A. Bikle, D. D 1870— 1875. 

Rev. W. Kimball 1S75 — 1876. 

Rev. R. W. Petrea 1876 — 1877. 

Rev. Prof. S. S. Rahn 1S78— 1879. 

Rev. S. Rothrock, D. D 1879— 1885. 

Rev. W. R. Brown 1886— 1893. 

Rev. George H. Cox 1 894. 



Faith Church, in the village of Faith, Rowan County, 
N. C.j six miles south from Salisbury, was organized by Rev. R. 
L. Brown, on March 26th, 1899. The church building was 
erected during 1899-1900, and is a handsome frame structure, 



108 HISTORY OF NORTH CAROLINA SYNOD. 

56x34, built after the style of modern church architecture, with 
seating capacity of about three hundred. The corner-stone was 
laid February 17th, 1900, by the President of Synod, Rev. C. B. 
Miller, assisted by Revs. G. H. Cox, C. A. Brown, V. Y. 
Boozer, and R. L. Brown. The congregation numbers sixty- 
three members, and bids fair to become a strong church. 



Frieden's Church is located two miles north from Gibson- 
ville, in Guilford County, N. C. This is one of the oldest Lutheran 
churches in North Carolina. Although we do not know just 
when it was organized, yet we do know that it was prior to the 
Revolutionary War. During that war there was a man by the 
name of Schumaker lived a few hundred yards from the church. 
This man was a "Tory," and, upon a certain occasion, refused 
to give a drink of water to a wounded soldier. This so infuri- 
ated his companions that they took the man Schumaker to the 
church, made him stand on the door-steps, and shot him there. 
He is buried in the old graveyard. From this circumstance the 
church was often called " Schumaker' s Church." Originally 
the congregation was composed of Lutherans and German Re- 
formed, who had together come from Pennsylvania. About the 
year 1855 they separated, and it has since been wholly Lutheran. 

There have been three houses of worship. The first was con- 
structed of pine poles ; the second was a log-house, weather- 
boarded and ceiled ; and the present is a fine brick building, with 
a seating capacity of about five hundred. It was erected in 1869 
and 1870, and was dedicated May 2 2d, 1S71, by the pastor, 
Rev. C. H. Bernheim, assisted by Rev. S. Rothrock, D. D. , 
and Rev. G. D. Bernheim, D. D. 

The congregation has always been numerically strong, though, 
at present, but one hundred and seventy-eight members are re- 
ported. 

In the graveyard near the church lie buried Rev. Simeon 
Scherer and Rev. J. R. Sikes, both of whom were born in the 
county and died while pastors of the church. 



SKETCHES OF CONGREGATIONS. 



109 



An excellent parsonage, belonging to the pastorate, stands in 
the town of Gibsonville, on the N. C. R. R. It is a frame 
structure, with two stories and an L, containing six rooms. A 
garden, barn, and other outhouses are attached, making a very 
comfortable and convenient home for the pastor. 

The list of pastors is incomplete, no records having been 
kept of the early history of the congregation. The following 
is measurably correct : 



Pastors. 



Rev. Philip Henkel, 
Rev. G. Schober, 
Rev. Jacob Scherer, 
Rev. William Artz, 
Rev. Simeon Scherer, 
Rev. J. D. Sheck, 
Rev. L. C. Groseclose, 
Rev. S. Rothrock, D. D., 



Rev. C. H. Bernheim, 
Rev. W. Kimball, 
Rev. J. L. Buck, 
Rev. C. B. Miller, 
Rev. J. R. Sikes, 
Rev. E. P. Parker, 
Rev. C. A. Brown. 



Grace Church is located six miles southwest from Salisbury, 
between Salisbury and China Grove. The organization was 
effected in 1880, by the Rev. V. R. Stickley, and was composed 
of members from Salem and Lutheran Chapel congregations. 

Its house of worship, a neat frame building, 60x35, with a 
seating capacity of four hundred, was erected in 1880, and ded- 
icated by Rev. W. A. Lutz in 1881. 

Belonging to the Salem pastorate, it holds a joint interest in 
the parsonage near that church. 

The present membership numbers one hundred and ninety. 

Pastors. 

Rev. V. R. Stickley 18S0— 18S2. 

Rev. J- D. Shirey, D. D 1S82— 1887. 

Rev. W. Kimball 1SS9— 1892. 

Rev. C. A. Brown 1S92 — 1894. 

Rev. V. Y. Boozer 1894 — 1895. 

Rev. H. N. Miller, Ph. D 1S95— 1897. 

Rev. II. A. Trexler I ^>97. 

The aggregate of vacancies has been a little over two years. 



IIO HISTORY OF NORTH CAROLINA SYNOD. 

Holy Trinity Church, in the town of Mt. Pleasant, Cabar- 
rus County, N. C, was organized about 1864, by Rev. L. C. 
Groseclose. The congregation worshiped in the chapel of North 
Carolina College until 1872, when its present church build- 
ing was erected. It is a substantial brick structure, 50 x 40, 
having vestibule, tower, and bell, with the auditorium neatly 
frescoed. The congregation owns a good parsonage on a lot 
adjoining the church lot. It is a two-story frame building, con- 
taining seven rooms and suitable outbuildings. There are now 
one hundred and fifty-three members belonging to it. The grave- 
yard is located in the northern part of the town, about a half- 
mile from the church. Here, among many others, lie buried 
Rev. J. B. Anthony and Rev. J. D. Shirey, D. D. 

The following named pastors have served the congregation at 

different times : 

Pastors, 
Rev. L. C. Groseclose, Rev. B. S. Brown, 

Rev. D. M. Henkel, Rev. H. N. Miller, Ph. D., 

Rev. S. B. Davis, D. D., Rev. J. A. Linn. 

Rev. J. H. Wyse, 



Hopewell Church is located five miles south from Winston, 
N. C.j on the road leading to Lexington. The land upon 
which the church stands was originally donated by Mr. Henry 
Rippel. He erected a school-house upon it, in which he and 
Rev. G. Schober, in 1807, organized the first Sunday school 
ever established in North Carolina. This was the beginning of 
the congregation that was organized by Rev. Schober in 18 10. 

The first house of worship was erected in 1810, and was ded- 
icated in March, 1811. It was a log-house, 32x20, with end 
and side galleries. It had a bell, which was moulded by Mr. 
Rippel, and which is now preserved in the Museum in Salem, 
N. C. 

The second house of worship was erected in 1896, and was 
dedicated in March, 1897, by the officers of the Northern Con- 
ference of the North Carolina Synod. It is a neat frame build- 



SKETCHES OF CONGREGATIONS. Ill 

ing, 54x28, well finished and nicely furnished. The present 
membership is only nine persons, and never has been large. 

Its first pastor was Rev. G. Schober, who served the congre- 
gation for twenty-six years, until 1836, without accepting any 
salary at all. Since then there have been no regular pastors, 
but the following have supplied the congregation for longer or 
shorter periods : 

Pastors. 

Rev. L. C. Croseclose, Rev. W. A. Lutz, 

Rev. W. Kimball, Rev. R. L. Brown, 

Rev. J. R. Sikes, Rev. E. P. Parker, 

Rev. W. A. Julian, Rev. E. L. Folk. 
Rev. J. D. Bowles, 



Haven Church is located on Chestnut Hill, West Salis- 
bury, N. C. The congregation was organized August 13th, 
1899, by Rev. W. A. Julian, and was first called Mt. Zion. 

The congregation is erecting a very nice building, 50x34, 
with a tower seventy feet high, which, when done, will be hand- 
some and churchly, and will comfortably seat about three hun- 
dred and fifty persons. 

The work is a mission of the North Carolina Synod and bids 
fair to become a prosperous congregation. The present member- 
ship is sixty -six. 

Pastors. 

Rev. W. A. Julian to September, 1899. 
Rev. H. W. Jeffcoat present pastor. 



Immanuel Church is located in Rowan County, N. C, 
midway between Rockwell and Gold Hill. 

For something like thirty years a Sunday school had been 
maintained in Elm Grove school-house, with occasional preach- 
ing service by the different pastors of Organ Church up until 
April 14th, 1895, when Rev. George H. Cox organized the con- 
gregation and served as the first pastor. 



112 HISTORY OF NORTH CAROLINA SYNOD. 

The house of worship is a very neat brick building, nicely fin- 
ished, which was dedicated by Rev. H. M. Brown in October, 
1S98. 

The present membership is forty-seven. 

Pastors. 
Rev. George H. Cox, Rev. Prof. J. H. C. Fisher. 

Rev. R. L. Brown, 



Lau's Church is located in Guilford County, N. C, eigh-' 
teen miles southeast from Greensboro and two miles from the 
Alamance battle-ground, where was fought the battle between the 
British and the Regulators in May, 1 7 7 1 . 

No early records have been preserved, but the congregation 
must have been organized at a very early date, probably by 
Nussman or Arends, who made frequent ministerial journeys into 
that section of country. The congregation has always been 
Lutheran, never having united with the German Reformed, as so 
many of the early congregations did. 

When the first house of worship was built, how long it was 
used, and what was its character, nothing is known except that 
it was the inevitable log-house of the pioneer period. 

The second house was a frame building. Both houses stood 
very near the present location. The present building is a neat 
frame structure, with a roomy vestibule, and the pulpit between 
the doors as you enter the auditorium. It is 60 x 40, and has a 
seating capacity of five hundred. 

Just in the rear of the church is the old graveyard, where lie 
the earthly remains of two Lutheran ministers, Rev. Jacob 
Grieson and Rev. B. C. Hall. 

The congregation no doubt participated in the organization of 
the Synod in 1803, and took an active part in discussions and 
struggles growing out of the rupture that resulted in the forma- 
tion of the Tennessee Synod. 

It has always been a strong congregation, and now numbers 
two hundred and twenty-three confirmed members. 



SKETCHES OF CONGREGATIONS. 113 

Near the church stands the parsonage, belonging to the churches 
comprising the "Guilford pastorate." It is a comfortable and 
convenient house, containing nine rooms. There are also neces- 
sary outbuildings, and fifteen acres of land for the use of the 
pastor. 

Pastors. 

Rev. A. Nussman, Rev. B. C. Hall, 

Rev. J. G. Arends, Rev. W. A. Julian, 

Rev. Ludwig Markert, Rev. E. P. Parker, 

Rev. Jacob Scherer, Rev. A. D. L. Moser, 

Rev. William Artz, Rev. B. W. Cronk, 

Rev. John Swicegood, Rev. H. M. Brown. 
Rev. Simeon Scherer, 



Lebanon Church, located in Rowan County, N. C, two 
miles from Barber's Junction, on the " Western " Railroad, was 
organized by Rev. B. W. Cronk in 1893. 

In the same year the present church-house was erected. It is 
a frame building, 60 x 35, with a seating capacity of three hun- 
dred and fifty, and nicely finished. 

It was dedicated by Rev. H. N. Miller, Ph. D., on the fifth 
Sunday in November, 1896. The congregation numbers thirty- 
four members. 

Pastors. 

Rev. B. W. Cronk 1S90— 1S94. 

Rev. V. Y. Boozer 1894 — 1895. 

Rev. H. X. Miller, Ph. D 1895— 1S97. 

Rev. H. A. Trexler 1897. 



Lutheran Chapel Church is located in Rowan County, 
N. C, about one mile from China Grove. It is one among the 
oldest congregations, and, like all the rest, has failed to preserve 
any early records. From other facts that are known, it is evident 
that the congregation must have been organized about 1780, by 



114 HISTORY OF NORTH CAROLINA SYNOD. 

either Nussman or Arends, and was served by them until January 
7th, 1789, when Rev. C. A. G. Storch became pastor. It was 
then known as the Irish Settlement. 

During this time, that is, between 1780 and 1789, the first 
house of worship was erected, and was owned jointly with the 
German Reformed. The building was painted red, and was 
known as Savitz's Church. It was destroyed by fire by a crazy 
man because it was not painted blue. 

In a short time another house was erected on the same spot, 
and was again painted red. Between 1820-1830 the Lutherans 
were greatly wrought up on the questions then agitating the 
Church, which resulted in a division and the formation of an- 
other congregation, adhering to the Tennessee Synod. Thus 
there were now three congregations, each having its own pastor, 
and worshiping in the same house. This state of affairs continued 
until about 1835, when a general separation took place, each 
congregation building a house for itself. 

Thus the third house of worship was erected, and took the 
name of Luther's Chapel, which has since been changed to 
Lutheran Chapel Church. This was a frame building, and was 
unpainted. In 1865 the old church was removed, and a large 
brick edifice was erected in its place. This continued in use 
until 1892, when it was thoroughly remodeled and rededicated, 
May 7th, 1893, the sermon being delivered by the President of 
Synod, Rev. G. H. Cox, D. D. It is one of the most beautiful 
churches in the Synod. The congregation has always been large 
and always loyally Lutheran, and has taken an active part in all 
the work of the Synod, of which it was an original member. The 
congregation is thoroughly organized and equipped, and has a 
membership of two hundred and ten. 

In the graveyard lie buried Rev. W. Kimball, Rev. C. A. 
Rose, and Mr. I. F. Patterson, who was for a number of years 
the Treasurer of Synod. 

The congregation has an excellent parsonage, one mile from 
■ the church, in the town of China Grove. It is a large frame 
building, two stories, seven rooms, and has all conveniences and 
comforts for the pastor and family. 



SKETCHES OF CONGREGATIONS. 



IX 5 



Pastors. 

Revs. A. Nussman and J. G. Arends 1780 — 1789 

Rev. C. A. G. Storch 1789— 1820 

Rev. Daniel Scherer. ... 1820 — 1830 

Rev. Jacob Kaempfer tSjO — 1833 

Rev. Henry Graeber l &33 — ^37 

Rev. J. D. Scheck 1837— 1S54 

Rev. S. Rothrock, D. D 1854— 1855 

Rev. B. C. Hall 1S55 — 1857 

Rev. William Artz 1859 — 1861 

Rev. Whitson Kimball 1861 — 1877 

Rev. W. H. Cone 1877— 1881 

Rev. B. S. Brown 1881 — 1887 

Rev. J. L. Buck 1887— iS" 

Rev. C. A. Marks 1889—18 

Rev. J. Q. Wertz. 1896. 



Luther Memorial Church is located at the southern point 
of Rowan County, N. C, about four miles from Richfield. 

The first mention of the congregation is in the Minutes of 
Synod for 1830. At that time the Rev. J. Kaempfer was pas- 
tor. It is not known when it was organized. 

The present house of worship was erected during the pastor- 
ship of Rev. T. H. Strohecker, and was dedicated September 7th, 
1883, by the pastor, assisted by Rev. S. Rothrock, D. D., Rev. 
J. B. Anthony, and Rev. J. A. Linn, Jr. 

It is a very pretty frame building, 60 x 40, with a seating 
capacity of about three hundred. The present membership is 
fifty-five. 

Pastors. 

Rev. Jacob Kaempfer •. 1832. 

Rev. H. Graeber 1832 — 1841. 

Rev. S. Rothrock, D. D 1841 — 1845. 

Rev. J. A. Linn, Sr 1S46 — 1852. 

Rev. W. G. Harter 1853— 1S56. 

Rev. J. A. Linn, Sr 1856— 1863. 

Rev. L. C. Groseclose 1866 — 1867. 

Rev. R. L. Brown 1868— 1874. 

Rev. W. H. Cone 1875 — 1S77. 

Rev. J. A. Linn, Jr 1S7S— 1880. 



n6 



HISTORY OF NORTH CAROLINA SYNOD. 



Pastors. 
Rev. T. H. Strohecker. 
Rev. H. A. Trexler.. . 
Rev. S. Rothrock, D. D 
Rev. C. C. Lyerly 
Rev. J. H. C. Fisher.. 
Rev. C. C. Lyerly .... 
Rev. P. H. E. Derrick , 
Rev. P. L. Miller 



883— 1886 
886—1888 
888—1889 
891 — 1892 
894 — 1896 
897—1898 
898—1899 
899. 



Macedonia Church is located in the town of Burlington, 
Alamance County, N. C, on the line of the Southern Railroad, 
between Greensboro and Raleigh. 

In 1869, citizens of Burlington (then Company Shops) and 
vicinity, petitioned the Synod to establish a mission at that 
place, and assist them in the support of a regular pastor. The 
Synod granted the request, and made Rev. W. A. Julian the 
pastor. That was at the regular session in April, 1S69. A 
congregation was immediately organized, and at an extra session 
of Synod held in August, 1869, it was received into Synod. 

The church building was erected in 1879 and 1880, and was 
dedicated on the fourth Sunday in April, 1880, by the pastor, 
Rev. W. Kimball, assisted by Rev. G. D. Bernheim, D. D., 
who preached the dedicatory sermon. The house is a neat 
frame, 36 x 22, with a seating capacity of about three hundred. 
The number of members is now one hundred and ten. 

The congregation owns an excellent parsonage on the adjoin- 
ing lot to the church. It is a two-story frame, nicely finished 
in every particular. It was erected in 1894 during the pastor- 
ship of Rev. C. B, Miller. The congregation is not yet self- 
sustaining. 

Pastors. 

Rev. W. A. Julian 1869— 1873. 

Rev. S. Scherer 1873 — 1876. 

Rev. W. Kimball 1876— 1880. 

Rev. J. L. Buck 1882— 1887. 

Rev. C. B. Miller 1890 — 1895. 

Rev. V. V. Boozer 1895 — 18 99- 

Rev. W. W. J. Ritchie 1899. 



SKETCHES OF CONGREGATIONS. 117 

Mount Zion Church is located on the Yadkin Railroad, in 
the village of Richfield, Stanly County, N. C. 

The congregation was organized by Rev. C. C. Lyerly, Octo- 
ber 14th, 1894, with twenty-one members transferred from 
"Luther's," two from "New Bethel," and two from "Matin's 
Grove Methodist Episcopal Church, making a total of twenty- 
five. 

The house of worship is a small frame building, 48 x 32, nicely 
finished, and churchly in all of its appointments. It was 
erected during the pastorship of Rev. C. C. Lyerly. The present 
membership is fifty-three. 

Pastors. 

Rev. C. C. Lyerly 1894— 1897. 

Rev. P. L. Miller 1898— 1900. 



Mount Hermon Church is located in Cabarrus County, 
N. C, four miles southeast from Concord. 

The congregation was organized by Rev. S. T. Hallman,. 
D. D., on April 17th, 1881, and was composed of members, 
transferred from St. John's and St. James' Churches. Its house 
of worship, a neat frame building, was erected in 1881, and 
dedicated April 15th, 18S8, by Rev. A. D. L. Moser. It is 
54x36, nicely finished inside and out, and has a seating ca- 
pacity of three hundred and fifty. There are at the present time 
eighty-five members. It had an interest in the St. Andrew's 
parsonage at Concord, which was destroyed by fire September 
21st, 1900. 

Pastors. 

Rev. S. T. Mailman, D. D 18S0— 1883. 

Rev. G. F. Schaefter 1884. 

Rev. W. Kimball 1884— 1886. 

Rev. J. M. Hedrick 1889— 1893. 

Rev. J. D. Shealey 1894 — 1895. 

Rev. H. A. McCullough 1895— 1898. 

Rev. W. B. Oney 189S — 1900. 

Rev. C. A. Brown 1900. 

The aggregate of vacancies has been about three years. 



II 8 HISTORY OF NORTH CAROLINA SYNOD. 

Mount Olive Church is located in Cabarrus County, N. 
C, five miles northwest from Mount Pleasant. 

The congregation was organized at Moose's school-house, 
April 28th, 1878, by Rev. R. W. Petrea, the pastor of St. John's 
Church, with twenty-one members, nearly all from St. John's. 
Mr. John Moose offered to donate the lot upon which the school- 
house stood ; the offer was accepted, and in a very short time 
a part of the necessary lumber was on the lot. Then it was de- 
cided to change to the present location. The work of building 
"Was rapidly advanced, and the house was dedicated November 
2d, 1879. I* ' s an excellent frame structure, 50x40, churchly 
in all its appointments, and has a seating capacity of about five 
hundred. At the time of the dedication there were fifty-one 
members. Now there are one hundred and forty-eight. 

The congregation was received into the Synod April 30th, 
1879. 

It has an interest in the parsonage at St. Stephen's, with which 
it is in pastorate relation. 

Pastors. 

Rev. R. W. Petrea 1878— 1882 

Rev. W. Kimball 1882— 1883 

Rev. J. B. Davis, D. D 1884— 18S5 

Rev. A. D. L. Moser 1S87— 1888 

Rev. George II. Cox, D. D 1888— 1S94. 

Rev. J. M. Lingle 1894 — 1895 

Rev. P. H. E. Derrick 1895— 1896 

Rev. George A. Riser 1898 — 1899 

Rev. W. A. Dutton 1900. 



Nazareth Church is located in Forsythe County, N. C, a 
short distance from Rural Hall. It is one of the oldest congre- 
gations in the Synod, having been organized somewhere about 
1785, and in all probability by Rev. A. Nussman. 

For a long time the congregation worshiped in a school- 
house ; then an old-time log church was built ; then, in 1878, a 
brick' church was erected, which was dedicated November 27th, 



SKETCHES OF CONGREGATIONS. II9 

1879, by the members of the Northern Conference, Rev. L. A. 
Bikle, D. D., preaching the sermon. 

The house is 45 x 35, and nicely finished. The present num- 
ber of members is ninety-eight. 

Pastors. 

Rev. A. Nussman, Rev. W. Kimball, 

Rev. A. Roschen, Rev. J. D. Bowles, 

Rev. P. Henkel, Rev. W. A. Lutz, 

Rev. G. Shober, Rev. E. P. Parker, 

Rev. J. P. Rosenmiiller, Rev. R. L. Brown, 

Rev. J. Crim, Rev. H. A. Trexler, 

Rev. M. M. Miller, Rev. R. L. Bame. 
Rev. John Swicegood, 



Zion (everywhere and by everybody known as Organ 
Church) is located in Rowan County, N. C. , ten miles south from 
Salisbury, on the Mt. Pleasant Road, and seven miles west from 
Gold Hill. The exact date of the organization of the congrega- 
tion is not known, but, in all probability, was shortly after 1747, 
when those who organized it first came from Pennsylvania to North 
Carolina. The organization was effected in its first church build- 
ing, possibly and probably one hundred and fifty years ago, and 
no doubt was the first Lutheran congregation ever organized in 
this Piedmont section of North Carolina. At the very lowest 
estimate she is one of the very oldest congregations in all this 
section of country ; a landmark reaching away back before the 
Revolutionary War to the time of King George III., and em- 
bracing in its history from then until now many events pregnant 
with interest and importance. 

Its first house of worship was located about seven miles from 
where Organ Church now stands, near where is now St. Peter's 
Church. It was constructed of hickory logs, and hence was 
called "Hickory Church," and was erected, owned, and used 
jointly by the Lutheran and German Reformed people. Just when 
this house was built we have no positive information, nor do we 
know for how many years they occupied it. The ground upon 



120 HISTORY OF NORTH CAROLINA SYNOD. 

which it stood was never deeded to either church, and hence, 
when it became necessary to make a change, they both aban- 
doned it, and it was used no more by either. The house stood 
until it finally went to decay, the last crumbling remains being 
remembered by persons who are still living. 

The second house of worship was also a log church. It stood 
just back of the present building, and was used by the congrega- 
tion until the new house was ready for occupancy. In this 
house- Nussman, the first pastor, began his work and preached 
three years ; here Arends was ordained and preached ten years ; 
and here Storch entered upon his labors and preached until they 
moved into the new house. Then for years the building was 
used for school purposes. There are numbers of persons still 
living who went to school in the old building. 

The third and present house of worship is a stone structure, 
50 x 40, and two stories high. The old pulpit was goblet-shaped, 
with its sounding board overhead, and built high up against the 
wall, with winding steps to ascend. It has long since disap- 
peared. 

On three sides of the auditorium there is a capacious gallery 
with stairs leading up from either side, where, facing the pulpit, 
stood for many years the old pipe organ, from which the church 
derives its popular name of " The Organ Church." 

It was built in the house, entirely by hand, by a Mr. Stirewalt, 
a member of the congregation, and was one among the very 
first pipe organs ever built in America, and the first of any kind 
in any Lutheran church in North Carolina. 

It possessed none of the external beauty and symmetry of the 
pipe organs of our day and time, but it was well adapted to its 
surroundings and the object for which it was made ; and for long 
years its deep, majestic, solemn voice led the congregation in its 
service of praise, or wailed out its slow, heart-searching funeral 
dirge as the body of one after another of the people was carried 
out to the silent city of the dead. Like its builder, and the 
many who loved it and who for many years had united their 
voices with its mellow tones, it gradually yielded to the inroads 
of time and use, growing each year weaker and weaker, until at 



SKETCHES OF CONGREGATIONS. 



length its work was done. Then, for a long time, it stood there 
voiceless and shattered, a relic and reminder of by-gone days. 
It has long since been removed. 

In later years the house has been greatly modernized, im- 
proved, and beautified. Seating capacity about four hundred. 

At the east end of the church is the graveyard, surrounded by 
a massive stone wall. Here lie buried the earthly remains of 
four Lutheran ministers, viz.: Rev. C. A. G. Storch, Rev. 
Henry Graeber, Rev. Joseph A. Linn, and Rev. Daniel I. 
Dreher. 

Upon a beautiful and commanding elevation near the church 
stands the parsonage, which belongs jointly to the two congrega- 
tions constituting the pastorate, and which was built during the 
pastorship of Rev. W. R. Brown. 

It is a neat frame building, containing six rooms, and is fin- 
ished in good style and taste, and has attached all necessary out- 
buildings. Belonging to the congregation there are between 
twenty and thirty acres of land surrounding the church, and 
mostly in native forest. 

The present membership is three hundred and thirty-seven. 

Pastors. 

Rev. Adolphus Nussman 1773 — 1 774 

Rev. Gottfried Arends 1775 — 1785 

Rev. Adolphus Nussman .1785 — J 7&7 

Rev. C. A. G. Storch 1788— 1823 

Rev. Daniel Scherer 1S23 — 1829 

Rev. Henry Graeber 1S32 — 1843 

Rev. Samuel Rothrock, D. D 1S44 — 1866 

Rev. W. It. Cone 1866 (4 months) 

Rev. William Am 1866— 1868 

Revs. S. Scherer and W. H. Cone 1869 — 1870 

Rev. W. H. Cone 1870— 1873 

Rev. W. R. Ketchie 1873 — 1874 

Rev. P. A. Strobel 1874 — 1875 

Rev. S. Rothrock, D. D 1876— 1886 

Rev. W. R. Brown 1886— 1894 

Rev. George H. Cox 1894. 

The aggregate of vacancies since the first pastor in 1773 is 
only one year. 



122 HISTORY OF NORTH CAROLINA SYNOD. 

Prosperity Church is located in Cabarrus County, N. C, 
about five miles from Mount Pleasant. 

The congregation is an off-shoot from St. John's Church, and 
was organized by its pastor, Rev. R. W. Petrea, at Rimer's 
school-house, in 1879. In the beginning it was a union congre- 
gation, composed of members of the Lutheran and German Re- 
formed Churches, but before the church was completed a separa- 
tion was effected, and the congregation has ever since been 
wholly Lutheran. The house of worship is a very neat frame 
building, which was erected in 1880 and dedicated in 1882 by 
Rev. L. A. Bikle, D. D. It is 40 x 30, and has a seating 
capacity of about two hundred and seventy-five. The congrega- 
tion has always been small, and now numbers sixty-two. 

Pastors. 

Rev. R. W. Petrea 1882— 1887 

Rev. S. L. Keller 1887— 1888 

Rev. J. M. Hedrick 18S8— 1893 

Rev. B. S. Brown 1894 — 1S96 

Rev. S. D. Steffey 1896 (3 months) 

Rev. R. L. Brown 1897 — 1899 

Rev. J. H. C. Fisher 1900. 



Pilgrim Church is located in Davidson County, four miles 
northeast from Lexington. 

It is a very old congregation, having been organized early in 
the last or possibly in the latter part of the preceding century. 

The earliest record found is in the Minutes of the Synod for 
the year 1810. Then Rev. Ludwig Markert was pastor, 
Christian Meyer and Valentine Tag were Elders, and Henry 
Conrad and Peter Lapp were Deacons. It was perhaps one of 
the fourteen congregations that united to organize the North 
Carolina Synod. 

The church property has always been owned jointly by the 
Lutherans and German Reformed. 

The first house of worship was a primitive log-house, 28 x 24. 



SKETCHES OF CONGREGATIONS. 



How long that house was used we have no means of knowing ; 
but it was at length supplanted by a frame building, 45x35, 
with a gallery on two sides and one end, after the old rural 
German style. 

These houses stood very near where the present building is 
located. It is a very neat frame structure, 65 x 40, with gallery 
and vestibule, and has a seating capacity of five hundred. The 
present membership is sixty-five. Belonging to the Davidson 
pastorate, the congregation holds an interest in the parsonage 
at Tyro. 

According to the best information to be had, the following 
have served as pastors : 

Pastors. 



Rev. Paul Henkel, 
Rev. C. E. Bernhardt, 
Rev. A. Roschen, 
Rev. Ludwig Markert, 
Rev. G. Shober, 
Rev. Daniel Jenkins, 
Rev. Jacob Crim, 
Rev. J. B. Anthony, 
Rev. L. C. Groseclose, 
Rev. Benjamin Arey, 
Rev. \V. A. Julian, 



Rev. P. E. Zink, 
Rev. \V. H. Cone, 
Rev. A. D. L. Moser, 
Rev. J. D. Bowles, 
Rev. C. H. Bernheim, 
Rev. J. M. Hedrick, 
Rev. D. W. Michael, 
Rev. R. S. Patterson, 
Rev. W. Kimball, 
Rev. T. H. Strohecker, 
Rev. P. T. Wade. 



Providence Church is located in Scotch-Irish Township, 
in Rowan County, N. C. 

The congregation was organized in 187 1 by Rev. J. H. 
Fesperman, and was a colony from St. Matthew's Church in 
Davie County. Immediately after the organization steps were 
taken to erect a house of worship. This building was of logs, 
and though used for years was never completed. Later another 
building was erected on the same ground. It is a substantial 
frame structure, 45 X35, and will comfortably seat perhaps four 
hundred persons. It was dedicated on the fourth Sunday in 
April, 1897, by Rev. B. S. Brown and Rev. H. W. Jeffcoat. 
The present membership is forty-two. 



124 HISTORY OF NORTH CAROLINA SYNOD. 

Pastors. 

Rev. J. H. Fesperman 5 years. 

Rev. W. R. Ketchie 15 years. 

Rev. R. L. Bame I year. 

Rev. H. M. Brown 1 year. 

Rev. E. P. Parker 1 year. 

Rev. H. E. H. Sloop 1 year. 

Rev. W. Kimball 1 year. 

Rev. R. A. Helms, present pastor. 



Peace Church is located in Guilford County, N. C, on the 
public road leading from Gibson ville to Greensboro. 

The congregation is an off-shoot from Frieden's Church, and 
was so named because "Peace " is the English translation for 
Frieden. It was organized in 1898 by ReY. V. Y. Boozer. 

The house of worship is a frame structure, 50x35, and is neat, 
substantial, and churchly. It was erected in 189S. The present 
membership is fifty-five. 

Pastors. 

Rev. V. V. Boozer 1S98 — 1899. 

Rev. W. W. J. Ritchie 1S99. 



Richland Church is located in Randolph County, four miles 
north from Liberty. 

Emigrants from Pennsylvania settled here between the years 
1750 and 1760, and, according to the best information, organ- 
ized the congregation about the year 1791, under the leadership 
of ReY. Christian Eberhardt Bernhardt, who came to this vicinity 
in 17S9. The congregation was then composed of Lutherans 
and German Reformed, and continued thus until about the year 
1802, when it became wholly Lutheran. It is, in all probability, 
one of the congregations that participated in the organization of 
the Synod in 1803. 

The first house of worship, like all churches of that day, was 



SKETCHES OF CONGREGATIONS. I 25 

made of logs. It was about 35 x 25, had a gallery, a goblet- 
shaped pulpit, and an elevated pew built expressly for the officers 
of the congregation. 

The present house of worship is a neat frame building, 45 x 35, 
nicely finished and furnished, and having a seating capacity of 
three hundred and fifty. 

Not far from here the Rev. Jacob Scherer was born, and in this 
congregation he was catechised and confirmed, and for long years 
held his membership. 

Here, too, is the grave of the Rev. Philip Henkel, who died 
in 1833, while on a visit to this congregation. 

The congregation owns an interest in the parsonage of the pas- 
torate located near Lau's Church in the adjoining county. The 
present membership is sixy-nine. 

Pastors. 

Rev. C. E. Bernhardt, Rev. E. P. Parker, 

Rev. Ludvvig Markert, Rev. W. A. Lutz, 

Rev. Jacob Scherer, Rev. D. W. Michael, 

Rev. William Artz, Rev. W. A. Julian, 

Rev. John Swicegood, Rev. A. D. L. Moser, 

Rev. Simeon Scherer, Rev. B. W. Cronk, 

Rev. B. C. Hall, Rev. H. M. Brown. 



Reformation Church is located at the southern point of 
Davie County, N. C, eight miles north from Salisbury. 

In 1764 a colony from Germany settled ten miles north from 
the present location, and erected a church which was called 
" Heidleberg Church," and sometimes called "Dutchman's 
Creek Church. ' ' The old church book records the first baptism 
as having been administered on October 2d, 1766. This is the 
oldest positive date connected with any Lutheran Church in 
North Carolina, and the house they erected is supposed to have 
been the first church in all that section of country. The con- 
gregation seems to have lapsed, for the record is that a new 
house was erected in 18 19, about eight miles south from the first 



126 HISTORY OF NORTH CAROLINA SYNOD. 

location, and that a congregation was organized in 1823, and was 
named " New Jerusalem." 

Again the congregation lapsed, for on October 15th, 1873, 
a new congregation was organized in a school-house by Rev. 
J. D. Bowles and Rev. P. E. Zink, about one mile south from 
Jerusalem, and was named " Reformation," and sometimes called 
" Cherry Hill Church," and a new house was erected. This is 
a nicely finished frame building, 55 x 35, with a seating capacity 
for about three hundred and fifty. The present membership is 
twenty-two. 

In 187 1 the Synod appointed a committee to make sale of 
the real estate attached to the old Heidleberg Church. And in 
1872 the committee reported that they had sold it for 5300.00, 
and, in accordance with their instructions, had had a substantial 
stone wall built around the old graveyard at that place. 

The congregation has an interest in the parsonage at Tyro 
Shops. 

Pastors. 

Rev. Paul Henkel 1785 — 1789. 

Rev. G. Shober 1809. 

Rev. J. Crim 1843— 1S60. 

Rev. C. Lentz 1863— 1864. 

Rev. W. R. Ketchie 1869 — 1870. 

Rev. J. D. Bowles 1870— 1873. 

Rev. H. M. Brown 1874— 1880. 

Rev. W. A. Julian 1880— 1885. 

Rev. J. M. Hedrick 1885— 1887. 

Rev. R. L. Brown 1888— 1892. 

Rev. E. P. Parker 1893— 1894. 

Rev. H. E. H. Sloop 1896— 1897. 

Rev. W. Kimball 1897— 1898. 

Rev. P. J. Wade 1898. 



St. John's Church, located in Salisbury, Rowan County,. 
N. C. 

The date of the first organization of the congregation is not 
known, but was somewhere between 1747, when the first German 



SKETCHES OF CONGREGATIONS. 127 

Lutheran settlers came from Pennsylvania, and 1768, when a 
parcel of land lying near the little village of Salisbury, now the 
old Lutheran graveyard in the city, was deeded to, the congre- 
gation by Mr. John Louis Beard for the purpose of a graveyard ; 
and upon which it was proposed to erect a house of worship. 
In accordance with the usual custom at that time, the house 
was built of logs, and was the first church of any kind ever 
erected in Salisbury. 

It was wholly Lutheran ; that is, no one else had any right or 
title in it ; and it was the only one of the three mother-churches, 
as well as many others in after years, that was owned entirely 
by the Lutherans. According to the terms of the deed of the 
land, the Church of England and the Calvinistic Churches were 
permitted to hold service in the house when it was not being 
used by the Lutherans, but they had no ownership in the prop- 
erty and no union with the congregation. 

The second house of worship, a frame structure, was erected in 
18 18. The Lutheran congregation seems to have lapsed, and 
the Episcopalians to have continued to hold service in the old 
house until it became dilapidated. Then they erected a new 
house on the same ground ; they bearing nearly all the expense, 
though assisted by the Lutherans. When the question of dedi- 
cation arose, there came with it a dispute as to ownership. Un- 
doubtedly the Lutherans owned the land, but the Episcopalians 
claimed the house. And finally, as the best way out of the 
difficulty, the Lutherans purchased from the Episcopalians all 
their interest in the house. 

The third house of worship was built of brick, and cost 
$2500.00. The work was begun in 1848, during the pastorate 
of Rev. J. H. Coffman, but was not completed until 1S57, while 
Rev. L. C. Groseclose was pastor. It was dedicated May 26th, 
1857, the sermon being preached by Rev. D. F. Bittle, D. D., 
who was then the President of Roanoke College. 

The fourth house of worship is a fine brick structure. The 
corner-stone was laid December 9th, 18S3, while the Rev. W. 
J. Smith was pastor, and was dedicated the third Sunday in 
May, 1889, by the pastor, Rev. C. B. King, the Rev. Dr. W. S. 



128 HISTORY OF NORTH CAROLINA SYNOD. 

Bowman preaching the sermon. During the pastorship of Rev. 
Dr. L. E. Busby the church has been greatly improved and beau- 
tified. In 1899 an addition for Sunday school purposes was 
made at a cost of about $4000.00, and during 1901 the main 
auditorium was remodeled and beautified at a cost of about 
$2000.00. 

The congregation also owns a neat parsonage standing upon 
an adjoining lot to the church. 

Although history does not so state, yet there are good reasons 
for believing that this congregation united with Organ and St. 
John's of Cabarrus County in sending commissioners to Germany 
in the search of a preacher and school teacher in 1772 ; for im- 
mediately upon their return, in 1773, the preacher became the 
pastor of all three churches, and settled in Salisbury. 

This congregation is celebrated for some important events 
that have occurred. Here the Evangelical Lutheran Synod and 
Ministerium of North Carolina, the Mother Synod in the South, 
and the third Synod in the United States, was organized in May, 
1803, and here, in 1884, the Diet was held that projected the 
formation of the United Synod in the South. 

The congregation has had many trials and difficulties, lapsing 
at one time for more than twenty years. Now, however, it is in 
a flourishing condition, holding property valued at $20,000.00, 
and having three hundred and seventy-two confirmed members, 
with more than three hundred in the Sunday school. 

The pastoral changes have been many and frequent. The 
following is the list, as nearly accurate as can be ascertained : 

Pastors. 

Rev. Adolph Nussman 1773 — 1774. 

Rev. J. G. Arends 1775 — 1785. 

Rev. C. A. G. Storch 178S. 

Rev. John Reck 1831. 

Rev. D. P. Rosenmiller 183 1 — 1832. 

Rev. John T. Tabler 1832— 1833. 

Rev. S. Rothrock, D. D 1833—1835. 

Rev. E. A. Bolles 1835— 1836. 

Rev. S. Rothrock, D. D 1836— 1839. 

Rev. John D. Sheck 1840 — 1844. 




"N 



J' 



SKETCHES OF CONGREGATIONS. 



129 



Pastors. 

Rev. S. Rothrock, D. D 1S44. 

Rev. J. B. Anthony 1S44 — -1846 

Rev. J. H. Coffman 1848—1852 

Rev. Simeon Scherer 1852 — 1855 

Rev. L. C. Groseclose 1856 — 1S65 

Rev. N. Aldrich 1S65— 1S67 

Rev. Simeon Scherer) . . ,, .o£» ,c>. 

> jointly 1867 — 1872 

Rev. W. H. Cone J 

Rev. J. G. Neiffer 1S72— 1S76 

Rev. T. W. Dosh, D. D 1876— 1S77 

Rev. W. J. Smith 1S7S — 1S83 

Rev. William Stoudenmire 1 884 — 1886 

Rev. C. B. King 1S86— 1S96 

Rev. L. E. Busby, D. D 1896. 



St. John's Church, located in Cabarrus County, N. C, 
six miles east from Concord and three miles west from Mt. 
Pleasant. The exact date of the organization of the congrega- 
tion is not known, but it was, no doubt, shortly after the arrival 
of the first German emigrants from Pennsylvania, in 1747. 

Its first house of worship was located near Buffalo Creek, about 
one and one half miles north from Mt. Pleasant and about three 
miles east from the present church. It was a rude log-hut, built of 
unhewn pine logs, and was without floor, windows, or chimney. 
Here was also its first graveyard, the marks of graves being still 
visible. The house was built and owned jointly by the Lutherans 
and German Reformed. 

In 1894, during the pastorship of Rev. J. Q. Wertz, a beauti- 
ful monument was erected to mark the spot, an address being 
delivered by Rev. George H. Cox. 

The second house of worship was located about one-half mile 
from the present location, on the land now belonging to Mr. 
Archie Cline. This was also a log-house and owned jointly. 
Here was the second graveyard, several graves being yet dis- 
tinctly visible. We do not know when this house was erected, 
nor how long it was used, but at length, in 1771, a peaceable 



130 HISTORY OF NORTH CAROLINA SYNOD. 

separation from the German Reformed was agreed upon, this 
being the first positive date preserved in the history of the con- 
gregation. Up to that time it had been known as "Dutch Buf- 
falo Creek Church," but from then until now as "St. John's 
Church," though the old name continued to cling to it for many 
years. 

The third house of worship was located in the midst of what 
is now the St. John's graveyard. The house was built chiefly 
at the expense of one member, Captain John Paul Barringer, 
and, as a mark of appreciation, the congregation had a large, 
elevated, and enclosed pew constructed for the exclusive use of 
him and his family. 

The fourth house of worship was built upon the site of the 
third, it having been removed. This was a frame building and 
was larger and better than any that had preceded it. It was 
begun in 1784 and was dedicated July 4th, 1785. Being painted 
red, it came to be called and was known, as long as it stood, as 
"The Old Red Meeting-house." • 

The fifth (present) house of worship is a substantial brick struc- 
ture, 80 x 55. Originally it had a gallery and side doors, after 
the style of the times. It was erected in 1845 an d dedicated 
August 2 2d, 1846, and was used without material change for 
about forty-three years. Then, in 1888, the interior was com- 
pletely remodeled, making it a modern church, with vestibule, 
library, infant class-room, and council-room, and having a seat- 
ing capacity of six hundred. It was rededicated February 10th, 
1889, the service and sermon being delivered by the pastor, 
Rev. S. L. Keller. 

Near the church stands the parsonage. It is a neat frame 
building, two stories high, containing seven rooms, nicely fin- 
ished and partly furnished, having all necessary conveniences 
and comforts. A separate building stands close by, erected for 
the pastor's study. 

From the beginning the congregation has followed the true 
Lutheran custom of having the school-house alongside of the 
church. At first one house served for both church and school- 
house. Then, as far back as the time of the first pastor, Rev. 



SKETCHES OF CONGREGATIONS. I3I 

A. Nussman, a separate house was built, in which the teacher 
both lived and taught. 

October 2 2d, 1782, Jacob Fegert, Marx Haus, and Jacob 
Thieme, three members of the congregation, entered one hun- 
dred acres of government land, in trust, for the congregation. 
The same being that on which the church property now stands. 
It is very valuable now and is a source of considerable income 
to the congregation. The congregation is one of the largest in 
the Synod, numbering at the present three hundred and eight 
members. 

Although it is one of the three mother-churches of the Synod 
and has the honor of having entertained the first ecclesiastical 
meeting ever held by Lutherans in North Carolina, it did not 
participate in the organization of the North Carolina Synod, nor 
become an integral part thereof until its Fourth Annual Conven- 
tion, in 1806. Since then it has taken an active part in all the 
work of the Synod, many important events having had either 
birth or culmination in its house. 

General Barringer, of Revolutionary fame, as well as many 
other men prominent in the affairs of church, county, and State, 
have been reared spiritually in old St. John's. The graveyard 
is one of the largest in all the surrounding country, containing 
about four acres, and nearly or quite four thousand graves. 
Here lie buried the remains of three Lutheran ministers, Rev. 
Adolphus Nussman, Rev. Jacob W. Barrier, and Rev. William 
Artz. 

Pastors. 

Rev. Adolphus Nussman J 774 — r 794- 

Rev C. A. G. Storch J 796 — 1797 

Rev. Adam N. Markerd 1797 — 1800 

Rev. C. A. G. Storch 1800 — 1821 

Rev. Daniel Scherer 1821 — 183 1 

Rev. Henry Graeber !&32 — 1843 

Rev. John D. Scheck 1844 — 1857 

Rev. G. D. Bernheim, D. D 1858— 1860 

Rev. J. B. Anthony i860 — 1867 

Rev. L. C. Groseclose 1867 — 1872 

Rev. D. M. Henkel, D. I) 1872— -1875 

Rev. R. W. Petrea 1876— 1S87 



I32 HISTORY OF NORTH CAROLINA SYNOD. 

Pastors. 

Rev. S. L. Keller 1887— 1890. 

Rev. Peter Miller 1890 — 1893. 

Rev. J. Q. Wertz 1894— 1896. 

Rev. S. D. Steffey 1896. 

The aggregate of vacancies since 1774, when the congregation 
secured its first pastor, is about six years. 



St. Paul's Church, Rowan County, N. C, is located five 
miles south from Salisbury. It was originally known as " Hols- 
houser's Church," so named because the land was given by 
Andrew Holshouser, near where was the Holshouser Mill, now 
known as the Heilig Mill. Mr. Holshouser was a member of the 
German Reformed Church, and the congregation was a union 
congregation. It was organized about the year 1835. T ne ^ rs ^ 
mention of it is in the Minutes of the Synod of 1S37. In 1866 
it became wholly Lutheran, the German Reformed establishing 
what is now known as " Mt. Hope Church." 

The present house of worship, which is the second building, 
is a fine large brick structure. It was dedicated July 21st, 1872, 
by Rev. W. Kimball, who was then pastor. During the pas- 
torate of Rev. C. A. Rose the house was enlarged and re- 
modeled at a cost of $1600.00, and is now one of the most 
complete and handsome country churches in the Synod. It was 
rededicated April 29th, 1894, Rev. George H. Cox, D.D., preach- 
ing the sermon. The seating capacity is about four hundred and 
fifty. Number of members two hundred and eighty-five. 

The congregation has an interest in the parsonage at Zeb, four 
miles northwest from Salisbury, near Bethel Church, with which 
it is in pastoral relation. 

Pastors. 

Rev. S. Rothrock, D. D 1S35— 1843. 

Rev. Benjamin Arey 1843 — 1845. 

Rev. J. A. Linn, Sr 1845 — 1855. 

Rev. B. C. Hall 1S55 — 1859. 



SKETCHES OF CONGREGATIONS. 



133 



Pastors. 

Rev. J. L. Smithdeal 1S59— 1860 

Rev. W. Kimball 1861— 1876 

Rev. W. H. Cone 1878— 1880 

Rev. B. S. Brown 1881— 1882 

Rev. V. R. Stickley 1882—18" 

Rev. C. A. Rose 1884—18 

Rev. V. Y. Boozer 1899. 

Five ministers have come from this congregation, viz.: Revs. 
J. H. Fesperman, C. L. T. Fisher, J. H. C. Fisher, C. A. 
Brown, and W. W. J. Ritchie. 



St. Paul's Church, Iredell County, N. C, is located three 
miles east from Statesville. 

The congregation was organized by Rev. Benjamin Arey, 
and was admitted to Synod in 1840. 

The first house of worship was erected about one mile from 
the present location. It was a frame building, 60 x 40, and was 
used until 1885, when the present house was erected. It is a 
neat frame building, after the modern style of architecture, about 
60 x 30, and having a seating capacity of three hundred. It was 
dedicated in 1886 by Rev. H. M. Brown. The present mem- 
bership is thirty. 

In the graveyard is the grave of Rev. Caleb Lentz. 

Pastois. 

Rev. Benjamin Arey 1840 — 1846 

Rev. W. H. Fink 1S46— 1847 

Rev. J. B. Anthony 1847 — J ^49 

Rev. B. N. Hopkins 1849 — 1852 

Rev. W. G. Harter 1852. 

Rev. S. Scherer 1S52 — 1855 

Rev. John Swicegood 1S55 — 1856 

Rev. Paul Kistler 1856 — 1857 

Rev. W. Gearhardt, D. D 1857— 1859 

Rev. J. A. Linn, Sr 1859 — 1860 

Rev. G. Stingly 1S60 — 1861 

Rev. J. L. Smithdeal 1863— 1865 



134 HISTORY OF NORTH CAROLINA SYNOD. 

Pastors. 

Rev. Paul Kistler 1870. 

Rev. J. H. Fesperman 1871 — 1874 

Rev. W. R. Ketchie 1875 — 1879 

Rev. J. B. Anthony 1880— 1882 

Rev. H. M. Brown 18S2— 1887 

Rev. W. Kimball 1888— 1889 

Rev. T. H. Strohecker 1889 — 1890 

Rev. D. W. Michael 1891 — 1894 

Rev. G. S. Diven 1895— 1896 

Rev. B. S. Brown 1896 — 1899 

Rev. R. A. Helms 1899. 

The aggregate of vacancies is six years. 



St. Paul's Church, corner of Sixth and Market Streets, 
Wilmington, N. C, was organized by a committee appointed by 
the North Carolina Synod, consisting of Rev. J. A. Linn, Sr., 
and Rev. G. D. Bernheim, D. D., in the old Presbyterian 
Church that used to stand on Front Street, on May 31st, 1858. 

There were fifty-eight members, of whom the following were 
elected as the first council : 

Trustees — J. G. Bauman, H. B. Eilers, H. Von Glahn, E. 
Schulken, and H. Vollers. 

Elders — N. Bremer and A. Adrian. 

Deaeons — W. Knohl and H. Rehder. 

The congregation rented the "Session House M of the Protestant 
Episcopal Church, where they worshiped until they were prepared 
to go into their own property. On February 15th, 1859, the 
lot upon which the church now stands was purchased, and the 
corner-stone was laid September 6th of the same year. In i860 
the church was under roof, and in 1861 the lecture-room was so 
far completed as to enable them to hold divine service and Sun- 
day school there. By this time the war between the States was 
raging, and, in consequence, all work on the church was sus- 
pended. When the city fell into the hands of the United States 
troops they took possession of the church and destroyed or 



SKETCHES OF CONGREGATIONS. 1 35 

mutilated everything, leaving nothing but bare walls and the 
roof, thus entailing upon the congregation increased expense 
and labor, so that the church was not completed until 1869, and 
dedicated, August 22d, 1870, by Rev. G. D. Bernheim, U. D., 
Rev. C. H. Bernheim, Rev. L. Muller, and Rev. W. A. Julian. 

The house is a stucco-covered brick structure, 90 x 45 feet, 
with a steeple 125 feet high, inside and outside most beautifully 
finished, and has a seating capacity of four hundred. 

The congregation has a large and commodious parsonage on a 
lot adjoining the church lot. It is a two-story frame building, 
with all modern conveniences. They also own what is called 
the "Luther Memorial" building, for Sunday and parochial 
schools. It was first erected in 1883, and opened for use in 
1884. January 12th, 1894, it was destroyed by fire, but was im- 
mediately replaced by a more elegant building, the corner-stone 
being laid July 18th, and the house dedicated, September 30th, 
1894. In this building the congregation maintains a regular 
parochial school, the only one in the North Carolina Synod. 

The congregation numbers three hundred and fifty members. 

Pastors. 

Rev. J. H. Mengert 1859 — 1862. 

Rev. G. D. Bernheim, D. D 1870— 1882. 

Rev. F. W. E. Peschau, D. D 1882— 1893. 

Rev. Karl Boldt 1893 — 1897. 

Rev. A. G. Voigt, D. D 1898. 

The aggregate of vacancies during the existence of the congre- 
gation has been nine years lacking one month. 



St. Paul's Church in the city of Asheville is a mission 
congregation, under the control of the Board of Missions of the 
United Synod in the South, but connected with the North Caro- 
lina Synod. 



I36 HISTORY OF NORTH CAROLINA SYNOD. 

The organization was effected September nth, 1892, by Rev. 
F. W. E. Peschau, D. D. , with twenty-five names enrolled. There 
are now about forty members. They have no church buildings 
but worship in a rented hall. The mission has been served by 



Rev. F. W. E. Peschau, D. D 1892— 1894. 

Rev. L. E. Busby 1894 — 1896. 

Rev. C. B. King 1896— 1S97. 

Rev. C. B. Cox 1898 — 1900. 



St. Paul's Church, Alamance County, N. C, is located 
six miles from Burlington, on the old Salisbury and Hillsboro 
Road. 

The congregation was for many years known as "Graves- 
Church." It was organized about the year 1795, probably by 
Rev. C. E. Bernhardt, and was composed of Lutherans and Ger- 
man Reformed, but in a few years, about 1801, it became wholly 
Lutheran, and no doubt was one of the congregations that par- 
ticipated in the organization of the Synod in 1803. 

Two buildings have preceded the present house of worship,, 
which is a neat frame edifice, 40 X35. It was erected in 1893, 
and comfortably seats about three hundred persons. The present 
membership is sixty. 

The congregation owns one-half of the parsonage at Gibson- 
ville, it having formerly been connected in a pastorate with old 
Frieden's Church. It is now, however, a part of the Guil- 
ford pastorate. 

Pastors. 

Rev. C. E. Bernhardt, Rev. S. Rothrock, 

Rev. Philip Ilenkel, Rev. C. H. Bernheim, 

Rev. Ludwig Markert, Rev. W. Kimball, 

Rev. Jacob Scherer, Rev. E. P. Parker, 

Rev. William Artz, Rev. C. B. Miller, 

Rev. John D. Sheck, Rev. H. M. Brown. 



SKETCHES OF CONGREGATIONS. 1 37 

St. Peter's (Krauth Memorial) Evangelical Lutheran 
Church is located in Rowan County, N. C, about two miles 
from Rockwell, on the Yadkin Railroad. 

The exact date of the first organization is not known, but it 
was probably between 1825 and 1830. The congregation be- 
longed exclusively to the Tennessee Synod. 

During the year 1855, Rev. J. A. Linn, Sr., and Rev. S. Roth- 
rock, D. D. , held services with the congregation, which resulted 
in the organization of a congregation in sympathy with the 
North Carolina Synod, to which one-half the property was 
ceded. 

In 1858 this congregation was received as an integral part of 
the North Carolina Synod, Rev. S. Rothrock being the pastor. 

The first house of worship was a frame building, about 40 x 30, 
with the old-fashioned gallery, pulpit, etc. 

While under the pastorship of Rev. T. H. Strohecker, April 
7th, 1883, the corner-stone of the new church was laid and the 
house was dedicated, June 29th, 1884, Rev. J. B. Davis, D. D. , 
preaching the sermon, and the members of the Conference, there 
in session, participating in the services. It is a neat frame build- 
ing, 60x40, in gothic style, and neatly finished inside and out. 
Its seating capacity is about three hundred. 

The congregation is now all one, belonging to the North 
Carolina Synod, but when the change took place is not definitely 
known. Rev. J. A. Linn, Sr. , Rev. J. A. Linn, Jr., Rev. H. 
A. Trexler, and Hon. L. H. Rothrock are children of this con- 
gregation. The present membership is two hundred and forty- 
six. 

Pastors. 

Rev. S. Rothrock, D. D 1S55 — 1S6S 

Rev. S. Scherer 1S68 — 1870 

Rev. W. H. Cone 1871 — 1877 

Rev. J. A. Linn, Jr 1877— 18S0 

Rev. T. H. Strohecker 1881— 18S5 

Rev. H. A. Trexler 18S6— 1892 

Rev. W. P. Huddle 1893— 1897 

Rev. W. B. Oney 1S97 — 189S 

Rev. E. W. Leslie 1899. 



I30 HISTORY OF NORTH CAROLINA SYNOD. 

St. Matthew's Church, of Rowan County, is located 
eleven miles east from Salisbury, on the Bringle Ferry Road. 
In the year 1838 twenty young persons from the neighborhood 
went to Organ Church to be catechised and confirmed by Rev. 
Henry Graeber, and then were organized into a congregation 
by the Rev. Benjamin Arey. John Hartman, Jacob File, An- 
drew Frick, and Peter Klutz constituted the first council. The 
congregation worshiped in barns and private dwelling-houses for 
a number of years, until the first house of worship was erected. 
It was a frame building, nearly square, with gallery on three 
sides, and stood near the present building, in what is now the 
graveyard. 

The first child baptized in the congregation was Michael 
Bame, son of Samuel and Anna Bame. The baptism was ad- 
ministered by Rev. Benjamin Arey, in a barn, on April 16th, 
1838. 

The present church house was erected in 1882, and dedicated 
in 1884 by Rev. J. B. Davis, D. D., and Rev. V. R. Stickley. 
It is a neat frame building, 60 x 40, with vestibule, gallery, two 
council-rooms, tower and bell, and niche in rear of the pulpit. 

The parsonage is located two miles from the church, on the 
Bringle Ferry Road. It is a two-story frame building, contain- 
ing seven rooms, and nicely finished, and was erected in 1889. 
The congregation numbers three hundred and six members. 

Pastors. 

Rev. Benjamin Arey, Rev. J. A. Linn, Jr., 

Rev. J. D. Sheck, Rev. R. L. Brown, 

Rev. William Artz, Rev. T. H. Strohecker, 

Rev. S. Rothrock, D. D., Rev. H. A. Trexler, 

Rev. J. A. Linn, Sr., Rev. W. P. Huddle, 

Rev. W. Kimball, Rev. W. B. Oney, 

Rev. L. C. Groseclose, Rev. E. W. Leslie. 
Rev. W. H. Cone, 



St. Matthew's Church, Wilmington, N. C, is located in 
that part of the city called Brooklyn, N. Fourth Street, above Bla- 
den. In the year 1890 some of the members of St. Paul's Evan- 



SKETCHES OF CONGREGATIONS. 1 39 

gelical Lutheran Church, realizing the necessity for another 
Lutheran Church in Wilmington, took the first step toward the 
desired end by the organization of a Sunday school, in a rented 
hall, on Fourth Street. The school grew so rapidly as to very 
soon demand larger and more suitable quarters. A lot was pur- 
chased and the work of building begun in 1891. In the follow- 
ing year, 1892, ten members of St. Paul's, having secured letters 
of honorable dismission for the purpose, on March 21st, organ- 
ized the congregation. The building was soon completed. It 
is a beautiful chapel, in gothic style, 55 x 30, with a spire 70 
feet high. All is nicely finished and in churchly order. 

The congregation also owns an excellent school-building, ad- 
joining the church. It was originally intended for a parochial 
school, but is now rented to the City School Board for the use 
of the public school. 

On July 28th, 1895, the pastor of St. Matthew's, by instruc- 
tions from Synod, organized a congregation in New Bern. Since 
then the few members who were there have united with St. 
Matthew's. 

The pastor of St. Paul's, Rev. F. W. E. Peschau, D. D., served 
the congregation from the beginning until April 27th, 1892, 
when Rev. G. D. Bernheim, I). D., became pastor, and served 
until October 15th, 1899, when, on accaunt of the infirmities of 
age, he tendered his resignation. On November 5th, 1899, the 
congregation accepted the resignation and made the Doctor pas- 
tor emeritus. He supplied the church until July 1901, when 
the Rev. C. W. Kegley became the pastor, and was installed 
the following 25th of August by the President of Synod and 
the Rev. R. C. Holland, D. D. 



St. Matthew's Church, Davie County, N. C, was organ- 
ized by Rev. Benjamin Arey in 1847. 

The church building is of logs, 50 x 36, and was erected in 
1850, and dedicated by Rev. H. M. Brown in 1882. During 



140 HISTORY OK NORTH CAROLINA SYNOD. 

the pastorship of Rev. R. L. Brown the house was remodeled 
and enlarged, Rev. Brown presenting the bell. It will seat 
comfortably about three hundred. The present membership is 
forty. 

Pastors. 

Rev. Benjamin Arey 1840 — 1845 

Rev. J. Crim 1S45 — 1861 

Rev. W. Kimball 1S61— 1866 

Rev. W. R. Ketchie 1866—1882 

Rev. H. M. Brown 1882—1886 

Rev. R. L. Brown 1888— 1892 

Rev. E. P. Parker 1892— 1S93 

Rev. H. E. H. Sloop 1894— 1S96 

Rev. W. Kimball 1896— 1S98 

Rev. B. S. Brown 1898—18 

Rev. R. A. Helms ^99- 



St. Enoch's Church is located in the town of Enochville, 
Rowan County, N. C. The congregation is an off-shoot from 
Lutheran Chapel Church, and was organized at Mr. Philip Over- 
cash's residence, in August, 1835, by Rev. P. A. Strobel. 

The first house of worship was a frame building, erected 
shortly after the congregation was organized, at a cost of 
$1500.00. It was dedicated the second Sunday in September, 
1839, by Revs. W. Artz, S. Rothrock, and P. A. Strobel. 

The present building is a fine brick structure, 70 x 50, beauti- 
ful and churchly in all its appointments. It was erected in 
1873, at a cost of $7000.00. It is calculated to comfortably 
seat seven hundred persons. The dedication services were held 
September 20th, 1874. The present number of members is two 
hundred and ninety-four. 

This congregation has produced numbers of prominent per- 
sons, among whom are Mr. W. T. H. Plaster, a teacher of three 
generations ; Rev. J. W. Rumple, Rev. T. J. Yost, Revs. W. A. 
and J. L. Deaton, and Rev. B. S. Brown. 



SKETCHES OF CONGREGATIONS. 141 

An excellent parsonage stands near the church, containing 
eight rooms ; a two-room study. All necessary outbuildings, 
an orchard, garden, and two or three acres of land. All of 
which is in good condition and belongs to the pastorate, consist- 
ing of St. Enoch's and Trinity Churches. 

Pastors. 

Rev. P. A. Strobel 1837— 1841. 

Rev. W. G. Harter 1841 — 1849. 

Rev. J. H. Coffman 1849 — 1850. 

Rev. B. N. Hopkins 1850 — 1852. 

Rev. J. S. Heilig 1852— 1866. 

Rev. J. W. Barrier 1866— 1867. 

Rev. A. D. L. Moser 1S6S— 1873. 

Rev. W. A. Julian 1874 — 1879. 

Rev. W. A. Lutz 1SS0— 1891. 

Rev. V. R. Stickley 1892. 

The longest vacancy in sixty-five years was seven months. 
To this congregation belongs the honor of inaugurating the 
" Church Extension Fund " of the North Carolina Synod, which 
was done by contributing $75.00 in cash at its semi-centennial 
exercises, in August, 1887. 



St. Stephen's Church is located in Cabarrus County, N. 
C, two and a half miles from Cold Hill, on the Concord Road. 

Early in 1837, John Peck, John Lentz, Solomon Nussman, 
Peter Troutman, Henry I. Barringer, and George Culp held a 
meeting in the school-house and decided to build a church in 
the neighborhood. The congregation was organized on Christ- 
mas Day, 1837, at the home of Mr. John Peck, with thirty-two 
members. Four of these were German Reformed, and the rest 
were Lutherans. The first officers were : Elders, John Lentz, 
Lutheran, and John Peck, German Reformed ; Deacons, Solo- 
mon Nussman, Lutheran, and Charles Barrier, German Reformed. 

One month later, i. <?., January 30th, 1838, a congregational 
meeting was held, when Elder John Peck resigned and Henry 
Lentz, a Lutheran, was elected in his place, and there never was 



142 



HISTORY OF NORTH CAROLINA SYNOD. 



another German Reformed officer elected by the congregation, 
so that in reality St. Stephen's has always been wholly Lutheran. 

The first house of worship was begun before the congregation 
was organized, and finished shortly after. This has been re- 
placed by a more modern building, which was erected in 1880 
and dedicated June 10th, 1883, under the pastorship of Rev. 
W. Kimball. It is a neat frame building, 60 x 40, with gallery 
in one end, and has a seating capacity of four hundred. The 
present membership is one hundred and thirty-seven. 

In the year 1897 St. Stephen's and Mt. Olive's erected a 
roomy and comfortable parsonage, near St. Stephen's Church, 
together with all necessary outbuildings. 



Pastors, 

Rev. P. A. Strobel 1837 — 

Rev. S. Rothrock, D. D 1S43 — 

Rev. J. A. Linn, Sr 1855 — 

Rev. L. C. Groseclose 1S64 — 

Rev. R. L. Brown 1866— 

Rev. W. R. Ketchie 1873 — 

Rev. P. A. Strobel 1874 — 

Rev. S. Rothrock, D. D 1876— 

Rev. W. Kimball 1880— 

Rev. A. D. L. Moser 1885— 

Rev. George H. Cox 18S8 — 

Rev. J. M. Lingle 1894 — 

Rev. P. H. E. Derrick 1895 — 

Rev. G. A. Riser 1898 — 

Rev. W. A. Dutton 1900. 



843 
854 
863 
866 
873 
874 
875 
879 
S83 
887 
894 

895 
897 
S99 



St. Mark's Church is located in the town of China Grove, 
Rowan County, N. C. 

It was organized in 1894, by Rev. C. A. Marks, and was com- 
posed of members of the Lutheran Chapel Church, then living 
in the town. 

Their beautiful house of worship was erected in the same 
year. By the year 1896 the congregation had grown so as to 




ST. MARK'S EVANGELICAL LUTHERAN CHURCH AND PARSONAGE, CHARLOTTE, N. C. 



SKETCHES OF CONGREGATIONS. 1 43 

necessitate the enlargement of the house. It is an excellent 
building, and both beautiful and churchly in all its appoint- 
ments. 

The present membership is one hundred and sixty. 

Pastors 

Rev. C. A. Marks , 1894— 1896. 

Rev. J. Q. Wertz 1896. 



St. Mark's Church, Charlotte, N. C, is located on North 
Tryon Street of that city. 

The congregation was organized in January, 1859, by Rev. G. 
D. Bernheim, D. D. It had a severe struggle for existence for 
several years, being weak in numbers. Gradually, however, it 
grew and prospered, being assisted financially by Synod, until 
during the pastorship of Rev. T. S. Brown, when it became self- 
sustaining. 

The first house of worship was a neat frame building at the 
corner of College and Seventh Streets, and was purchased from 
the Methodist Episcopal Church South. 

The second was also a frame structure on North Tryon Street, 
one block from the present location. 

The present building is of brick. It was erected in 1885, and 
was dedicated, November 3d, 1885, by Rev. T. S. Brown, Rev. 
W. S. Bowman, D. D., and Rev. E. A. Wingard, D. D. It has 
a seating capacity for four hundred, and a Sunday school room 
on the lower floor. It is elegantly furnished and finished, and 
is the most beautiful church in the North Carolina Synod. To 
Rev. T. S. Brown, Prof. W. A. Barrier, and Messrs. Jacob 
Duls, S. E. Linton, T. L. Seigle, and H. L. Klueppelberg the 
credit of its erection and completion belongs. Present member- 
ship one hundred and seventy-five. 

The congregation also owns an elegant parsonage. The first 
house for the pastor was located at the corner of Tenth and Pine 
Streets. It was built in 1893, and was sold in 1899. 



144 HISTORY OF NORTH CAROLINA SYNOD. 

Then a new one was built on the church lot, 408 North Tryon 
Street, at a cost of $3000.00. It is a three-story frame build- 
ing, containing eight rooms, with all modern conveniences, and 
is probably the best parsonage in the Lutheran Church in either 
of the Carolinas. 

Rev. C. L. Brown, missionary in Japan, was baptized in this 

church in 1876, and Prof. W. A. Barrier, who remembered the 

United Synod's Theological Seminary in his will, was an active 

member. 

Pastors. 

Rev. A. Phillipi 1859— 1860. 

Rev G. D. Bernheim, D. D 1S61 — 1865. 

Rev. N. Aldrich 1865— 1874. 

Rev. E. A. Wingard, D. D 1876— 1S82. 

Rev. T. H. Strohecker 1882. 

Rev. T. S. Brown 18S2 — 1891. 

Rev. W. S. Bowman, D. D 1S91 — 1897. 

Rev. C. B. King. 1S97— 1898. 

Rev. R. C. Holland, D. D. . . 1898. 



St. Michael's Church is located in the town of Troutman, 
in Iredell County, N. C, on the A. T. and O. R. R., about 
six miles from Statesville. 

The congregation was organized in 18 15, by Rev. R. J. 
Miller, and was admitted to Synod in October of the same year, 
under the name of " New Pearth. " The organization was ef- 
fected in "Cambridge Associate Presbyterian Church," about two 
miles south from the present location, where the first communion 
was had on August 27th, 1S15. The congregation continued to 
worship there until about the year 1823, when a Air. Daniel 
Walcher donated land for a church site about one and one- 
quarter miles southwest from where Troutman' s now is. The 
land was given to the Lutherans and Episcopalians jointly, and 
upon it they erected a union house of worship, made of logs, 
about 36 x 25. For several years both denominations worshiped 
in this house, then the Episcopalians voluntarily withdrew and 



SKETCHES OF CONGREGATIONS. 1 45 

erected a church of their own a few miles distant. The date of 
this movement is not known, but persons who have been reared 
in the neighborhood, and who are now fifty years old, have 
never heard an Episcopal clergyman preach there. 

About the year 1850 the house was considerably enlarged 
and improved, and the congregation continued to worship in it 
until it had erected the present building. The corner-stone was 
laid August 19th, 1886, and the dedicatory services were held 
August 14th, 1892, by the pastor, Rev. D. W. Michael, assisted 
by Rev. Prof. J. D. Shirey, D. D. It is a handsome frame 
building, 60 x 36, with recess, council-rooms, etc. 

A comfortable and convenient parsonage belongs to the con- 
gregation. It is a two-story, eight-room, frame building, with 
usual conveniences, located in the town near the church. 

Rev. Simeon W. Harkey, D. D., and his brothers were born 
and reared in this congregation. 

The congregation, in the past, has been very strong; the 
present membership is two hundred and twelve. 

Pastors. 

Rev. R. J. Miller 1815 — 1821. 

Rev. John Reck 1825 — 1S30. 

Rev. J. T. Tabler 1832. 

Rev. Benjamin Arey 1837 — 1853. 

Rev. Paul Kistler 1856—1858. 

Rev. James D. Stingley i860 — 1862. 

Rev. G. D. Bernheim, D. D 1862— 1865. 

Rev. W. Kimball 1868— 1870. 

Rev. J. H. Fesperman 1871 — 1877. 

Rev. J. B. Anthony 1878 — 1880. 

Rev. H. M. Brown 1882— 1887. 

Rev. W. Kimball 1888. 

Rev. T. H. Strohecker 18S9— 1S91. 

Rev. D. W. Michael 1891 — 1894. 

Rev. George S. Diven 1895. 

Rev. B. S. Brown 1896 — 1899. 

Rev. R. A. Helms 1899 — 1900. 

A remarkable thing in this congregation is that during its 
existence, eighty-eight years, its aggregate of vacancies has been 
nineteen years. 



146 HISTORY OF NORTH CAROLINA SYNOD. 

St. James' Church is located in the town of Concord, 

Cabarrus County, N. C. The original members were nearly all 
from Coldwater congregation. The exact date of the organiza- 
tion is not known, but was, probably, about 1841 or 1842, and 
was effected by Rev. W. G. Harter, who was the first pastor. 

The first house of worship was built on what is now called 
Mt. Pleasant Street. It was a large frame building, well fin- 
ished, and was dedicated April 6th, 1843, tne sermon being de- 
livered by Rev. Henry Graeber. The building still stands and 
is used by the town for a high school. 

The second and present house of worship is a large brick 
structure, standing at the corner of Union and Corbin Streets. 
It was erected in 1882, and was dedicated May 10th, 1891, by 
the pastor, Rev. W. G. Campbell, assisted by Rev. S. T. Hall- 
man, D. D., Rev. J. M. Hedrick preaching the sermon. It is 
modern in all its appointments, having a corner tower 112 feet 
high, a lecture-room and an infant class-room in the basement, 
and a pipe-organ in the auditorium. Its seating capacity is 
something over five hundred. 

The congregation also owns an excellent parsonage, standing 
on an adjoining lot to the church, on Corbin Street. It is a sub- 
stantial brick building, containing seven rooms and all modern 
conveniences. The present membership is two hundred and 
ninety-five. 

Pastors. 

Rev. W. G. Harter 1842— 1853 

Rev. D. I. Dreher 1S54— 1869 

Rev. C. H. Bernheim 1872— 1873 

Rev. W. W. Bowers 1874 (died in office) 

Rev. J. H. Harry 1874—1875 

Rev. L. A. Bikle, D. D 1S76— 18S0 

Rev. S. T. Hallman, D. D 1880— 18S3 

Rev. W. G. Campbell 18S6— 1893 

Rev. M. G. G. Scherer 1893— 1896 

Rev. C. B. Miller 1896— 1901 

Rev. W. H. Hiller 1902. 

The aggregate of vacancies is about three years. 




ST. JAMES' EVANGELICAL LUTHERAN CHURCH, CONCORD, N. C. 



SKETCHES OF CONGREGATIONS. l^J. 

St. Andrew's Church is located at the corner of West 
Depot and Valley Streets, Concord, N. C. It was a colony of 
Lutherans from different congregations attracted to Concord by 
work found in the cotton mills, and was organized September 
ioth, 1893, by Rev. George H. Cox, D. D., then President of the 
Synod. 

The church house is a neat frame structure, 46 x 32, built in 
gothic style. It was erected in 1889 and 1890, the work being 
carried on by the St. James' congregation and superintended by 
its pastor, the Rev. W. G. Campbell. It was dedicated Novem- 
ber 7th, 1897, by Rev. V. R. Stickley, the President of Synod, 
assisted by the pastor, Rev. H. A. McCullough, and Revs. J. Q. 
Wertz and C. B. Miller. The congregation numbers eighty- 
nine members. It has received considerable aid from Synod 
and is not yet self-sustaining. 

In 1899 a parsonage was erected by the pastorate, and was 
located on the corner of West Depot and Walter Streets. It 
was a neat cottage, containing ten rooms. It was destroyed by 
fire September 21st, 1900, but was immediately rebuilt by St. 
Andrew's congregation alone. 

The congregation was supplied by Rev. W. G. Campbell and 
other near-by pastors until November, 1894, then the following 
served as 

Pastors. 

Rev. J. D. Shealey 1S94 — 1S95. 

Rev. H. A. McCullough 1895— 1898. 

Rev. W. B. Oney 1S98— 1900. 

Rev. C. A. Brown 1900 — 1901. 



St. Luke's Church is located fourteen miles west from Salis- 
bury, on the Sherill's Ford Road. The congregation was or- 
ganized in 1870, by Rev. S. Rothrock, D. D. 

The corner-stone of the church building was laid in April, 
1871, and the edifice was completed and dedicated in May, 1872,, 
by Rev. S. Rothrock, D. D., and Rev. J. G. Neiffer. It is a large 



140 HISTORY OF NORTH CAROLINA SYNOD. 

brick structure, 60 x 40, with gothic windows and an inclined 
floor, and with a seating capacity of four hundred and fifty. 

The congregation also has an excellent parsonage, located 
about three-quarters of a mile west from the church, and built in 
1879. It is a two-story house, with an L, containing six rooms, 
and has attached a well of good water, stable, garden, orchard, 
and six acres of land. There are eighty members. 

Pastors. 

Rev. S. Rothrock, D. D 1869— 1875. 

Rev. V. R. Stickley 1876— 1882. 

Rev. J. U. Shirey, D. D 1S82— 1889. 

Rev. H. C. Haithcox, D. D 1890. 

Rev. B. W. Crook 1891 — 1894. 

Rev. H. W. Jeffcoat 1894 — 1900. 

Rev. B. S. Brown 1900. 

During this time the congregation has been vacant in the ag- 
gregate of four years. 



St. Luke's Church, Tyro, Davidson County, eight miles 
west from Lexington, was first known as " Swicegood's Meeting- 
house," and afterward as " Sandy Creek." It is one of the 
oldest congregations, and, in all probability, took part in the 
organization of the Synod in 1803. Just when it was organized 
we do not know, as no records can be found. 

Rev. Christopher Eberhardt Bernhardt came from Germany 
to North Carolina in 1787 and Rev. A. Roschen in 1788, and 
labored in that part of Rowan County lying east of the Yadkin 
River, now known as Davidson County, and in 1800 the Rev. 
Paul Henkel came from Virginia and labored in the same field, 
Rev. Bernhardt having removed to other parts. The prob- 
ability is that one of them organized the congregation some- 
where between 1787 and 1800. The original members of the 
congregation were what have since been called "Pennsylvania 
Germans," who settled in that neighborhood as early as 1764. 

The congregation is now worshiping in its fourth church 
building, all of which have stood upon the same ground. 



SKETCHES OF CONGREGATIONS. 149 

The first was a rude log-house, 24 x 20, which was destroyed 
by fire. 

The second was a reproduction of the first. 

The third was a frame building of the same size. 

The fourth and present house is a neat frame building, 58 x 
35, with gallery, annex, and two council-rooms, and having a 
seating capacity of four hundred and fifty. It was erected in 
1861, and dedicated the same year by Rev. W. A. Julian. 

A commodious two-story parsonage stands near the church, 
which was built in 1854, and which is deeded to the Trustees of 
the pastorate. The present membership is one hundred and 
eighty. 

We are not sure that we have the full list of pastors, but, so 
far as known, the following have served at different times and 
for different periods : 

Pastors. 

Rev. Paul Henkel, Rev. W. A. Julian, 

Rev. G. Shober, Rev. W. H. Cone, 

Rev. L. Markert, Rev. A. D. L. Moser, 

Rev. Jacob Scherer, Rev. J. D. Bowles, 

Rev. Jacob Miller, Rev. C. H. Bernheim, 

Rev. D. P. Rosenmiller, Rev. P. E. Zink, 

Rev. John Tabler, Rev. R. W. Petrea, 

Rev. Daniel Jenkins, Rev. J. M. Hedrick, 

Rev. Benjamin Arey, Rev. D. W. Michael, 

Rev. Jacob Crim, Rev. W. Kimball, 

Rev. J. B. Anthony, Rev. T. H. Strohecker, 
Rev. L. C. Groseclose, 

and the present pastor, Rev. P. J. Wade, who took charge in 1898. 



Shiloh Church is located twelve miles west from Winston, 
N. C, in Forsythe County, and constitutes a part of the Forsythe 
Mission. It is unknown when the congregation was first organized, 
but there are traditions reaching back to a very early date. It is. 
supposed to have been a union congregation with the Moravians,, 
as some of the pastors of that church preached there. It is now 



150 HISTORY OF NORTH CAROLINA SYNOD. 

' entirely Lutheran, but when the separation was effected is not 
known. 

The first house of worship was erected about a quarter of a 
mile from the present site. It was an old-time log-house, 
30 x 20, with the old-fashioned galleries. 

The present house is a brick structure, 46 x 32. It was erected 
in 1880 to 1 88 2, and was dedicated by the members of the 
Northern Conference in October, 1884. Its seating capacity is 
three hundred. The number of members is forty-two. 

The Forsythe Mission has an excellent parsonage located near 
Rural Hall. It was erected in 1S95, in the place of the old 
parsonage that stood near Nazareth Church, twelve miles north- 
east from Shiloh. 

Pastors. 

Rev. Paul Henkel, Rev. E. P. Parker, 

Rev. John Swicegood, Rev. W. R. Ketchie, 

Rev. W. Kimball, Rev. H. M. Brown, 

Rev. J. R. Sikes, Rev. H. A. Trexler, 

Rev. W. A. Lutz, Rev. R. L. Bame. 



Salem Church is located on the Beattie's Ford Road, seven 
miles west from Salisbury. 

There were twenty-two persons living in that neighborhood, 
who were members of Organ Church, situated seventeen miles 
away. Becoming wearied with the long journey to and from 
their church, at their request, in 1850, the Rev. B. N. Hopkins 
organized them into a congregation under the name of Salem 
Evangelical Lutheran Church. 

For some reason, not now known, the congregation did not 
make application for and was not admitted to Synod until 1854 ; 
since then it has always taken an active part in all the work of 
the Synod. 

The first house of worship was erected in 1850. It was a 
frame structure, 50 x 35, with a gallery at the back end. 

In 1882 the present building was erected. It is a churchly 



SKETCHES OF CONGREGATIONS. 



iS 1 



structure, 50 x 36, with a seating capacity of four hundred, and is 
free from debt. It was dedicated November 25th, 1883, by 
the pastor, Rev. J. D. Shirey, D. D., assisted by Rev. W. A. 
Lutz, who preached the dedicatory sermon. 

Mr. John Barger donated thirty acres of land when the con- 
gregation was first organized. Upon this tract the church stands, 
as also an excellent parsonage erected during the pastorship of 
Rev.V, Y. Boozer, in 1894. It is a two-story frame building, con- 
taining six rooms, nicely finished, and with all things arranged 
for the comfort and convenience of the pastor. It belongs to 
the Salem pastorate. 

The present membership is one hundred and thirty-five. The 
congregation has had but few and short vacancies. 

Pastors. 

Rev. B. N. Hopkins 1S50— 1S54 

Rev. J. S! Heilig 1854 — 1S59 

Rev. Jacob Crim 1859 — 1862 

Rev. S. Scherer 1862— 1868 

Rev. S. Rothrock, D. D 1868— 1S75 

Rev. V. R. Stickley 1875— 1882 

Rev. J. D. Shirey, D. D 1882— 1889 

Rev. H. C. Haithcox, D. D 18S9— 1S90 

Rev. B. W. Cronk 1890— 1894 

Rev. V. Y. Boozer 1S94 — 1895 

Rev. H. N. Miller, Ph. D TS95— 1S97 

Rev. H. A. Trexler 1897. 



Trinity Church is located in Cabarrus County, N. C, 
miles from Concord. 



The congregation originally came out from old St. John's 
Church, and was organized by Rev. J. S. Heilig, in 1857. 

The first house of worship was a frame building, 40 x 30, 
erected the same year of the organization. 

The present house is a brick structure, 60 x 40, with a seating 
capacity of four hundred, and cost $3000.00. It was erected in 
1897, and was dedicated on the second Sunday in November, 1897. 



152 HISTORY OF NORTH CAROLINA SYNOD. 

The sermon was delivered by Rev. M. G. G. Scherer. Rev. J. 
Q. Wertz and Rev. H. N. Miller, Ph. D., assisted Pastor Stickley 
in the dedicatory exercises. 

The congregation owns an interest in the parsonage at Enoch- 
ville, N. C. The present membership is seventy-four. 

Pastors. 

Rev. J. S. Heilig 1857— 1866. 

Rev. J. W. Barrier 1866— 1867. 

Rev. A. D. L. Moser 1868— 1873. 

Rev. W. A. Julian 1874 — 1879. 

Rev. W. A. Lutz 1880— 1891. 

Rev. V. R. Stickley 1892. 



Union Church, originally known as "Pine" Church, is 
located in Rowan County, N. C, five miles southeast from Salis- 
bury. 

There are no records to show when the congregation was first 
organized, but, judging from other historical facts and dates 
that are recorded, it is reasonable to suppose that the congrega- 
tion was organized by Rev. J. G. Arends in the year 1784, and 
was one of the congregations that participated in the organization 
of the Synod in 1803. 

Of the first house of worship very little is known, except that 
it was built of pine logs, and hence called the "Pine Meeting- 
house. ' ' 

The present building is of brick, 60 x 40, with gallery in one 
end, and with a seating capacity of about four hundred. It was 
erected in 1878 and 1879, during the pastorship of Rev. R. L. 
Brown, and was dedicated on the first Sunday in December, 
1879, the President of Synod, Rev. L. A. Bikle, D. D., preach- 
ing the sermon. 

Rev. S. Rothrock, D. D. , lies buried in the graveyard near 
the church. 



SKETCHES OF CONGREGATIONS. 1 53 

The congregation owns a nice parsonage, two-stories high, 
with an L, containing six rooms. There are also necessary out- 
buildings, and several acres of land. The membership is now 
two hundred and sixty-eight. 

Pastors. 

Rev. J. G. Arends, Rev. W. H. Cone, 

Rev. C. A. G. Storch, Rev. A. U. L. Moser, 

Rev. Daniel Jenkins, Rev. R. L. Brown, 

Rev. S. Rothrock, D. D., Rev. J. M. Hedrick, 

Rev. William Artz, Rev. J. W. Strickler, 

Rev. J. B. Anthony, Rev. J. Q. Wertz, 

Rev. L. C. Groseclose, Rev. C. A. Brown, 

Rev. S. Scherer, Rev. J. P. Miller. 



Zion Church is located fourteen miles south from Greens- 
boro, in Guilford County, N. C. It was organized about the 
year 1812, by Rev. Jacob Scherer, and was composed of members 
transferred from Lau's Church, with which it has always been 
in pastorate relation. At first it was a union church, composed 
of Lutherans and German Reformed. In 1820, when the Ten- 
nessee Synod was organized, a part of the Lutherans united with 
that Synod, and from then until 1845 there were three congre- 
gations worshiping in one house. Then it became wholly 
Lutheran, and remains so to this day, although two congregations 
are jointly owning the property. 

The congregation belonging to the North Carolina Synod now 
numbers twenty-eight members. The Tennessee congregation 
has always been numerically the stronger. 

The first house of worship erected when the congregation was 
first organized was a log-house, with end and side galleries. 

The present building is a pretty frame structure, erected in 
1856, and is 50 x 40, with a seating capacity of about four hun- 
dred. 



154 HISTORY OF NORTH CAROLINA SYNOD. 

Pastors. 

Rev. Jacob Scherer, Rev. William A. Julian, 

Rev. William Artz, Rev. E. P. Parker, 

Rev. John Swicegood, Rev. A. D. L. Moser, 

Rev. Simeon Scherer, Rev. B. W. Cronk, 

Rev. B. C. Hall, Rev. H. M. Brown. 



CHAPTER XV. 

NOTEWORTHY TRANSACTIONS OK SYNOD. 

1803 Monday, May 2d, the first conference or convention to 
organize the Synod of North Carolina met in Salisbury, 
N. C. The Sunday previous several of the ministers 
preached in Pine Church, now Union Church, where the 
Holy Supper was administered to many communicants. 
The ministers present at this convention were : 

1. Rev. Johann Gottfried Arends, of Lincoln County. 

2. Rev. Robert J. Miller, English Lutheran preacher, 
of the same county. 

3. Rev. Carl August Gottlieb Storch, near Salisbury. 

4. Rev. Paul Henkel, from Abbot's Creek, Rowan 
County. 

It was resolved that Pastor Paul Henkel should visit 
Rev. Arends' congregation next August, and perform the 
necessary Ministerial Acts, because Pastor Arends' want 
of sight and other bodily infirmities disabled him from 
attending to them. This was accordingly done. 

1803 Monday, October 17th, the North Carolina Synod re- 
assembled with the above-mentioned ministers and Philip 
Henkel as Catechist. Place of meeting, Lincolnton, N. C. 
At this meeting the first Constitution was adopted. 

1804 Very little business was transacted at this meeting of 
the Synod, because most all the ministers were incapaci- 
tated on account of the prevailing fever. 

1810 Protracted meetings were recommended, to last three 
days, to which Moravian and Reformed ministers should 
be welcomed to assist ; this was resolved on motion of 
Rev. Philip Henkel. At this meeting, Rev. Gottlieb 
Schober, of the Moravian Church, was ordained as a 
Lutheran minister. 

(155) 



156 HISTORY OF NORTH CAROLINA SYNOD. 

181 1 The Minutes contain the " Extract of the Journal of Rev. 
Robert Johnson Miller, the First Missionary of the Lu- 
theran Church in North Carolina." 

The Minutes were printed for the first time in the 
English language, and contain ' ' A Proposed Constitu- 
tion for an Orphan School in the United States, Consti- 
tuted by the Synod of the Lutheran Ministry of North 
Carolina," containing ten articles. Also an order of 
service for the burial of the dead. 

1813 The Minutes of this meeting are lengthy, 52 pages. They 
contain the missionary journals of Revs. R. J. Miller 
and Jacob Scherer ; besides extracts of sermons, and ac- 
counts of remarkable occurrences, furnished by Rev. 
Miller. 

1814 An Appendix to the Minutes contains the correspondence 
of Revs. Storch and Schober with Bishop Von Vleck, of 
the Moravian Church, for a supply of ministers, which 
was fruitless, as the Bishop laments that the want of min- 
isters is also great in his own Church. 

1815 The Synod ordered a special conference to be held in 
Bethel Church, Lexington District, S. C, by Revs. 
Storch, Miller, and Schober, and the Lutheran ministers 
in the vicinity, to adjust certain difficulties and misun- 
derstandings of the rules of Synod. This conference 
was held and the best results followed. Their report was 
submitted at the next meeting of Synod. 

1816 Trouble arose in Synod, from Lincoln County, N. C, 
about the ordination question, that licensed candidates 
should not perform Ministerial Acts without having been 
first ordained. But the Synod resolved that it would not 
act differently from the Pennsylvania Ministerium, that a 
licentiate could with good conscience perform all minis- 
terial duties. 

1817 A letter was read from Rev. John Bachman, D. D., of 
Charleston, S. C, in which he expressed the desire that a 
theological seminary, to educate ministers, would be estab- 
lished ; that his congregation would cheerfully contribute 



NOTEWORTHY TRANSACTIONS OF SYNOD. 1 57 

toward this object. That he regrets not being able to 
attend this Synod, though he belongs to the New York 
Ministerium, because of the season of the year in which 
the North Carolina Synod is held. 

It was also ordered that the book, " Luther," be pub- 
lished in the English language, and that the English 
minutes be published in the same. 

1819 Time of meeting changed from Trinity Sunday to second 
Sunday after Easter ; this was done to elect and send 
deputies to the Ministerium of Pennsylvania, held in 
Baltimore, Md., on Trinity Sunday, for the purpose of 
forming a general union of all Lutheran Synods, which 
resulted, a year later, in the organization of the General 
Synod. 

This change of time became the beginning of the 
division in the North Carolina Synod, and occurred at 
St. John's Church, Cabarrus County, then called Buffalo 
Creek Church. 

1820 Repeated and earnest efforts were made at this Synod to 
heal the breach made in the Synod last year, but without 
success, so the following fall the seceding party organized 
the Evangelical Lutheran Tennessee Synod. 

1821 Rev. R. J. Miller took his departure from Synod to unite 
with the -Episcopal Church, and Rev. J. E. Bell reported 
by letter that he had united himself with the Presbyterian 
Church. 

1824 A letter from South Carolina was read, informing the 
Synod that the ministers in that State had taken steps to 
form their own Synod, but desiring to labor in har- 
mony with this body, which feeling was reciprocated, 
and, in 1825, a delegate was appointed to visit said 
Synod. 

1827 First settled pastor sent to Illinois — the Rev. John C. A. 
Schoenberg. 

1828 " The Evangelical Lutheran Missionary Society for North 
Carolina and Adjacent States" was organized. 

1831 March 27th, the Rev. C. A. G. Storch, Senior of this 



J58 HISTORY OF NORTH CAROLINA SYNOD. 

Ministerium, departed this life, of which the Synod made 
honorable and affectionate mention. 
1832 The second and very lengthy Constitution adopted. 

1834 The congregation at Hillsboro, 111., organized by Rev.. 
Daniel Scherer, was received in connection with the 
North Carolina Synod. 

1835 Messrs. Charles Fisher, Emanuel Shober, Daniel M. Bar- 
ringer, Colonel John Smith, and Rev. Daniel Jenkins 
were appointed a committee to formulate a plan for a 
manual labor school, in the bounds of Synod, and to re- 
ceive bids for its location, which, however, resulted fruit- 
lessly, doubtless owing to the overture made by the Synod 
of South Carolina the next year ( 1836), when Rev. E. L. 

1836 Hazelius, D. D., and Mr. Henry Muller were sent as com- 
missioners to induce this Synod to make the classical and 
theological institution at Lexington, S. C, also our insti- 
tution of learning. The liberal offer of the South Caro- 
lina Synod was accepted, and this relationship continued 
until the establishment of North Carolina College. 

1840 The third Constitution of Synod adopted, and printed 
in the Minutes, as formerly. 

1841 " The Secretary brought to the notice of Synod the con- 
dition of the lands bequeathed to the Directors of the 
Seminary at Gettysburg, Pa., amounting to two thousand 
acres or more, by our late venerable Father Shober, stat- 
ing that during an interview lately had with E. Shober, 
Esq., executor, he (E. Shober) stated that he had written 
to the President of the General Synod, and to the Direc- 
tors of the Theological Seminary at Gettysburg, request- 
ing them to appoint an agent to dispose of the lands, to 
prevent intrusion, etc. ; and that all his communications 
thus addressed had been treated with neglect. He also 
informed the Secretary that, since the death of his father, 
he had regularly paid the taxes on said lands, but that he 
could do so no longer. Whereupon, it was 

'■'Resolved, That the President correspond with the 
Directors of the Theological Seminary at Gettysburg, 



NOTEWORTHY TRANSACTIONS OF SYNOD. 1 59. 

relative to the lands bequeathed to that institution by our 
venerable Father Shober, deceased, with a view that they 
may not be lost to the Church." 

1842 The President of Synod reported that he had addressed 
"a letter to the Board, and received an answer from 
their Secretary, Rev. John N. Hoffman, in which he 
assures us that due attention shall be paid to the subject, 
and that every effort will be made to secure the bequest 
of Father Shober. ' ' 

Later on the Synod was informed that Rev. S. S. 
Schmucker was authorized to sell these lands ; but as 
they were located in the mountains of North Carolina 
very little was realized from the sale of them. Had they 
been retained until this time, they would have become 
exceedingly valuable for the timber alone that was stand- 
ing on them. 

1843 Considerable money was raised for a Centenary Fund, 
and several succeeding Synods made large additions 
thereto. These funds were applied to the various objects 
of the Synod, and finally to the then future college. 

1846 Another Constitution of the Synod was adopted, and 
appended to the Minutes. 

1852 The first step was taken toward the establishment of a 
male institution of learning in the bounds of the Synod ; 
suggested in the President's report; and 

1853 In commemoration of the semi-centennial of the organi- 
zation of the Synod, the establishment of the Western 
Carolina Male Academy, Mount Pleasant, N. C, was 
decided at a convention held for that purpose in Con- 
cord, N. C, July 21st, 1852, and carried into effect. 
In the year 1859 the academy became a college. Special 
services were resolved to be held in all the churches in 
gratitude to God for His blessing during the past fifty 
years of the existence of the Synod. 

1855 The fifth Constitution of Synod was adopted and printed 
with the Minutes. Also at a convention preceding the 
meeting of Synod, all the congregations connected 



l60 HISTORY OF NORTH CAROLINA SYNOD, 

with the Synod formed themselves into regular pastorates, 
making in all about twelve charges. 

1858 A committee was appointed to visit the cities of Wilming- 
ton and Newbern, to inquire into the condition of the 
German and English Lutherans residing there, with the 
view of organizing Lutheran Churches in those places. 
The committee succeeded in organizing St. Paul's Luth- 
eran Church in Wilmington. 

1859 St. Mark's Lutheran Church in the city of Charlotte was 
organized. The establishment of these new congrega- 
tions in these two important cities of our State gave the 
Synod a prominence in the Church-at -large, and a spirit 
of progress which has been a blessing to it up to this 
time. Rev. John H. Mengert was chosen as the mis- 
sionary in Wilmington, and Rev. Alexander Phillippi the 
missionary to labor in Charlotte. 

1861 The Synod to a certain extent severed its connection with 
the General Synod, as the war between the States made 
" it impracticable to send our delegates to the next meet- 
ing to convene at Lancaster, Pa." 

1862 The Synod finally withdrew from the General Synod, and 
resolved to form, in connection with other Lutheran 
Synods in the South, a Southern General Synod of their 
own. 

1868 The first step was taken to arrange for a colored Lutheran 
ministry to labor exclusively among the colored popula- 
tion of this State, which finally resulted in forming their 
own Synod. 

The female seminary at Mount Pleasant, N. C, be- 
came an institution of the Synod ; the money for that 
purpose having been collected at the North by Rev. G. 
D. Bernheim. 

1869 At an adjourned meeting of Synod, held in Salem Church, 
Rowan County, August 26th, 1869, the North Carolina 
Synod adopted a thoroughly Lutheran doctrinal basis, 
conformable to the teachings of the symbolical books. 

1870 The sixth Constitution of Synod, as adopted at the ad- 



NOTEWORTHY TRANSACTIONS OF SYNOD. l6l 

journed meeting of last year, was appended to and printed 
with the Minutes of this year. 
187 1 The Synod dissolved its connection with the Southern 
General Synod. 

1879 The seventh Constitution of Synod was printed with this 
year's Minutes. 

1880 The " Proposed Constitution for the Use of Congregations 
of the Synod " was published with the Minutes ; so also 
was the Constitution of Synod republished. 

1881 Synod reunited with the General Synod of the South. 
1887 Synod was incorporated by an Act of the Legislature of 

North Carolina. (See Minutes, page 18. ) 

Synod was informed of the merging of the Southern 
General Synod into the United Synod of the Evangelical 
Lutheran Church in the South, which was consummated 
June, 1886, without a negative vote, thus healing the 
long-continued division of 1819 and 1820, "and uniting 
all the Lutheran Synods in the South Atlantic States into 
one general body. ' ' 

1889 The colored Lutheran ministers were organized at their 
special request into a separate Synod of their own, under 
the name and title of the Alpha Synod ; they subse- 
quently united themselves with the Missouri Synod. 

August 27th, 1889, a new or revised Constitution of 
Synod was adopted, making the eighth in number. 

1891 Two important legacies for the benefit of our Church in 
North Carolina were reported this year; they were made 
by Capt. W. A. Barrier, who departed this life in Char- 
lotte, October 8th, 1890 ; and Capt. T. L. Seigle, also 
of Charlotte, who died February 27th, 1891 : both these 
legacies were in favor of St. Mark's Lutheran Church, 
Charlotte; that of Capt. Barrier also included $1000.00 
to North Carolina College and a considerable sum to 
our Southern Theological Seminary, with the proviso 
that, if said seminary should fail of being established, the 
amount intended for that institution should be given to 
this Synod for the benefit of Home Missions. A copy of 



1 62 HISTORY OF NORTH CAROLINA SYNOD. 

Capt. Barrier's will is published in the Minutes of this 
year. 
1892 Several years ago a legacy was left to Synod by Mr. M. 

A. Blackwelder, which was, however, involved in litigation, 
and Synod did not receive any benefit from it until 1892 
(see page 25 of Minutes of Synod), when Synod dis- 
posed of its interest in the land to Mr. A. D. Misen- 
heimer for the sum of $500.00. 

1896 The Synod this year was called upon to mourn the loss 
of three of its most useful and worthy members: Rev. J. 

B. Davis, D.D., was taken from earth to heaven in Salem, 
Va. , January 3d, 1896, formerly President of North Caro- 
lina College, an able preacher, and a very scholarly man. 
The next was Mr. I. Frank Patterson, the honored Treas- 
urer of Synod, called away in the midst of his years and 
usefulness, and who bequeathed to the Synod the sum of 
$2000.00, the interest of which is to be devoted to Home 
Missions in the bounds of this Synod ; a very timely 
legacy and very much needed. Mr. Patterson died at 
China Grove, N. C, February 18th, 1S96. After him, 
the Lord called Rev. Prof. J. D. Shirey, D. D., Presi- 
dent of North Carolina College, to his rest, who departed 
this life in Mount Pleasant, N. C, on Easter Sunday 
morning, April 5th, 1896. Rev. B. H. W. Runge's 
death was also reported at this Synod. This young brother 
was but thirteen days in the ministry, and died in Wil- 
mington, N. C, June 15th, 1895. 

1899 The Theological Seminary of the South was removed from 
Newberry, S. C, to Mount Pleasant, near Charleston, 
S. C, in the fall of 1898, and has now a local habitation 
of its own, which has brought it at once into prominence 
and gave it prosperity. It was reported in the Minutes 
in the following glowing terms: "It is with special 
gratitude and encouragement we can call attention to the 
fact that this school of the prophets has been perma- 
nently established in a home of its own in Mount Pleasant, 



NOTEWORTHY TRANSACTIONS OF SYNOD. 163 

S. C. , a suburb of the city of Charleston ; and that, at its 
head, has been secured the services of our beloved brother, 
Rev. J. A. Morehead, who, with the able assistance of 
the local talent of Charleston, afford the institution a 
strong and ample teaching force. ' ' 



CHAPTER 

A TABULATED SKETCH OF EVERY MINISTER THAT 



(Read across both pages.) 



W 
« 

P 

'A 


Names of Ministers. 


Licensed, Where, When, 
by Whom. 


Ordained, Where, When, 
by Whom. 




Adolph Nussmann 

Johann Gottfried Arends 

Arnold Roschen 

Christopher E. Bernhardt 

Charles A. G. Storch 

Robert J. Miller 

PaulHenkel 




As a converted Roman Catholic priest... 

Organ Church, Aug. 28, 1775, by Rev. 
Joachim Buelow. 


2 

3 
4 

S 
6 


As teacher, Oct. 16, 1772, in Gottingen, 
Germany. 

Came to North Carolina, fall of 1788... . 


Wurtemberg, Germany,- about 1785 

Helmstaedt, Germany, March 12, 1788, by 
Rev. J. C. Velthusen, D. D. 

St. John's, Cabarrus, May 20, 1794, by the 
Lutheran ministry in North Carolina. 

Philadelphia Pa., June 6, 1792, Pennsyl- 
vania Ministerium. 

Union Church, N. C, April, 1805, North 
Carolina Synod. 

Abbot's Creek Church, Oct., 1808, North 
Carolina Synod. 


Came to North Carolina, Sept. 1788. . . . 


7 

8 


1781, by Pennsylvania Ministerium 

June, 1800, by Pennsylvania Minis- 
terium. 

Davidson Co., Oct. 22, 1804, North 
Carolina Synod. 

Abbot's Creek, Oct. 22, 1804, North 
Carolina Synod. 

Organ Church, Oct. 23, 1810 

Member of the Methodist Church 

Organ Church, Oct. 23, 1810, North 

Carolina Synod. 
Organ Church, Oct. 23, 1810, North 

Carolina Synod. 


Philip Henkel 


9 


John Ludwig Markert.. . 

John Michael Rickert. . 

Gottlieb Schober 

Jacob Grieson 


ii 


Organ Church, Oct. 21,1810, North Caro- 
lina Synod. 


J 3 

14 
IS 


On the list of 1810 




In South Carolina, spring of 1812, by Rev. 
Storch and others, in special conference. 

Lau's Church, Oct. 18, 1812, North Caro- 
lina Synod. 

Lincolnton, N. C, April 6, 1812, by North 
Carolina Synod. 

Lau's Church, Oct. 20, 1812, North Caro- 
lina Synod. 

St. John's, Cabarrus, April 28, 1819, 
North Carolina Synod. 

In 1822, by G. Dreher and M. Rauch, 
committee of North Carolina Synod. 




Charles Z. H. Schmidt. . 
John P. Franklow 


r 7 


Lincolnton, April 6, 1812, North Caro- 
lina Synod. 

Lincolnton, April 6, 1812, North Caro- 
lina Synod. 

Lau's Church, Oct. 19, 1812, North 
Carolina Synod. 

Oct. 19, 1812, Lau's Church, North 

Carolina Synod. 
Oct. 20, 1812, Lau's Church, North 

Carolina Synod. 
Oct. 20, 1812, Lau's Church, North 

Carolina Synod. 
Oct. 20, 1812, Lau's Church, North 

Carolina Synod. 


19 
20 




John Yost Meetze 




Philip Roth 




2 3 




June 4, 1822, Pilgrim's Church, North 
Carolina Synod. 





(164) 



XVI. 

HAS EVER BEEN CONNECTED WITH THE SYNOD. 



Admitted to 

North Carolina 

Synod, Whence, 

When. 



Removed, How, 
When. 



Age. 
Yrs. Mos. Dys. 



Buried. 



The pioneer Lutheran 
pastor in North Car- 
olina. 

One of the organizers of: 
the North Carolina 
Synod. 



Died Nov. 3, 1794. 
Died July 9, 1807.. 



4 Oct. 20, 18 



One of the organizers 

of Synod. 
One of the organizers 

of Synod. 
One of the organizers 

of Synod. 
Oct. 17, 1803, as cate- 

chet. 
Labored in Davidson 

Co.,N. C. 



Returned to Germany. 

Died in South Carolina, 
Aug. 27, 1809. 

Died March 27, 1831 . . . . 

Died 1834 

Died Nov. 27, 1825 

Died Oct. 9,1833 

Died Nov. 22, 1850 



Dropped by North Caro- 
lina Synod, May 4,1833. 
Died June 29, 1838 



Labored in Stokes and 

Forsythe Counties. 
Always a member of Died Aug. 13, 1854 

North Carolina 

Synod. 
Nothing more heard of 

him. 



Labored in South Car- 
olina. 



An organizer of South 
Carolina Synod. 



Died July 28, 1S75 

Died March 2, i860 

Died in Tennessee, 1814.' 

Died in South Carolina, 

Sept. 4, 1829. 
Died in Lincoln Co., July 

11, 1839. 
Died Feb. 26, 1869 i 



An organizer of South 
Carolina Synod. 

> An organizer of South Died May 7, 1833 

Carolina Synod. 

Expelled Oct. 21, i8i7,by 

North Carolina Synod. 
Died in 1824. 



Labored in Guilford 
Co., N. C. 



23 Moved to Indiana. 



55 3 Some. St. John's Grave- 
yard, Cabarrus 
Co., N. C. 

66 6 28 Lincolnton, N. C. 



(165) 



Remarks. 



Near St. Michael's 
Church, South 
Carolina. 
11 Organ Church. 



Lenoir, N. C Returned to Episcopal 

I Church, June, 1821. 
11 1 New Market, Va. . .'Abundant in labors. 



Labored in Davidson 

Co.,N.C. 

Came to America two 
years before Storch. 



17 Randolph Co., N.C. 
.. I Portland Mills, Ind. 



3 2 7 26 [Salem, N. C. 
36 3 ig ! Guilford Co. 



Labored often as trav- 
eling missionary. 

First Missionary of 
Synod in Ohio, In- 
diana, and Illinois. 



Wanted to be ordained' 
j as a Reformed min- 
ister. 
Lexington District, |United with Tennessee: 

S. C. Synod. 

Columb'us, Texas . .Abundant in labors. 
j 



Lexington District, 

S. C. 
Lincoln Co., N. C. 



Lexington County, 
S. C. 

Lexington District, 

s. c. 



Honored for his long 
and useful life in the 
Church. 



i66 



HISTORY OF NORTH CAROLINA SYNOD. 



Names of Ministers. 



Licensed, When, Where, 
by Whom. 



David Henkel 

John Peter Schmucker. 

26 Jacob Zink 

27; Andrew Henkel 

28 Adam Miller 

29 John Dreher 

3o!Daniel Scherer 

31' Daniel Watcher 



Ordained, When, Where, 
by Whom. 



June 6, 1819, by Philip Henkel.. 
May 30, 1820, Lincolnton, N. C. 



32 Joseph E. Bell 

33 Martin Walther.. . . 

34 Michael McMakin. 

35 Jacob Moser 

36 Martin Kibler 

t 
■57; Adam Grimes 

! 

38, Andrew Seechrist.. 

39'john Reichert 

40 Samuel Herscher. . . 



Oct. 19, 1813, Pilgrim's Church, North 

Carolina Synod. 
Oct. 19, 1813, Pilgrim's Church, North 

Carolina Synod. 
Oct. 18, 1814, Organ Church, North July 19, 1820, Solomon's, Tenn., Tennes- 

Carolina Synod. 1 see Synod. 
Oct. 19, 1814, Organ Church, North! 

Carolina Synod. 



Oct. 17, 1815, Emanuel's Church, North 
Carolina Synod. 

Oct. 17, 1815, Emanuel's Church, North 
Carolina Synod. 

Oct. 22, 1816, Guilford Co., North Caro- 
lina Synod. 

Oct. 22, 1816, Guilford 1 Co., North Caro- 
lina Synod. 



July 19, 1820, Solomon's, Tenn., Tennes- 
see Synod. 
Was never ordained 



June 18, 1821, Lau's Church, North Caro- 
lina Synod. 
Was never ordained ". 



June 6, 1819, by Philip Henke 



April 4, 1824, St. John's, Lexington Dis- 
trict, S. C, by South Carolina Synod. 



41 William Jenkins 

42 Daniel J. Hauer, D. D.. 

43 John C. A. Schoenberg . 
44JJohn Reck 

45 John P. Klein (Cline).. . 

46 Julius C. W. Schyler. .. . 

47 Henry Graeber, M. D.. . 
4S William Artz 

49! David P. Rosenmiller.. . 

I 

50 Jacob Kaempffer 

5 1 Joh n T . Tabler 

52 Samuel Rothrock, D. D, 



Oct. 22, 1816, Guilford Co., North Caro 

lina Synod. 
Oct. 21. 1S17, Pilgrim's Church, North June 18, 1821, Lau's Church, by North 

Carolina Synod. Carolina Synod. 

Oct. 22, 1817, Pilgrim's Church, North 

Carolina Synod. 
May 31, 1820, Lincolnton, North Caro- 
lina Synod. 
May 31, 1820, Lincolnton, North Caro- 
lina Synod. 
June 18, 1821, Lau's Church, North Was never ordained 

Carolina Synod. 
June 18, 1821, Lau's Church, North May 4, 1831, Organ Church, North Caro- 

Carolina Synod. | lina Synod. 
June 19, 1821, Lau's Church, North Was never ordained 

Carolina Synod. 
June 4, 1822, Pilgrim's Church, North Jan. 14, 1824, St. Michael's, S. C, by 

Carolina Synod. | South Carolina Synod,. 

I 
May 4, 1824, St. John's, Cabarrus, May 7, 1828. Union Church, Rowan, 

North Carolina Synod. j North Carolina Synod. 

May 9, 1826, Zion's Church, Botetourt May 6, 1829, St. John's, Wythe, Va., by 

Co., Va., North Carolina Synod. I North Carolina Synod. 

Jan. 15, 1824, St. Michael's, South;May 7, 1828, Union Church, Rowan, 

Carolina Synod. i North Carolina Synod. 

May 10, 1826, Zion's Church, Botetourt 

Co., Va., by North Carolina Synod. 
Zion's Church, Va., May 8, 1826, North St. John's, Virginia, May 6,1829, North 

Carolina Synod. j Carolina Synod. 
St. Paul's, Lincoln Co., May 9, 1827/ 

North Carolina Synod. 
June 7, 1818, by Pennsylvania Synod.. Fredericktown, Md., Sept. 5, 1821 



Lau's Church, May 4, 1830, North Caro- Organ Church, May 4, 1831, North Caro 
I lina Synod. 1 lina Synod. 

Lau's Church, May 4, 1830, North Caro- Organ Church, May 4, 1831, North Caro 

lina Synod. 1 lina Synod. 

Lau's Church, May 4, 1830, North Caro- Organ Church, May 4, 1831, North Caro 

lina Synod. lina Synod. 
St. Paul's Church, Lincoln Co., May 21, 

1832, North Carolina Synod. 
Frieden's Church, May 4, 1833, North St. Paul's Church, Virginia, May 7, 1834, 

Carolina Synod. ] North Carolina Synod. 



53 Daniel Jenkins St. Paul's Church, Virginia, May 7, 1S34, 

North Carolina Synod. 

54! Edwin A. Bolles Pilgrim's Church, May 17, 1836, North Ebenezer, Georgia, March 12, 1837, by 

I Carolina Svnod. South Carolina Svnod. 



TABULATED SKETCH OF MINISTERS CONNECTED WITH THE SYNOD. 



167 



Admitted to 

North Carolina 

Synod, Whence, 

When. 



Removed, How, 
When. 



Died June 15, 1831. 



Age. 

Yrs.Mos.Dys. 



Remarks. 



36 1 11 Lincoln Co. 



Died April 23, 1870 79 

I 
|Died July 6, 1844 



[Died 1847, Lexington 

District, S. C. 
iDied April 4, 1852 I 



Germantown, Ohio, 

Washington Co., 
1 Va. 



An organizer of Ten- 
nessee Synod. 
Labored in Virginia. 



Mt. Carmel, 111. 



Expelled by North Caro- 
lina Synod, May 5, 
1823. 

Joined the Presbyterians, 
May 20, 1821. 



Joined the Tennessee 

Synod. 
Died Dec. 26, 1865 



Labored in North Car- 
olina and Illinois. 



Joined the Maryland' 

Synod. 
Died March 22, 1868 In his 82d year. Wilkes Co. 



Expelled May 5, 1835. 
Died in South Carolina. 



An organizer of South 
Carolina Synod. 



Expelled by South Caro- 
lina Synod, Nov. 26, 
! 1825. 
Died Oct. 27, 1877 , 75 



42 Died Nov. 27, 1901 . 



95 



Shelbyville, Term. 
Hanover, Pa. 



Died. 



Maryland and Virginia Died Sept. 11, 1843 50 7 13 

Synod, 1828. 
Died April 19, 1876 71 10 18 

Died Sept. 26, 1880 71 3 4 

Died Jan. 20, 1880 [ 79 5 27 

Expelled Sept. 28, 1841. 

Died Nov. 2, 1894 84 11 6 



53 

54 Died Dec. 22, iS 



New Market, Va. 

Organ Church. 
St. John's, Cab. Co. 
Lancaster, Pa. 
Glen Rock, Pa. 



Union Church, 
Rowan Co., N. C. 



Labored in Tennessee. 



Missionary to Illinois. 



81 9 12 Columbia, S. C. 



Labored all his life in 
North Carolina, a 
ministry of sixty-one 
years. 



i68 



HISTORY OF NORTH CAROLINA SYNOD. 



2 I Names of Ministers. 



Licensed, Where, When, 
by Whom. 



Ordained, Where, When, 
by Whom. 



Benjamin Arey Pilgrim's Church, May 17, 1836, North 

Carolina Synod. 
John Schweisguth Pilgrim's Church, May 18, 1836, North 

(Swicegood). Carolina Synod. 

Elijah Hawkins St. John's Church, Lexington, S. C, 

Nov. 16, 1836, South Carolina Synod. 
Philip A. Strobel St. John's Church, Lexington, S. C, 

Nov. 16, 1836, South Carolina Synod. 
Jacob Crim St. John's, Charleston, S. C, Nov. 16, 

1837, South Carolina Synod. 
Tohn J. Greever St. Michael's Church, Oct. 6, 1840, North 

Carolina Synod. 
N. Aldrich St. Michael's Ch., Oct. 6, 1840, North 

Carolina Synod. 
Gideon Scherer St. Michael's Church, Oct. 6, 1840, North 

Carolina Synod. 

John D. Scheck Ebenezer, Georgia, Nov. 26, 1827, South 

Carolina Synod. 
William G. Harter St. John's, Charleston, S. C, Nov. 16, 

1837, South Carolina Synod. 
Joseph A. Linn St. James' Church, Concord, May 6, 

1844, North Carolina Synod. 

Jacob B. Anthony ' By Methodist Church in 183 

William H. Fink Organ Church, May 3, 1847, North Was never ordained 

Carolina Synod. 

John H. Coffman St. Paul's, Catawba, May 8, 1S48, North Was never ordained 

Carolina Synod. 

Burrell N. Hopkins St. John's, Cabarrus, Mayo, 1849, North Was never ordained 

Carolina Synod. 

Levi C. Groseclose Pine Grove, Va., Sept. 6, 1849, South- 
western Virginia Synod. 

John S. Heilig St. Stephen's Church, May 6, 1851, 

North Carolina Synod. 



Zion's Church, Virginia, May 16, 1838, 

North Carolina Synod. 
Hopewell Church, Aug. 31, 1851, North 

Carolina Synod. 
Zion's Church, Virginia, May 16, 1838, 

North Carolina Synod. 
Zion's Church, Virginia, May 16, 1838, 

North Carolina Synod. 
Sandy Creek, N. C, Nov. 7, 1841, North 

Carolina Synod. 
Zion's Church, Virginia, May 24, 1842, 

North Carolina Synod. 
Ebenezer, Georgia, Nov. 31, 1841, South 

Carolina Synod. 
Zion's Church, Virginia, May 24, 1842, 

North Carolina Synod. 

St. Paul's Church, Newberry District, 
Nov. 21, 1830, South Carolina Synod. 

St. John's Church, Broad River, S. C, 
Nov. 13, 1838, South Carolina Synod. 

St. Matthew's Church, Rowan, July 27, 
1845, North Carolina Synod. 



St. Peter's Church, Virginia. Sept. 24, 1850, 
Southwestern Virginia Synod. 

St. Enoch's Church, Oct. 29, 1854, North 
Carolina Synod. 



Simeon Scherer St. Peter's. Virginia, Aug. 30, 18 

Southwestern Virginia Synod. 
William Gerhard, D. D.. Mifflinburg, Pa., Sept. 28/1847 



Daniel I. Dreher St. Matthew's Church, South Carolina, 

Nov. 16. 1853, South Carolina Svncd. 
Bryant C. Hall Fredericktown, N. C. May 8/1855, 

North Carolina Synod. 
Paul Kistler Ebenezer, Georgia, Nov. 31, 1841, South 

Carolina Synod. 
Caleb Lentz St. Enoch's, North Carolina, May 6, 

1856, North Carolina Synod. 
William A. Julian St. Enoch's, North Carolina, May 6, 

1S56, North Carolina Synod. 
G. D. Bernheim, D. D. . St. Andrew's, Lexington District, S. C, 

Nov. 14. 1849, South Carolina Synod. 
1 John L. Smithdeal St. Paul's. Alamance, N. C, May 3. 

1858, North Carolina Synod. 

John H. Mengert University of Basel, Aug., 1836. . 

Daniel H. Bittle, D. D. . Cincinnati. Ohio, April 18, 1S48. . 



St. Peter's Church, Virginia, Sept. 24, 1850. 
Southwestern Virginia Synod. 

Pottsville, Pa., May 29, 1850, Pennsyl- 
vania Ministerium. 

Concord. N. C, June 8,1856 



Luther Chapel, North Carolina, Aug.) 

29, 1858. 
St. Matthew's Church. South Carolina. 

Nov. 16. 1S43, South Carolina Synod. 
Luther Chapel, North Carolina. Aug. 

28, 1858, North Carolina Synod. 
Salem Church, North Carolina, May 29. 

1850, North Carolina Synod. 
Charleston, S. C, May 15, 1853. South 

Carolina Synod. 



Baden, Germany, Oct. 2, 1839. 
Dayton, Ohio, April 17, 1849... 



Louis A. Bikle, D. D. . . . St. Mark's. Charlotte. May 28, 1859, 
North Carolina Synod. 

Alexander Phillippi.D.D St. Mark's, Charlotte, May 28, 1859, 
North Carolina Synod. 



Organ Church, May 4. 1862, North Caro- 
lina Synod. 

Wytheville, Va., Aug., 1861. Southwest- 
ern Virginia Syni id. 



TABULATED SKETCH OF MINISTERS CONNECTED WITH THE SYNOD. 



169 



56 



Admitted to 

North Carolina 

Synod, Whence, 

When. 



Removed, How, 
When. 



Age. 

Yrs.Mos.Dys. 



Buried. Remarks. 



South Carolina Synod, 

May 30, 1837. 
South Carolina Synod, 

May 30, 1837. 
South Carolina Synod, 

April 23, 1839. 



Honorably dismissed 

May 29, 1855. 
Died Sept. 9, 1870 75 



Died I .. 

Died .. 

Died June 30, 1S77 ' 66 

Died June 3, 1866 70 



One of the organizers 

of Southwestern Vir-I 

ginia Synod. 
South Carolina Synod, IDied. 

Sept. 24, 1841. 
South Carolina Synod, Died. 

Sept. 24, 1841. 



Methodist Church, 
May 6, 1S44. 



Died March 16, 1864. 



Died Nov. 20, iS 



Dropped Nov. 12, 1850, 
by South Carolina 
Synod. 
Expelled by North Caro- 
| Una Synod, May 1, T852. 

Expelled by North Caro- 

1 Una Synod. May 4, 1853. 
Southwestern Virginia To Southern Illinois 

Synod, May 1, 1851. 1 Synod, 1873. 
Died Aug. 12,188=; 



72 - Died July n, 1876 ' 

73 Pennsylvania Minis- Ministerium of Pennsyl-' 
terium, 18s;. vania, 1S61. 



74 South Carolina Synod. Died Feb. iS, 1871 
Died July 19, 1864. 



75 From Methodist 
Church. 

76 South Carolina Synod, Joined the Methodists in 

May 2, 1856. I 1859. 

77 Died Sept. 30, 1863. 



79 South Carolina Synod, 
April 29, 1858. 



46 



81 Evansville, Ind., April Died Oct. 26, 1876 62 

28, 1859. 

82 Salem, Va., April 28, Died Jan. 14, 1874 54 

1859. 

83 I o 1 ennessee Synod, 

1885. 



Shady Grove, N. C. 

Dansville, N. Y. 

1 
Texas. 

Burke's Garden,Va. 

Charlotte, N. C. 



Organ Church Killed going from 

church by a fall from 
his horse. 

Mt. Pleasant, N. C. 



Concord, N. C Transferred to Mary- 
land Synod, Sept. 8 
1866. 

Frieden's Church, 
Gibsonville, N.C. 



Organ Church, 

North Carolina. 
Lau's Church. 



First principal of W. 
Ca. Male Academy at 
Mt. Pleasant, N. C. 



Ancram, N. Y Transferred to South 

Carolina Synod, Jan.. 

0, i860. 
Gardenville, Md . . . First pastor of St. 

Paul's, Wilmington. 
Savannah, Ga First President of North 

Carolina College. 

Moved to Virginia. 



170 



HISTORY OF NORTH CAROLINA SYNOD. 



Names of Ministers. 



James R. Sikes 

Whitson Kimball... 
James D. Stingley. . 
Martin M. Miller... . 
George F. Schaefer . 

\V. H. Cone 

J. W. Barrier 

A. D. L. Moser 

L. W. Heydenreich. 



Licensed, Where, When, 

b\ Whom. 



Sandy Creek, N. C, May 7, i860, North 
Carolina Synod. 

Sandy Creek Church, May 5, i860, 
North Carolina Synod. 

Charleston, Nov. 18, 1846, South Caro- 
lina Synod. 

St. Mark's Church, Charlotte, May 2, 
1863, North Carolina Synod. 

Organ Church, May 4, 1862, North Caro- 
lina Synod. 

Ad interim, May, 1S58 

Organ Church, July 4, 1866, Conference 

of North Carolina Synod. 
Bethlehem Church, Oct. 19, 1863, South 

Carolina Synod. 



Ordained, Where, When, 
by Whom. 



Frieden's Church, Aug. 5, 1861, North 
Carolina Synod. 

Organ Church, May 4, 1862, North Car- 
olina Synod. 

St. Andrew's Church, Nov. 14, 1849, South 
Carolina Synod. 

Was never ordained 



Hollidaysburg, Pa., Sept., 1865, by Alle- 
ghany Synod. 

Salem, Va., Aug., 1858, Southwestern Vir- 
ginia Synod. 

Was never ordained j 

St. Mark's, Edgefield, Oct. 22, 1866, South 
Carolina Synod. 



94 Charles H. Bernheim . . . I ethlehem Church, Nov. 13, 1855, South 
Carolina Synod. 

95 J. H. Fesperman Lau's Church, May 2, 1868, by North 

Carolina Synod. 

96 R. L. Brown Lau's Church, May 2, 1868, North Car- 
olina Synod. 

W. R. Ketchie Lau's Church, May 2, 1868, North Car- 
olina Synod. 
J. D. Bowles Jan., 1861, South Carolina Synod 



97 



Pine Grove Church, Oct. 31, 1858, South 
Carolina Synod. 

Salem Church, Oct. 15, 1871, North Car- 
olina Synod. 

Salem Church, Oct. 15, 1871, North Car- 
olina Synod. 

Salem Church, Oct. 15, 1871, North Car- 
olina Synod. 

Sept., 1861, Georgia Synod 



Philip M. Bikle, Ph. D. 
Jacob G. Neiffer 



Salem Church, Aug. 29, 1869, North Car- 
olina Synod. 



Organ Church, Aug. 26, 1872, North 
Carolina Synod. 



\V. E. Hubbert Washington Co., Va., 1868, by South- 
western Virginia Synod. 

102 E. P. Parker 

103 P. E. Zink 

104 H. M. Brown 

105 D. M. Henkel, D. D.... 

106 J. B. Davis, D. D 

107 J. H. Harry 

108 Calvin W. Sifferd, D. D. 

109 T. W. Dosh, D. D 



New Market, Va., Oct. 5, 1848, Tennes- 
see Synod. 
Virginia Synod 



no V. R. Stickley. Smith Co., Va., Aug., 1873, Southwest- 
ern Virginia Synod, 
in R. W. Petrea 



Floyd Co., Va., 1870, by Southwestern 
Virginia Synod. 

Frieden's Church, Sept. 29, 1872, Confer- 
ence of North Carolina Synod. 

St. Paul's Church, Rowan, May 4, 1873, 
North Carolina Synod. 

St. Paul's Church, Rowan, May 4, 1873, 
North Carolina Synod. 

New Market, Va., Sept. n, 1849, Tennes- 
see Synod. 

1S34, Virginia Synod 



Concord, July 26, 1874, North Carolina 

Synod. 
St. John's Church, Cabarrus, May 1, 1875, 

North Carolina Synod. 



112 E. A. Wingard, D. D. 



113 S. S. Rahn, D. D Ebenezer Church, Georgia, April, 1874, 

Georgia Synod. 

114 William A. Lutz ' 



115 Franklin P. Cook. 

116 J. A. Linn 



Smith Co., Va., Oct. 1875, Southwestern 

Virginia Synod. 
St. Enoch's Church, May 7, 1876, North 

Carolina Synod. 
St. Luke's Church, Newberry Co., S. C, 

1875, South Carolina Synod. 
Mt. Pilgrim Church, Nov. 1, 1874, Georgia 

Synod. . 
St. Peter's Church, May 5, 1877, North 

Carolina Synod. • 
St. Peter's Church, May 5, 1877, North 

Carolina Synod. 
St. Peter's Church, May 5, 1877, North 

Carolina Synod. 



TABULATED SKETCH OF MINISTERS CONNECTED WITH THE SYNOD. 



171 



Admitted to 

North Carolina 

Synod, Whence, 

When. 



Removed, How, 
When. 



Age. 
Yrs.Mos.Dys. 



Remarks. 



Died Jan. 21, i£ 



62 9 23 Gibsonville, N. C. 



90 



Died May 23, 1898 70 1 25 

Mississippi Synod, May Died. 

2, 1861. 
Killed in battle June 7, 30 8 19 

1864. 
Pittsburgh Synod, 1882. 

Virginia Synod, May 



Lutheran Chapel. A very useful minister. 



Eethel Church, Ro- 
wan Co., N. C. 



3, it 



ji Died July 20, 1867 26 10 5 St. John's, Cabar- 

I rus Co. 

South Carolina Synod, Died Tuly 26, 1893 56 10 24 I Charlotte, N. C. 

May 2. 1867. 

East Pennsylvania Died March 18, 1879 73 8 24 Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Svnod, April 30, 



South Carolina Svnod, Died Jan. 20, 1901 
April 30, 1868. 



Georgia Synod, April To South Carolina Synod 
29, 1869. in 1874. 

To Maryland Synod, July 

13, 1S70. 

Virginia Synod, Aug. To District Synod of 1 

25. 1870. Ohio, Sept. 24, 1875. ! 

Southwestern Virginia To Southwestern Vir-' 

Synod, Aug. 23, 1871. ginia Synod, April 7,1 

1877. 



103 Died Dec. 23, 1892. 

104 

105 Virginia Synod, May To Indiana Synod, 

1, 1S73. March 3, 1876. 

106 Virginia Synod, April Died Feb. 26. 1895 

28, 1875. 
■107 

108 To Southern Illinois 

Synod, June 10, 1875. 

109 South Carolina Synod, Died Dec. 24, 1889 

May 2. 1876. 
no Southwestern Virginia 
Synod, May 2, 1876. 

in To Southern Illinois 

Synod, April 7, 1888. 

112 Smith Carolina Synod, To South Carolina 

Sept. 8, 1876. Synod, Feb. 15. 1883. 

113 South Carolina Synod, To South Carolina 

March 23, 1877. Synod, Oct., 1879. 

114 

115 To District Svnod of 

Ohio, April, 1878. 



9 14 !Near Conover 
N. C. 



o Salem, Va. 



Burkittsville. Md. 



172 HISTORY OF NORTH CAROLINA SYNOD. 



_- .. Licensed, '\Yheke, "When. Ohdaixed, Where, When 

Names of Ministers. by Whom. by Whom. 



W. J. Smith Frieden's Church, May 5, 1878, North 

Carolina Synod. 



118 
119 



B. S. Brown Frieden's Church, May 5, 1878, North 

Carolina Synod. 

D. J. Koontz (colored) Mt. Pleasant, May 1, 1880, North Carolina 

Synod. 
S. T. Hallman, D. D.... St. Paul's Church, Newberry Co., Oct. Walhalla, S. C, Oct. 17, 1869, South Caro- 

19, 1868, South Carolina Synod. Una Synod. 

J. D. Shirey, D. D Oct. 30, i860, Virginia Synod Augusta Co., Va., Oct. 20, 1861, by Vir- 
ginia Synod. 

122F.W F. Peschau, D. D. Apollo, Pa., fall of 1873, Pittsburgh By Pittsburgh Synod, 1876 

I Synod. 
123'j. L. Buck 1877, by Southwestern Virginia Synod. Smyth Co., Va., Aug. 25, 1878, by South- 
western Virginia Synod. 

124 Thomas H. Strohecker. . Pottstown, Pa., 1879, by Ministerium of 

Pennsylvania. 
125JT. S. Brown Washington, D. C, Oct., 18S1, by Clover Hollow, Va., Aug., 1882, by South- 
Maryland Synod. j western Virginia Synod. 

126 Nathan Clapp (colored) . 1884, North Carolina Synod 



127 Samuel Holt (colored) 1884, North Carolina Synod 

128 J. M. Hedrick 

129 C. A. Rose Clover Hollow. Va., Aug., 1881, South- 

western Virginia Synod. 

130 J. C. F. Rupp 

lai W. Stoudenmire ' 

; 

132 J. W. Strickler May 20, 1882, Southwestern Virginia Clover Hollow, Giles Co., Va., Aug. 27, 

Synod. 1882, by Southwestern Virginia Synod. 

133' W. G. Campbell Madison, Va., April, 1877, Southwestern Augusta Co., Va., Aug., 1877, by Virginia' 

Virginia Synod. Synod. 

134 VV. R. Brown Easton, Pa., June 22, 1886, by Ministerium 

of Pennsylvania. 

135 H. A. Trexler Easton, Pa., June 22, 1886, by Ministerium 

of Pennsylvania. 

136JC. B. King St. John's Church, Wythe Co., Va., St. Michael's Church. Iredell, May 3, 1887, 

1885, Southwestern Virginia Synod. North Carolina Synod. 

137 George H. Cox, D. D Holston Synod, Sept. 25, 1872. 

138 J. G. Schaidt : Pennsylvania Ministerium, 1875. 

139'B. W. Cronk Botetourt Co., Va., Aug., 18S4, by Salem, Va., Aug., 1885, by Southwestern 

Southwestern Virginia Synod. Virginia Synod. 

140 D. W. Michael .' Sandy Creek Church, July 10, 1887, North 

Carolina Synod. 

141 S. L. Keller Philadelphia, Pa., June 7, 1887, by Minis- 

terium of Pennsylvania. 

142 C. B. Miller Concordia Church, Sept. 17, 1887, North 

Carolina Synod. 

143 J. H. Wyse Lancaster, Pa., June, 1888, by Ministerium 

of Pennsylvania. 

144 C. A. Brown Salisbury, Aug. 29, 1889, North Carolina 

Synod'. 

145 C. A. Marks 1876, by Virginia Synod Giles Co., Va.. Aug., 1877, by Southwest- 

ern Virginia Synod. 

146 H. C. Haithcox, D. D Danville. Pa., June 16, 1873, Susquehanna 

Synod. 

147 J. Q. Wertz : Orangeburg, S. C., Oct., 1881, South Caro-| 

Una Synod. 



TABULATED SKETCH OF MINISTERS CONNECTED WITH THE SYNOD. 



T 73 



~ 


Admitted to 




Age. 






a 


North Carolina 


Removed, How, 




a 
S 


Synod, Whence, 


When. 


Buried. 

Yrs.Mos. Dys. 


Remarks. 


3 


When. 








£ 










117 




To Southwestern Vir- 
ginia Synod, March 20, 












1883. 




Il8 






First President of Al- 








pha Synod. 


I20 


South Carolina Synod. To South Carolina 
May 29, 1880. Synod, Oct. 22, 1883. 






121 


South Carolina Synod, Died April 5, 1896 S9 n 20 Mt. Pleasant, N. C. 

May 2, 1883. 




122 


Middle Tennessee To Pittsburgh Svnod. 








Synod, May 3, 1882.! April 18, 1893. 








123 Southwestern Virginia To Southwestern Vir- 








i Synod, May 3, 1882. 1 ginia Synod, 1889. 








124 Pennsylvania Minis- 








terium, May 3, 1882. 








125 Southwestern Virginia To Southwestern Vir- 






Synod, May 2, 1883. ginia Synod, April 19, 






1892. 












Synod, May 8, 1889. 












| Synod, May 8, 1889. 






128 Virginia Synod, Aug. Died Feb. 17, 1895 50 Charlotteville, Va. 




16, 1884. 




129 Southwestern Virginia Died Julv 2, 1899 42 3 ^1 Lutheran Chapel, 




Synod, July 9, 1884. N. C. 




130 Pittsburgh Synod, Moved to Ontario, Can- 






April 24, 1885. ada. 






i3i|Maryland Synod, No- Dropped May 3, 1892. 








vember 13, 1884. 








132 Southwestern VirginiaTo Southwestern Vir-! 








Synod, Dec. 18, 1885.! ginia Synod, 1890. 






I 33 


Alleghany Synod, July |To Susquehanna Synod.] 








1, 1886. July 13. 1893. 




J 34 


Pennsylvania Minis- To Southwestern Vir- 
terium, Aug. 10, 1886. ginia Synod, Dec. 20, 
" 8 93- 






*35 


Pennsylvania Minis- 
terium, Sept. 21, 1886. 






136 






President of Elizabeth 
Female College at 














Charlotte. 


137 Holston Synod, Dec. 








10, 1887. 








138 Holston Synod, May To Tennessee Synod, 








3, 1888. ' 1890. 








139 Southwestern Virginia To South Carolina 






Synod, May 31, 1887. Synod, March 19, 1894. 






140 To Virginia Synod, Dec. 






..,,.. L 3 ' lS95 - i 






141 Pennsylvania Minis- To South Carolina] 






terium, Feb. 1, 1888.! Synod, 1890. 






J 142 ' 






143 Pennsylvania Minis- To South Carolina! 






terium, Nov. 26, 1888. Synod, 1890. 






144 






145 South Carolina Synod, .To Virginia Synod, Feb. 






May 2. 1890. 17, 1896. 






: 146 East Ohio Synod, May 


To Northern Illinois 








| 2, 1890. 


Synod, Dec. 9, 1890. 








1147 South Carolina Synod, 










1 
; 


May 2, 1890. 











174 



HISTORY OF NORTH CAROLINA SYNOD. 



Names of Ministers. 



Licensed, Where, When, 

by Whom. 



Ordained, Where, When, 
by Whom. 



C. L. T. Fisher Taneytown, Md., 1884, Maryland Baltimore, fall of 1885, Maryland Synod.. 

Synod. 

W. P. Phifer (colored) . . Licentiate of Maryland Synod Charlotte, April 28, 1890, North Carolina 

Synod. 

W. S. Bowman, D. D. .. Martinsburg, Va., Dec. 3, 1853, Virginia Woodstock, Va., Oct. 20, 1856, Virginia 

Synod. Synod. 
Peter Miller New Market, Va., Oct. 26, 1858, by Oct. 22, i860, by Virginia Synod 

Virginia Synod. 

152 C. C. Lyerly March, 1881, Southern Illinois Synod.. . ; St. John's Church, Illinois. 1886, by South 

em Illinois Synod. 

153 W. A. Deaton St. Enoch's Church, May 3, 1891, North 

Carolina Synod. 

M . Wolf 



!55 
156 
*57 
158 

J 59 
160 

161 
162 

163 



H. M. Petrea. 



St. Paul's Church, Rowan, May 3, 1892, 

North Carolina Synod. 

J. H. C. Fisher Martinsburg, W. Va., Oct. 7,1889, by Washington, D. C, Oct. 9, 1890, Maryland 

Maryland Synod. ; Synod. 

W. P. Huddle jSalem, Va.. Aug. 25, 1885, by South- Pembroke, Va., Aug. 19, Southwestern 

western Virginia Synod. 1 Virginia Synod. 

R. L. Bame Lutheran (. hapel, May 5,. 1893, North 

Carolina Synod. 

W. H. Stutts Lutheran Chapel, May 5, 1893, North 

Carolina Synod. 

Karl Boldt Oswego, N. Y., Sept. 9, 1889, by Red Hook, N. Y., Sept. 28, 1890, by 

Synod of New York and Newj Synod of NewYork and New Jersey. 
I Jersey. 
M. G. G. Scherer New Market, Va., Oct. 1, 18S2, by Vir- Waynesboro, Va., Oct. 14, 1883, by Vir- 
ginia Synod, ginia Synod. 

B. H. W. Runge St. Paul's Church, Wilmington, June 2, 

1895. 
H. E. H. Sloop Bethel Church, Rowan, Aug. 23, 1894. . . . 



164 V. Y. Boozer .. 

1651H. W. Jeffcoat. 



J. D. Shealy 

P. H. E. Derrick ... 
H.N. Miller, Ph.D. 



Bethel Church, Rowan, Aug. 23, 1894. 

Bethel Church, Rowan, Aug. 23, 1894... . 

Union Church, Lexington Co., S. C, 
1891, by SoUih Carolina Synod. 



Baltimore, Md., Oct. 5, 1893, by Mary- Frostburg, Md., Oct. n, 1894, by Mary- 
1 land Synod. land Synod. 

169 H. A. McCullough St. Michael's Church, Lexington Co., S. 

C, Oct. 27, 1895, South Carolina Synod. 

170 L. E. Busby, D. D 



171 S. D. Steffey ISalem, Va., Aug., 1889, by Southwest- Burke's Garden.Va., Aug., 1892, by South- 

I ern Virginia Synod. western Virginia Synod. 

I72|W. B. Oney Burke's Garden.Va., Aug., 1881, South- Clover Hollow, Va., Aug., 1882, South- 

J western Virginia Synod. western Virginia Synod. 

C. L. Miller , Burlington, May 1, 1898, North Carolina 

Synod. 

Burlington, May 1, 1898, North Carolina 

Synod. 

Organ Church, July 6, 1898, North Carolina 

j Synod. 
Norristown, Pa., May 22, 1883, Pennsyl- 
vania Ministerium. 
Aurora, W. Va., Oct. 1868, by Virginia Hebron Church, Madison Co., Va., Oct., 
Synod. | 1869, Virginia Synod. 



G. A. Riser 

C. B. Cox 

A. G. Voigt, D. D. 



177 R. C. Holland, D. D.... 



TABULATED SKETCH OF MINISTERS CONNECTED WITH THE SYNOD. 



J 75 



Admitted to 

Nokth Carolina 

Synod, Whence, 

When. 



Removed, How, 
When. 



Age. 
Yrs.Mos. Dys. 



Nebraska Synod, May 
2, i8go. 



One of the organizers of 
the Alpha Synod, May 



i5o|Georgia Synod, May i, Died March 26, 1900 

1891. 
I5 1 "' 



Virginia Synod, Oct. 
30, 1890. 

Southern Illinois 
Synod, June 6, 1890. 



154 New York and New 
Jersey Synod, June 
28, 1890. 



To Southwestern Vir- 
ginia Synod, Jan. 15, 
1894. 

To Central and Southern 
Illinois Synod, Dec. 7, 
1897. 

To South Carolina 
Synod, Sept. 28, 1891. 

Died March 5, 1899 



155 



156 Maryland Synod, 
March 24, 1892. 
Southwestern Virginia 
Synod, May 2, 1893. 



To Alleghany Synod,! 
Aug. 29, 1893. 



1S8 



160 South Carolina Synod, 
May 3, 1894. 



West Pennsylvania 
Synod, May 3, 1894. 



161 
162 

'63 
164 

f 65 
1 166 

167 



To Virginia Synod, 

March 24, 1897. 
To Central Illinois 

Synod, Nov. 30, 

1894. 
To New York Minis-j 

terium, April 25, 1894. 
To South Carolina] 

Synod, Jan. 19, 1898. I 

To South Carolina! 
Synod, Sept. 5, 1899. ! 
Died June 15, 1895 31 



To Georgia Synod, Oct. 
6, 1896. 



South Carolina Synod, 

Nov. 27, 1894. 
Georgia Svnod, July 6, 

1895- 
Maryland Synod, Sept. 

30, 1895. 
South Carolina Synod, 

April 17, 1896. 
South Carolina Synod, 

May 4, 1896. 
Southwestern Virginia 

Synod, June 10, 1896. 
Southwestern Virginia 

Synod, March 9, 1897. 



To South Carolina 
Synod, Dec. 3. 1895. 

To South Carolina 
Synod, Jan. 19, 1899. 

To South Carolina 
Synod, Aug. 11, 1898. 



South Carolina Synod 

June 17, 1898. 
South Carolina Synod 

June 30, 1898. 



To Virginia Synod, 

April 20, 1900. 
To Tennessee Synod, 

May 18, 1898. 
To Virginia Synod, Oct. 

16, 1899. 
To Holston Synod, 

March 11, 1901. 



Buried. 



7 23 Charleston, S. C. 



Poplar Mount, N.C. 



Wilmington, N. C. 



Remarks. 



176 



HISTORY OF NORTH CAROLINA SYNOD. 



Names of Ministers. 



178, 
J 79 



185 



P. L. Miller 

P. J. Wade 

E. W.Leslie 

R. A. Helms 

W. W. J. Ritchie. 

E. L. Folk 

J.P.Miller 



Licensed, Where, When, 
by Whom. 



Lebanon, Va., Aug. 23, 1891, Virginia 

Synod. 
Ceres, Va., Aug., 1889, by Southwestern 

Virginia Synod. 

East Radford, Va., Aug., 1896, by 
Southwestern Virginia Synod. 



Ordained, Where, When, 
uy Whom. 



New Market, Va., Aug. 25, 1895, by Vir 
ginia Synod. 

St. Peter's Church, West Virginia, Oct., 
1891, by Potomac Conference of the Vir- 
ginia Synod. 

Rural Retreat, Va., Aug. 19, 1898, by 
Southwestern Virginia Synod. 

Augusta Co., Va., Aug. 23, 1896, by Vir- 
ginia Synod. 

Newberry Co., S. C, Oct. 19, 1899, by 
South Carolina Synod. 
Botetourt Co., Va., May, 1885, by Salem, Va., Aug. 1885, by Southwestern 



Southwestern Virginia Synod. 



W. A. Button Rural Retreat, Va., 1893, by South- 
western Virginia Synod. 
C. R. W. Kegley 



Virginia Synod. 

Holly Grove, N. C, 1889, by Tennessee 
Synod. 

Blueridge Springs, Va., 1897, by South- 
western Virginia Synod. 

Salem, Va., Aug. 18, 1901, by Southwest- 
ern Virginia Synod. 



TABULATED SKETCH OF MINISTERS CONNECTED WITH THE SYNOD. 



177 





Admitted to 








North Carolina Removed, How, 


Age. 






H 


Synod, Whence, When. 




Buried. 


Remarks. 


a 


When. 




Yrs.Mos.Dys. 






Z 












178 


Ohio Synod, July 22, 
1898. 


To Wittenberg Synod, 
March 19, 1901. 








179 


Southwestern Virginia 
Synod, Sept. 15, 1898. 










180 


Southwestern Virginia 
Synod, April 8, 1899. 










181 


Virginia Synod, July 
11, 1899. 










182 


South Carolina Synod, 








* 




Dec. 7, 1899. 








183 


Virginia Synod, Jan. 
26, 1901. 










184 


TennesseeSynod, Dec. 
23, 1900. 








185 


Southwestern Virginia 
Synod, May 19, 1900. 








186 


Southwestern Virginia 
Synod, Aug. 18, 1901.I 









CHAPTER XVII. 

THE GROWTH OF THE SYNOD IN THE NUMBER OF ITS MINISTERS. 



A. D. 



803 
803 
804 
806 
809 
8lO 
8ll 
8l2 

813 
814 

815 
816 

817 
819 

820 
821 
822 
823 
824 
825 
826 
827 
828 
829 
830 

831 

832 

833 
834 
835 
836 

837 
838 

839 

840 



843 
844 

845 
846 
847 



850 



Minis- 
ters. 



6 

6 

8 

9 

9 

9 

9 

10 

11 

11 

10 

1 1 

1 1 

8 

6 

7 

7 

8 

10 

12 

15 

7 

7 



7 
10 

9 
9 



Candi- 
dates. 



5 
6 
6 

5 
11 

7 
9 
9 
5 
5 
4 
4 



Cate- 

chets. 



Licen- 
tiates. 



Total. 



5 
7 
7 
7 

11 
12 
14 
17 
22 

2 3 
25 
25 
26 
22 
20 
20 

19 
11 
10 
15 
15 
15 
16 

19 
19 
12 
11 
11 
11 
15 
13 
13 
13 
16 

14 
10 

11 
1 1 
1 1 
1 1 
12 
12 
12 
12 



Remarks. 



Convention organized. 



No change reported. 
No change reported. 



Tennessee Synod was formed. 



South Carolina Synod organized. 



Minutes very incomplete. 
Catechets no longer admitted. 



Synod of [Southwestern Vir- 
1 ginia was formed. 



(178) 



GROWTH OF SYNOD IN NUMBER OF ITS MINISTERS. 



179 



A. D. 


Minis- 
ters. 


Candi- 
dates. 


Cate- 

chets. 


Licen- 
tiates. 


Total. 


Remarks. 


1851 
1852 

1853 
1854 


8 
10 
10 
10 






6 
4 
3 
3 
3 
5 
4 


14 
14 
13 
13 
15 
17 
17 






















1855 12 
1S56 | 12 

1857 1 13 

1858 i 13 
1S59 j 16 
i860 j 18 
























5 18 
5 21 
5 23 
5 23 

4 2X 
















1861 | 18 








1862 19 








1S63 ! 21 






I 

2 
I 
I 
2 
3 

3 
3 
3 


22 
18 

15 

18 
16 

19 

22 
18 

17 
18 
20 

19 
22 

19 

23 
23 
23 
23 
24 
27 

29 
25 
29 




1864 1 16 








1865 ! 14 








1866 : 17 








1867 : 14 








1868 i 16 








1869 j 19 








1870 15 

1871 ' 14 














1872 18 






The licensure system abolished. 


1873 ! 20 










1874 ■ 19 










1875 ' 22 










1876 19 

1877 1 23 


















1878 23 

1879 j 23 

1880 23 

1881 ' 24 










. . . . 














Colored ministers admitted. 










1882 > 27 










1883 29 










1884 25 

1885 29 


















1886 28 










1887 ' 30 












1888 35 

1889 32 





















Colored ministers formed the 


1890 34 

1891 36 

1892 ; 37 

1893 1 38 
J894 32 
!895 i 35 

1896 : 34 

1897 ! 34 

1898 36 










Alpha Synod. 


















































































1899 i 39 

1900 J 34 

1901 1 35 




















Heavy losses by death and re- 
movals. 












CHAPTER XVIII. 

A SUMMARY OF PAROCHIAL REPORTS. 









Bap 


tisms, 


, I 










0) 




u 

3 
J3 


'S 
3 a! 

IS 


"3 

-a 


<J5 


s «■ '« 

u c .° 

O " T 


c 

> 3 


>-1 < 

rt 2 J- 


5 1-. 

' "5 


Remarks. 


> 


CJ 


u 


<! 


— ^- 


u < 


! fa 


Si f- 


< 02 




l80 3 






No report. 


l8lO 


27 


















First published list of 
congregations. 


l8l2 


36 




13 


414 


141 . 










First report. 


I8I3 






28 


768 


266 . 












l8l4 






16 


868 


266 . 


. 22 










I8I5 






22 


473 


133 • 


■ 36 










l8l6 






87 


924 


454 ■ 


. 80 










1817 






67 


1060 


442 . 


. 62 


5 • 








1819 






67 


975 


5i8. 


■ 94 








54 slaves baptized. 


1820 






83 


1019 


446 . 


• 75 








40 slaves baptized. 


1821 






39 


578 


189 . 


. 107 








7 slaves and 1 Indian 
baptized. 


1822 






11 


606 


237 • 


. 122 








1 1 slaves baptized. 


1823 






13 


434 


220 . 


. 72 










1824 






6 


312 


112 . 


• 50 








3 slaves baptized. 


1825 


24 


1335 


14 


461 


223 • 


. 80 










1826 


37 


1393 


11 


453 


I49l. 


. 120 










1827 


34 


1509 


35 


613 


198!. 


. 128 










1828 


39 


1927 


26 


667 


245 • 


. 126 










1829 


40 


1794 


36 


492 


357 • 


. 122 










1830 


45 


1888 


29 


636 


264 . 


• 98 


r 3 - 


. : 


250 




1831 


33 


1732 


13 


493 


217 . 


• 94 


14 ■ 








1832 




















No report. 


1833 




1994 


2 


441 


144 • 


■ 7i 


2 . 


• 7i 




1S34 


24 


1 62 1 


18 


387 


233 • 


• 7i 


6 . 


• 7i 




1835 


2 3 


1572 


19 


321 


155. 


■ 75 


13 • 






1836 


19 


1789 


11 


289 


"3 • 


• 40 


16 ( 


>8 440 




1837 


26 


1759 


8 


356 


213 1. 


• 7i 


10 5 


!2 605 




183S 


36 


2024 


17 


321 


223 . 


• 77 


12 


6 465 


25 received by letter. 


1839 


22 


1641 


11 


322 


190I. 


• 46 


h 1 ; 


51 655 47 received by letter. 


1840 


37 


1886 


1 


361 


176;. 


• 98 


10 J 


;6 450 2 received by letter. 


1 841 


35 


2343 


5 


344 


130- 


. 120 


11 - 


;7 543 4 received by letter. 


1842 


23 


1929 


11 


273 


169. 


• 83 


7 i 


5 345 9 received by letter. 




















S.W.Va. Synod formed. 


1843 


17 


1463 




93 


56. 


• 76 


4 i 


2 85 


17 received by letter. 


1844 


21 


1882 


9 


185 

238 


87 • 


. 122 


3 




ia received bv letter. 


1845 


17 


2093 


20 


316 . 


• 158 


3 5 


;8 152 27 received by letter. 


1846 


21 


2272 


n 


205 


161 . 


■ 154 


5 : 


55 I96 j 12 received by letter. 


1847 


24 


20S2 


23 


229 


174 ] 


2 97 


4 






184S 


30 


2523 


26 


236 


217 . 


. 129 


7 


9 60 


20 received by letter. 


1849 


2 3 


2215 


22 


264 


199 s 


7 59 


2 . 


. 80 




1850 


26 


2482 


39 


294 


281 - 


6 68 


5 ■ 


201 




1851 


35 


2472 


18 


264 


161 


7 5i 


6 . 













(180) 



SUMMARY OF PAROCHIAL REPORTS. 



181 







.. 


Bapt 


isms. 


t 


c 












-c 


2 

3 0) 




m . 




_o 


"3 


•£§ 


1 i 


Remarks. 




3 


H 


"3 




c.2 


6 


1- 

a; 
c 


J-g 


% ! ° 

QJ -^ 




V 


J3 


<-> 


T3 




- 


•a 


3 


§00 








> 


U 


u 


< 


« 


U 


< 


fa 


Cfi 


H 


_J?_ 


• 


1852 


28 


2587 


41 


200 


196 


39 


77 


10 


25 


160 




1853 


25 


2513 


41 


229 


251 


26 


61 


4 


II 


90 




1854 
1855 


29 
26 


2812 


30 
39 


239 
176 


162 


16 


69 

96 


4 








2697 


212 


25 


10 


20 


163 




1856 


25 


2682 


3 1 


200 


IO4 


32 


"5 


10 


37 


335 




1857 


28 


2620 


29 


!3! 


189 


5o 


96 


13 


40 


45i 




1858 


32 


3360 


92 


265 


246 


80 


i37 


18 


5° 


380 




1859 


24 


3171 


68 


233 


414 


58 


117 


26 


120 


799 




i860 


38 


3942 


65 


253 


114 


5° 


102 


29 


80 


595 




l86l 


39 


4083 


60 


3d 


258 


49 


97 


33 


170 


1221 




1862 


38 


4250 


73 


332 


318 


4i 


162 


21 


97 


644 




1863 


38 


4055 


26 


251 


96 


26 


317 


23 


"3 


677 




1864 


37 


4110 


59 


I 7 S 


315 


42 


226 


12 


7i 


416 




1865 






















Few ministers present. 






















No report. 


1866 


32 


3109 


75 


159 


2IO 


16 


222 


11 


33 


250 




1867 


32 


3471 


63 


139 


200 


34 


53 


11 


88 


752 




1868 


33 


3351 


37 


I 9 I 


l6l 


140 


68 


20 


119 


782 




I869 


33 


3903 


72 


173 


I 7 8 


5o 


73 


15 


92' 725 




I87O 


39 


4201 


97 


299 


254 


77 


85 


28 


188 1576 




187I 


3i 


3555 


35 


253 


153 


109 


105 


23 


177 1335 


■ 


1872 


40 


4266 


44 


220 


I50 


62 


78 


23 


152115° 




1873 


36 


3843 


23 


137 


115 


60 


82 


14 


119; 809 




1874 4I ,4201 


28 


238 


l62 


80 


101 


24 


169 1345 




1875 37 


4131 


62 


283 


379 


145 


100 


24 


167,1211 




1876 35 


3320 


5o 


251 


1 S3 


55 


96 


26 


198 1380 




1877 


4i 


4170 


33 


297 


213 


91 


139 


28 


218 


1684 




IS78 


43 


4508 


38 


322 


212 


70 


!34 


30 


266 


1884 




1879 


44 


4806 


77 


377 


3i5 


63 


131 


35 


320 


2559 




l88o 


48 


4689 


36 


386 


190 


64 


123 


32 


267 


1872 




l88l 


5o 


4823 


29 


294 


223 


124 


106 


29 


279 


1875 




1882 


55 


4833 


29 


324 


176 


72 


98 


28 


267 


1 741 




1883 


56 


4670 


45 


359 


322 


93 


114 




313 


2708 




1884 


47 


4H5 


3i 


381 


217 


84 


106 




339 


2784 




I8S5 


44 


4108 


18 


3i5 


204 


74 


112 




233 


2149 




1886 


5o 


4150 


25 


343 


287 


86 


133 




107 


2596 




1887 


49 


4613 


46 


3i8 


293 


140 


146 


.... 


283 


320S 




1888 


5i 


4524 


62 


3S8 


258 


102 


153 




348 


3640 




1889 


53 


6310 


36 


343 


294 


133 


55 


44 


536 


346i 




189O 


54 


6162 


44 


332 


306 


89 


77 


55 


429 


5757 




189I 


52 


6519 


47 


415 


307 


109 


78 


5o 


600 


4902 




1892 


53 


6908 


21 


368 


329 


121 


87 


5° 


627 


4947 




1893 53J 


6844 


49 


434 


274 


136 


72 


49 


602 


479i 




1894 


52i 


7116 


4i 


269 


378 


109 


86 


56 


663 


4S34 




1895 


57 


7077 


3i 


303 


326 


204 


67 


52 


660 


5125 




1896 


62 


7087 


39 


330 


278 


152 


102 


57 


691 


5262 




1897 


60 


7136 


29 


35i 


219 


"5 


99 


58 


680 


5314 




1898 


53 


6392 


37 


297 


277 


129 


89 


54 


643 


5290 




1899 


60 


7347 


J 3 


353 


283 


141 


78 


59 


903 


5705 




I9OO 


62 


8167 


40 


415 


256 


209 


118 


54 


637 


5244 




I9OI 


58 


8i73 


17 


352 


296 


168 


90 


50 


664 


5469 





CHAPTER XIX. 

A SUMMARY OF FINANCIAL REPORTS. 



Date. 


a 

-a 

c 
>. 
in 


a 


3 

-a 
a 

CD 
_0 

§i 

W 




c 

u 

3 

-a 
W 


c 


bjo 


4J 

V 



> 
c 

n 


3 

H 


Remarks. 


j;8ii 


#43 4° 
53 20 
27 05 
41 01 
40 85 
39 9° 
47 7° 


#7° 44 










$113 84 
53 20 
173 75 
41 01 
40 85 
39 9° 
47 7° 




1812 












1813 

1814 

1815 

1816 


146 70 














::::::: 








































1817 

1818 


























No Synod held. 


1819 


234 12 
51 00 
49 10 

58 60 
70 66 
47 45 
25 94 
62 01 

62 19 

85 °7 
96 17 

59 78 

63 06 
41 52 
39 92 

45 °6 

46 84 

47 21 
94 24 








#246 75 






480 87 
51 00 
49 1° 
58 60 
70 66 
93 °5 
25 94 
62 01 

62 19 
85 07 
96 17 
74 03 

152 65 
41 52 
56 09 
76 00 

63 84 
58 71 

6 55 94 
311 46 

378 75 
34° 8 5 

256 39 
105 75 

99 10 

257 lr 
235 24 

131 96 
157 82 

132 63 
^3 73 
189 19 
132 25 
208 90 
197 52 
187 40 
487 86 
558 38 
860 64 














r82i 
















1822 
















1823 

1824 

1825 

1826 
















45 60 








































1827 

1828 






























1829 

1830 

1831 

1832 

1833 

1834 

*8 3 5 

1836 

1837 

1838 

1839 

1840 
1841 

1842 

1843 

1844 

1845 

r8 4 6 

1847 

1848 

*849 

1850 . 
















14 25 
89 59 






































16 17 

3° 94 

17 00 
n 50 
31 00 

* 



















































53° 7° 
237 00 

224 45 
163 50 
125 00 
21 52 
31 90 
174 75 
155 21 
39 °° 
28 50 
11 83 
56 5° 


















69 87! 84 43 
66 50 no 85 
































48 74 

33 17 
41 81 
58 06 


35 49 
34 03 
4° 55 










































57 28 35 68 
52 241 77 08 
42 72! 78 08 
50 49 5° 74 
52 97 136 22 

64 79 

60 09 

64 89 

88 42 




















































1851 

1852 

1853 

1854 

1855 

1856 . 


$67 46 
148 81 

73 " 
80 31 
36 19 
64 50 
67 33 



























#59 52 


$36 03 
363 25 
416 25 
695 69 


























1857 


70 62 









27 00 





* Education added. 



(182) 



SUMMARY OF FINANCIAL REPORTS. 



I8 3 



Date. 



1862. . 
1863., 
1864.. 
1865.. 



1873- 
1874. 
1875. 
1876. 
1877. 



1894 



1897. 



1900. 

IUOI . 

1902. 



5100 70 
i°5 55 



rig 99 

215 00 
572 5° 



109 18 
129 68 
79 °5 
9 2 95 
2 93 77 
400 17 

497 35 
426 19 

319 6 7 
213 59 

413 7i| 
342 93 
376 48. 
413 4o. 
417 85 
502 90 
560 52 
736 60 
367 24 
3°3 7i I 
34 2 lo: 
282 75: 
285 38 
307 60: 
3°5 9 1 
265 27 
279 65 
25 1 3 1 
246 60 
272 59 
556 38| 
449 34 
567 36 
45 1 80 
506 18 
538 18 



$15 65 



$184 89 
*43! 85 

353 15 
213 94 
3°5 49 
763 19 

t 



14 5° 
27 00 
52 00 



277 69 
506 51 
443 i 6 
753 66, 
766 16;. 
786 071 . 
651 88|. 
604 77! . 
685 62 ' . 
7M 9 1 !- 
855 15 ■ 
956 33 i • 
881 25] . 
708 61 ' 

973 32 
912 27 

653 r 3 

670 44 

585 93 



$i74 36 
73 7° 
733 29 
22 47 
136 52 
204 25 
168 00 

5°9 IO 
291 20 

429 9 1 ! 
1429 89 

113 57! 
276 18 
380 34 
33 1 54; 
556 3 6 
239 16 
146 37 
60 05 
J 35 3 6 
122 58! 
224 25 
152 61 
400 03 



122140 00 
180 00 



£i53 °° 

g'34 15 

§56 35 



#251 61 
357 25 

178 55 
695 25 
485 80 
616 20 
2627 00 



|| 18 00 

I! 334 60 

1167 5i 

338 02 

558 15 

5°4 85 



40 00 
119 00 
21 00 



467 17 
187 15 
130 22 
265 10 

57 1 47 
1226 97 
1726 13 
1451 98 
1270 68 
713 68 
1140 80 
421 54 
614 54 
356 68 
348 38 
161 15 

489 3 1 
1329 23 

1544 15 



$537 
2 3°34 

812 
1027 

911 
J594 
3199 



Remarks. 



109 
3i5 
574 



426 
359 
348 
434 
447 
55° 



Only Home Mission 
Society. 



Confederate money. 
Confederate money. 
Confederate money. 
No report. Few min- 
isters present. 



Incomplete. 
Reports mixed. 
Reports mixed. 
All objects included. 
All objects included. 
All objects included. 
All objects included. 



Missions included. 
487 10 Missions included. 
Missions included. 
Missions included. 
Missions included. 



1151 

525 
697 
1685 
1228 



1652 
2050 
3728 

2799 
2658 
2601 
2039 
2803 
1S63 
1914 
1681 
1906 
1764 
1818 
2658 



Mission only. 



f North Carolina College Endowed. 
I General Synod delegates. || General. 



J No report. 



OTHER FINANCIAL REPORTS. 

contains the report of the first Church Extension Fund collection, which has done much good, 
and is in a prosperous condition ; but as the figures are evidently reported wrong at times, they 
cannot be embodied here. State of funds in 1900, $1923.90. 

the Woman's Home and Foreign Missionary Societies were organized, which have been very 
successful in all these years, raising over $1000.00 annually at the present time. 



1 84 



HISTORY OF NORTH CAROLINA SYNOD. 



S^ >, . . 

co ** tn co c/) x c/3 en -y: c/: co c/) co co ca; c/j oo 



X 

P4 
w 

H 
Ph 




TABLE OF SYNODICAL MEETINGS. 



185 



ca ca • . . . ?f> lA >4* 

>^ ^ >-. >-. >%-t3 t3 >^ >,>-,>-, ca 



ca ca 
-a -a 



ej" gb~ oj cj' eel" 35 5 ca' ca' ca' ca "C "O "O >~.>i>^l>i>-i>~.>~.>-.>-.!^ jg >, >^ >», > 

*T-J >-ra T3 T3 T^ ^ ^ T3 T1 Tl T3 J-l«5-rtwrirfcSridCJCi^^,CjCjC3rt 

c c c s = ^ 3 s s c c 5 3 57HrHr2r2r2rsrsr2rs s ^rs^H^rs 

3 3 3 3 3 ~ rB 3 3 3 3 la 'S cS IS "Jh 'C "C "C "C 'S 'S 'C -Q >S 'C 'C "C "C 

cflcxioocoioHHt/OcflXcA) c/2c/}cofafafafa.i 1 fafafafaHh | fafafafa 



"C -B -B 

far- H 



CJ 



3 .Sx-3?=2g0 .3^5-^3^ 






,_• ., ^ CJ 






.9 o 



cj 






u r o 



Us'j 5 c CJ CJ o £ 

3 1^1 I J rl £ w I 



u -5 

»S B c ° 
3 g U 



— 3 O >^ 



'-_) 



„CJ 



o _ _ 
« 5 CJ -£ CJ o-d-a 

43 3 >. ca i-l S 

3 <u 2 -> > o 



0>^(jU B 



o > 






Zl a 3 ?o 

3 "> C CJ <-> 

O -^ "9 •• 3 ca ca _ 3 



SO 



J Z, s Eu^^ 



>- (V- cd 



3 jj J -J-" 3 3 3 3 I 3 ^ 3 u j3 &CJ a 

=g o J 6 u =3 i s ^ J "e Ji ° ^ 3 I -2 V a 



3 r ^ r^ -B 

iscjcj "■poo 



2 ■" 

3 3 



at .b -3 rj 3 _" ca , 

1 sug-jj-g' 



> S ca 
U " o ^ S 

a a ^"«< 



?= cj o r= rt 



Ph 5 



•3 I •§ « 



£ •§ £ ^-n 3 



t£ « 



:/■, 



jj c j 5 >< j 'C *j « S j .2 « « J 3 rt*j 






„ D J) 



U j= J3 



U ~s a jj 0u,"a 
a J -§ J £ u 

ca Oi ^g cfi 



•Uo "=-^ 



-^ 213 



•a tc 



O w u: -r. w fa W^ 



oj oj a ca ca 

j; -C W Hfn 
■^ cu 

u S-. ^j „ « 

CQ fa x x cfl 



X 



30 



.a ^3 _"■ _r- *r *j •> jj --j-j^o.— — c/d --~*J"o-3-a ■ -u* o o>£ ^ 

^-^^TJ «NT3«'COCCM« r; 3 S rM'^'S <" r^^-^'C in f<-) N *» — i 

yO T}-rocM m — O tJ-cim ci — ^^ J3 J__ f)N -<__u->-^-m m ' lo ^a- 

dc;KSasssc:s«claujJ'Jj , aScicJa StSc!ti as. ScS 



CO 00 












J^3^!^3^3 r a43j3 



-t- i-OO r^c/3 O O "i f) *"o "+ u~iMD t^co aO " M f^'t u-ivD r^oo OO "" <S fo >sj- in 

N M M M N f) f, ro to rl "1 el ") "I ") CO -t Tt -f t)- ^- ■+ -t rj f t "1 "1 "1 "1 "1 if) 



i86 



HISTORY OF NORTH CAROLINA SYNOD. 



>> s^ ^ 

-j "w -3-3T3-3-3-0-3-3 

■C* S. <Si [fl C/l X X X X Sfl 

..:- — — — — _^__ — 
"33333 



>, >, ^ >, >, 

R R d d d 

>^>i>-,>,>-,>,>,>, >,— ) -3-3-3-3 



-3-3-3-3-3-3-3"3 



333333333 

'- r- H H E-i r- r- r- r- r- I- ' 






= 2 



•s 3 
° CJ 



2 
J, 

o • ■ 
U22 



2 

8 2 - « 

-3 tx - H 






cjcj 
**cj 

S = 2 CJ 

3 3 „^ 

o o ►, . 






^2 
2 £'«-> 






U 

2^ 



1^3 .. 



J a a J o ,§ 



^ E 2 ~ 

3 <J £\5 



■" ^ >. >-* 



2 "3 3 '-> 



2 

3 3 3 

C C O 3 

o O CJ o 
Si) 



„CJ 



2 § 



CJ 

2 

| 2'^ 
cj £,2 



1^ J- _C ■ 




U3U1: 



-J 3 J ~ w 



CJ - = "3 - 3 
3 ~ CJ '* 

- — 2 'CJ BO 
£ 5 H - J= w . 

rt ~ -^ " -J S 
O ~ .= O « -3 



CJ' 
S « 3 

S c ? 
~ — ° 
(J i _-~ 

04 "S" -F? P4 'o "a P 3 £i -S ^ 



., v p 

Ph "3 



fa 

« CJ 









2 x — r. -J fc 



CJCJ 



"3 *$ bjQ 



6u 


u 


u 


c 


u 


r. 


WJ 


J 


„" 


■n 


— 


q 


3 






u 


" C 


-J 


— 


— 


u 


<u 


£ 


D 



CJCJ _g 



s ~ q c 



u g u 

B O S 

a a! == 
« o 

e J=" Pi 

cj a - 
8° J 

q. o O 
-:ti 



CI 



<u 



•/ ^ CQ 



- . Jj X) " J - - 



CO ■+ • ■ -CO On^ £ l^,l> ro -* u-> 



^ 00 00 - '~w~x - - ~oo 
— m jz — o m~iM j:^: ^ — 

■ N N M N S X^ „ 



■OOh 
■ t^jO CO 

CO 00 00 CO 
r-. « - 1- , 



' CO CO 
rrjOO CO 



"■uOOO t^ * . 



— 3S3Q_Q_G3rtJl.CC_ 



M biO •_ C i. 
3 3 O. a. G- 



S <l < 



1 O fC.CO O O — <N 

r^ t^ 1^ i^co co co 



TABLE OF SYNODICAL MEETINGS. 



I8 7 













^ >> >~, >~. >-. 


>-. >-.-n >n • >-. >~>T3 












d a d tf c! 


c3c3xeS>-,nicain 


>-, 


>, >, ^ 


-g ^ 


>, 


■^s a 


'3'3'3'3'a 


"3"d WO ri T3 ^3 <U 
K 5 m 3 x r 3 <" m C 


rt 


7t 71 a 


y ri 


- 


rf y .3 




— 








ta r- > 


3 3 5 3 3 












fc 


bfett, 


:- £ 


'Z 


HHhHH 


HH^Hrhh^ 



u ^ 



3U 



3 ° 3 3 >, — ' ^ £ § U 



u 



Ucj 



_u 



U O 



5 ;.2 2 ' . 
3 e -c. C ?^ >> >- 



5 a 



- 


<u 


'f\ 


u 


4h 

















(33 


.3 


: ) 













^s 


Pi 


- 


u 




u 


is 
















" 


U 














r ^ 


e 


D 




u 




O 


~. 
















D 


7. 


X 






JOJ ^ r- -£ . 3 w o ^ 3 3 — 
j- "j 5 ~ u -S -g tu 5.3 

3 O 3 -• 3 r- ^ = -£ £.3 



Utfi 1 



>-o 



5 -^ 
u ■ 



« 3 x x < 









o 



c5 6 ^ * o f i 6 2 1 £ c 

"3 *c 52 y ^ 5 "3 cj cj -3 «j 



X X X X X HXOH X X 



y 3 

3 _- 3 3 3 

S « u 1 6 6 u 

5 : o J ^ 3 bj 

O r"^ flj — O O ~ 

x x S C x x < 



-SO 



Z jr. 



ON 



Xs 



O r^ 



On 



^j r^, 4 w ^c/o c*j x: go go a^ „■ 

-00 3 00 "O CO - - /"° „ 2 O ^ 

t>_- M _- n _- o on.c 00 hj? b_r - 

^ o *_. ^ ^j w rr^ ^ J N " -j 3 _ ^ 

_ f 1 £ r^ x N _ J _^ = _J o ^"3 ^ N 

S S<SS<S<S< S < < -^ < x,^ £ s s 



o onj3 • r "_-«- 






a. o. 



00000000*000000 ON "* CN r 



X 

-i-™ i^~i — o — r^c/D cn 

On n On « On « On On On 



CHAPTER XXI. 

THE OFFICERS OF SYNOD. 



DATE. 


PRESIDENT. 


SECRETARY. 


TREASURER. 


l80 3 . 


Rev. J. G. Arndt. R< 


:v. R. J. Miller. 


No Treasurer. 


1804. 




' Paul Henkel. « 


< «i tt 


tt 1 1 


1806. 


' 


' C. A. G. Storch. ' 


1 Christoph Bernhardt. 


a tt 


1809. 


' 


< " " « 


' Ludwig Markert. 


n a 


l8lO. 




' " " < 


' Gottlieb Schober. 


a a 


I8ll. 




t it a \ t 


' Philip Henkel. 


a a 


I8I2. 




' R. J. Miller. 


' G. Schober. 


Rev. G. Schober. 


1813. 




' C. A. G. Storch. 


< tt tt 


" " " 


1814. 




' " " ' 


t a tt 




I8I5. 




' Philip Henkel. 


' Jacob Scherer. 


a n n 


I8l6. 




' C. A. G. Storch. ' 


' G. Schober. 


a a a 


1817. 


' 


t it a < 


' " " 


a << it 


1819. 




' " " ' 


' " '< 


It tt a 


l820. 


' 


< a a c 


1 a a 


tt a -a 


I82I. 


' 


' G Schober. ' 


' Jacob Scherer. 


a a a 


1822. 


1 e 


t tt < 


1 a a 


a a a 


1823. 




< C. A. G. Storch. ; ' 


i a a 


a a tt 


1S24. 




' Jacob Scherer. j ' 


' Daniel Scherer. 


" " " 


1S25. 




' G. Schober. 1 ' 


' Jacob Scherer. 


tt a a 


1826. 




t it it < 


' " " 


a a a 


1827. 




' " " < 


t a a 


a a a 


1828. 




' " " \ ' 


' John Reck. 


it tt tt 


1829. 


' 


' " " < 


t it .1 


a a a 


1830. 




etc a \ t 


t a tt 


tt a a 


I83I. 




' " " \ ' 


' Henry Graeber. 


" " " 


1832. 




' Henry Graeber. 1 ' 


' William Artz. 


Mr. Theobald Lentz. 


I833- 


' 


i a a ( 


t tt << 


tt a a 


1834. 


< 


< l£ it ■ \ I 


t a a 


Rev. S. Rothrock. 


IS35- 


' 


' Jacob Scherer. ' 


1 Henry Graeber. 


" William Artz. 


1836. 


' 


' William Artz. ' 


' " " 


Col. John Smith. 


IS37- 


' 


' Henry Graeber. j ' 


' S. Rothrock. 


Mr. Theobald Lentz. 


1838. 


' 


' William Artz. 


i it a 


" M. Barrier. 


1839. 


' 


t a a \ t 


t a a 


Col. J. Shimpoch. 


1840. 


1 ' 


' S. Rothrock. ' 


' P. A. Strobel. 


Mr.D. M. Isenhauer. 


184I. 




' H. Graeber. ' 


' T- D. Scheck. 


" A. Richard. 


1842. 




' J. D. Scheck. 


' W. G. Harter. 


It tt a 


1843. 




' William Artz. ' 


t a a 


Col. J. Shimpoch. 


1S44. 




l a a 1 


' S. Rothrock. 


a a 


1845. 


' 


' J. D. Scheck. 


< tt tt 


D. Barringer, Esq. 


1846. 


< 


' S. Rothrock. ' 


' J. B. Anthony. 


M. Barrier, Esq. 


1847. 


1 ' 


l It a < 


' J. A. Linn, Sr. 


tt a a 


1848. 




' J. B. Anthony. ' 


' W. G. Harter. 


a a a 


1849. 




' B. Arey. ' 


' J. A. Linn, Sr. 


tt a tt 


1850. 




' W. G. Harter. 1 < 


' T- Crim. 


tt it a 


I85I. 




' J. A. Linn, Sr. 1 ' 


' W. G. Harter. 


" 


1852. 




' William Artz. | ' 


' J. A. Linn, Sr. 


a a 



(188) 



OFFICERS OF SYNOD. 



DATE. 


PRESIDENT. 


SECRETARY. 


TREASURER. 


1853- 


Rev. J. A. Linn, Sr. 


Rev. L. C. Grosclose. 


M. Barrier, Esq. 


1854. 


" S. Rothrock. 


" W. G. Harter. 


tt 1 




1S55. 


" " " 


" L. C. Groseclose. 


a 1 




1856. 


" Wm. Gerhardt. 


" S. Scherer. 


it t 




1857. 


" L. C. Groseclose. 


" D. I. Dreher. 


a t 




1858. 


" J. A. Linn, Sr. 


" " " 


a 1 




i859- 


" William Artz. 


" J. S. Heilig. 


a 1 




i860. 


" S. Scherer. 


" D. I. Dreher. 


tt t 




1861. 


" J. D. Scheck. 


" G. D. Bernheim. 


1 i t 




1862. 


" D. I. Dreher. 


" J. A. Linn, Sr. 


a t 




1863. 


" G.D. Bernheim. 


" L. A. Bikle. 


Major L. G. Heilig. 


1864. 


" J. Crim. 


" J. B. Anthony. 


" " " 


1865. 


" J. B. Anthony. 


" L. A. Bikle. 


M. Barrier, Esq. 


1866. 


" S. Rothrock. 


" W. Kimball. 


Dr. P. A. Seaford. 


1867. 


" N. Aldrich. 


" W. A. Julian. 




1868. 


" L. A. Bikle. 


" N. Aldrich. 


a a a 


1869. 


" W. A. Julian. 


" L. A. Bikle. 


a it a 


1870. 


" W. Kimball. 


" C. H. Bernheim. 


tt a it 


1871. 


" S. Rothrock. 


" T. G. Neiffer. 


tt a a 


1872. 


" W. H. Cone. 


" W. Kimball. 


Major L. G. Heilig. 


I873- 


" J. D. Bowles. 


" A. D. L. Moser. 


a a a 


1874. 


" S. Rothrock. 


" W. R. Ketchie. 


it tt a 


1875. 


" " " 


" R. L. Brown. 


ec lf el 


1876. 


" L. A. Bikle, 
D. D. 


" C. H. Bernheim. 


Rev. S. Rothrock. 


1877. 


" L. A. Bikle, 
D. D. 


" W. Kimball. 


" " " 


1878. 


" G. D. Bernheim, 
D. D. 


" L. A. Bikle, D. D. 


" " " 


1879. 


" L. A. Bikle, 
D. D. 


" J. S. Heilig. 


tt a a 


1880. 


" S. Rothrock. 


" J. A. Linn, Jr. 


Col. P. N. Heilig. 


1881. 


" V. R. Stickley. 


" W. J. Smith. 


a a a 


1882. 


" S. T. Hallman. 


tt a tt 


a << a 


1883. 




" J. A. Linn, Jr. 


< £ a it 


1884. 


" J. A. Linn, Jr. 


" T. S. Brown. 


a a a 


1885. 


" W. A. Lutz. 


" B. S. Brown. 


tt tt a 


1886. 


" F.W.E. Peschau, 


" J. L. Buck. 


a a tt 


1887. 


" D.D. 


it a a 


a a a 


1888. 


" " " " 


« C. B. King. 


a tt it 


1889. 


" " " " 


" " " 


a it tt 


1890. 


" G. H. Cox, D.D. 


" " " 


Mr. I. F. Patterson. 


1891. 


it a a a 


a a tt 


a tt tt 


1892. 


" " " " 


a a a 


a tt a 


1893. 


" " " " 


a a a 


<t tt tt 


1894. 


" B. S. Brown. 


t( tt It 


a it tl 


1895. 


" " " 


« a a 


a a 1 1 -tt 


1896. 


" V. R. Stickley. 


" M. G. G. Scherer. 


"J. D. Heilig. 


1897 


" " " 


" H. N. Miller, Ph. D. 


a a a 


1898. 


" C. A. Rose. 


" L. E. Busby, D. D. 


a a tt 


1899. 


a a a ■%■ 


it it it it 


tt a a 


1900. 


" C. B. Miller. 


" C. B. King. 


a a a 


1901. 


" 


it a tt 


tt tt a 



* Died in office. 



CHAPTER XXII. 



A TAELE SHOWING THE WORK OF THE BOARD OF CHURCH 
EXTENSION. 



1888 
1889 
1890 
1891 
1892 

1893 
1894 

1895 
1896 

1897 
1898 
1899 
1900 
1901 



Seed planted by St. Enoch's Church, Enochville. 
Amount reported as being on hand 



#75 °° 
98 21 

284.95 
398 58 
421 09 
611 10 
960 24 
[095 00 
[407 83 
[544 05 
'547 23 
[823 33 
[923 90 
[943 9a 



Loaned. Returned. 

Amount loaned St. James', Concord, to build St. 

Andrew's, Concord #500 00 #500 00 

Amount loaned St. Matthew's Mission, Wilmington, N. C. 350 00 350 00 

Amount loaned Bethany, Stokes County, N. C 100 00 100 00 

Amount loaned St. Mark's, China Grove, N. C 400 00 200 00 

Amount loaned Christ's Church, Spencer, N. C 200 00 

Amount loaned Haven, Chestnut Hill, Salisbury, N. C. . 400 00 

(190) 



CHAPTER XXIII. 

A TABLE SHOWING THE STATISTICS OF THE WOMAN'S HOME AND 
FOREIGN MISSIONARY SOCIETIES. 



1SS6 
1887 
1888 
1889 
1890 



1S94 

1895 
1896 
1897 
1898 
1899 
1900 



Where Convention Was Held. 



St. James", Concord 

St. Enoch's, Enoch ville 

St. John's, Salisbury 

Holy Trinity, Mt. Pleasant 

Lutheran Chapel 

St. Mark's, Charlotte 

St. Peter's, Rowan 

Union 

Holy Trinity, Mt. Pleasant 

Organ 

St. Enoch's, Enoch ville 

St. John's, Salisbury 

Bethel, Rowan 

St. Mark's, Charlotte 

Lutheran Chapel 

(191) 



>>.!? 


ui 


rt <u 






P, 


sen 




< 


§ 



14320*274 

19467 474 

17419 645 

22 552; 602 

22 605! 740 

22;64I| 731 

23 7-7! 615 
27S34 796 
27 693 726 
27 900 1062 
26 85 1 1 860 
29967 

29 889 
29915 

30 944 



999 
875 
816 

877 



18 
iS 
48 

37 
82 

9°, 

23 

84 

4 5 

93 

30 

34 

82 

19 
83 



265 
199 

317 

279 

303 



$93 17 

86 22 

58 91 

108 35 
120 34 

109 33 



Date Due 



. 








^OM % 


L9.S* 






L w m 


kpr 






S«p 23/33 
















Lz&W 








JMIIO^ 


« 






fcPB 3 '4 


• 
9 






f ""' 


WJ 






at!" £ H 
















U|&1 8H| 


1 






Lug 7 St 








| AUG 2 2 "5 









































L. B. Cat. No. 1137 



284.1 X '..', ' 7}< 135634 



b rary 






I 



nil 



n 



* r 



n